Thread: IACA ReDux
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Old 01-07-2012, 05:33 PM   #128
Keely
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yaahl View Post
Provenance is not exclusive to antiques. Artists produce certificates of provenance when they sell their work. It is a record of who has had ownership of the piece and lends itself to the originality of the work. Artists who use students or apprentice in their studio set out in their certs of Provenance that they either worked on the piece themselves or they list off who also worked on it. Along with certs of Provenance, are gallery labels and show documentation.

Provenience is the precise location where an artifact or archaeological sample was recovered archaeologically.

When I sell a painting, I file a copyright registration, complete a cert of provenance, a gallery history, photographs of the work, any insurance information and a complete list of where the piece has been shown. I also make sure the buyer is aware of licensing restrictions, reproduction restrictions and conservation requirements. My paintings are not antiques ..well not yet anyway...lol
I hope to be able to see some of your paintings

I agree that it will be easier in the future to start setting a provenance now, but Wikpedia discribes it as:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provenance

Provenance, from the French provenir, "to come from", refers to the chronology of the ownership or location of an historical object.[1] The term was originally mostly used for works of art, but is now used in similar senses in a wide range of fields, including science and computing. Typical uses may cover any artifact found in archaeology, any object in paleontology, certain documents (such as manuscripts), or copies of printed books. In most fields, the primary purpose of provenance is to confirm or gather evidence as to the time, place, and—when appropriate—the person responsible for the creation, production, or discovery of the object. This will typically be accomplished by tracing the whole history of the object up to the present. Comparative techniques, expert opinions, and the results of scientific tests may also be used to these ends, but establishing provenance is essentially a matter of documentation.

In archaeology (particularly North American archaeology and anthropological archaeology throughout the world), the term provenience is used somewhat similarly to "provenance". Archaeological researchers use provenience to refer to the three-dimensional location of an artifact or feature within an archaeological site,[2] as opposed to provenance, which includes an artifact's complete documented history.

Provenance issues regarding works of art and cultural artifacts is a largely taboo subject within the museum discipline
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