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Old 02-15-2009, 08:46 AM   #10
OLChemist
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Just a clarification, the lime used to process corn is not the citrus fruit but is calcium hydroxide Ca(OH)2. Wood ash is another source of base used in Native corn processing. The action of the base frees bound niacin and improves the balance of amino acids available. There is also some evidence that this processing significantly reduces levels of fungus produced toxins.

Hominy/posole are produced by soaking dried corn kernels in lye, in north American Native foodways derived from wood ash. The pectin and cellulose in the hull is dissolved and kernel swells. The basic solution is poured off and the swollen corn repeatedly rinsed until the base is gone.

Green Chile Stew w/ Hominy

1/2 lb mild New Mexico green chiles, roasted, peeled, seeded, de-veined, and chopped.

2 lbs pork butt, with excess fat removed.

2 large onions, finely chopped.

4-6 cloves of garlic, crushed

2 quarts of chicken stock.

3 14oz cans of hominy.

1/2 tsp each cumin, ground cloves and cayenne pepper.

chopped cilantro and lime wedges for garnish.

Cut the pork into 1 1/2" cubes. In a 5-6 quart crock pot mix stock, onion, garlic, spices, chiles, and pork. Add water to make about 5 quarts. Cook on low for 6-8 hours depending on your crockpot (make sure the soup gets to a boil). 1-2 hours before serving, skim the broth, drain and add the hominy and adjust spices to taste.

Garnish with limes and cilantro when serving.

The heat level in this dish can be a bit unpredictable since to depends on the green chiles. I taste my chiles and modify the quantity accordingly. Of course if you're serving real New Mexicans this is way too mild
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