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Old 02-08-2009, 04:39 PM   #3
OLChemist
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My understanding is the culprit isn't the yellow corn per say but particular cultivars of hybrid corn. What you are looking for is called open-pollinated sweet corn (field corn is livestock feed; flint corn is meal or popcorn types).

Seeds:

Lots of heirloom seed places and survivalist stores carry open-pollinated corns. (The survivalists like the stuff because unlike hybrid corn you can actually get viable seeds from the crop.)

My mom used to grow open-pollinated corn when I was a kid. It had to be planted differently than hybrids. The growth wasn't uniform like what our neighbors got with their kitchen gardens full of hybrids. Some kinds she had to plant in clumps. We had way more problems with corn borers and such. (You learned to have a pretty high tolerance for cooked bugs with your veggies with my mom's pesticide-free garden. I still can't eat broccoli without flipping it over and checking for hidden caterpillars.) It could cross pollinate with other corn in the area and make bad seeds.

Corn meals and popping corn:

Most organic markets will carry at least blue corn meal and frequently blue or red popcorn. Arrowhead Mills, Bob's Red Mill, even Amazon.com has a range of cornmeals including blue, red and white.

Posole and dried corn:

Southwestern gourmet food companies carry these. I have a bag of blue corn dried posole I bought in a organic food story in Albq. I've never seen the blue corn equivalent of Cope's dried corn in blue or red varieties, but if someone has figured out how to market it to the Sante Fe tourist crowd, then you can buy it, LOL.

Fresh non-hybrid corn:

Your local organic or gourmet market may occasionally get non-hybrid corns. My local yuppie-mart used to get multi-color fresh corn from a farm in Colorado. It was about $1/ear. I served it to company once. One guy wouldn't eat it at all; he thought the non-yellow and non-white corn was poisonous. It seemed most people at the table didn't like it. It had tougher hulls, smaller kernels, and was starchy not sweet.

Last edited by OLChemist; 02-08-2009 at 04:48 PM.. Reason: Omitted posole.
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