View Single Post
Old 07-24-2010, 12:57 PM   #9
storyteller
PowWow Visitor
 
storyteller's Avatar
 
Items Elephant
User InfoThanks / Tagging InfoGifts / Achievements / AwardsvBActivity Stats
storyteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond repute
storyteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond reputestoryteller has a reputation beyond repute
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,833
Credits: 0.00
Savings: 0.00
Well this is an interesting thread.

For many years I've traced my "black Irish" family as well as the use of that term. In our case, the Gaelic word black "duibh" is part of our name. According to our family history, it was used to differentiate our extended clan (with black hair and dark skin) from other clans in neighboring territories.

Our family married into neighboring Gaelic clans, but we were in the mountainous interior, never near the coast or the Spanish shipwreck.

When we were starved out by the English, my grandparents came to the United States but wanted nothing to do with "new england." They brought their children to New Orleans, where they boarded a river boat and went up the Mississippi, looking for Indians to live with.

Starved and homeless, they thought their best chance of survival was with the Native people here, and not the whites.

I guess I'm proof that they were correct. But to this day, if you go into our old territory in Ireland, you see dark-skinned, black-haired natives. With blue eyes.

So, I think the term "black Irish" refers to one of the old tribes of Ireland. That is what my Irish elders tell me, and I believe em:)
__________________
Disclaimer: Eyes and I are friends no matter what our evil twins say on the rhyme thread.
storyteller is offline   Reply With Quote Share with Facebook