Thread: IACA ReDux
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Old 01-07-2012, 02:30 AM   #98
yaahl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OLChemist View Post
Yeap. This is a multimillion dollar business. And that is just the investor and gallery owner's take, LOL. The artists are the small fish in the pond.

The value of so much of the work relies of the provenance of the work. Until the IACA, the burden of determination of "Indian authenticity" was on the gallery owner. So the owners had to either know the artist and community or make judgements on phenotype. I could see this being a huge liability for the gallery owner. One peeved buyer with a good attorney and OUCH! Under the IACA, they have a single standard to use.

This law does far more to protect the buyer. Sorry Zeke, the reality is for many buyers the value of the work is in the pedigree of the artist, particularly in the antiquities side. Quality is rarely the first thing a buyer notices; art sales are a first date not a test drive.

You'd get better artist protection with education and use of intellectual property law.




That is an extremely rare protection for visual artists, at least in the states.
But you could also not say that the pedigree of the artist also builds overtime? Just because an artist is say, Arapaho does not mean that they instantly are a sought after artist just because of a tribal affiliation? Patrons that tend to buy according to the artist's pedigree usually have had a previous experience with the artist's work. Once they find a particular artist they like/enjoy their work, it does become important to them that they have bragging rights over the artist's bio. That's one of the reasons they buy that kind of art.

Norval Morrisseau's work is a complete mess because of forgeries and work completed by his students and signed by him. Patrons, galleries, museums and owners of his works are very worried about their investments and are fearful that they piece they own may well be determined to be a fake. Now not quite an anecdote on non-enrolled artists doing native work, but it does demonstrate that even if one has their Indian status confirmed as required by the IACA, it's not going to stop exploitation on another level.
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