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Old 03-15-2013, 03:58 AM   #4
Zeke
Self-Righteous Injun
 
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Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Lewiston, ID
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The below is directly cribbed from one of the responses. I completely buy it:

"This isn't racist or offensive: I think it is a very interesting comment on the Wizard of Oz's writer Frank L Baum, and current media. We tend to view the Oz stories as playfully childlike, and thus put the author on a pedestal. It is actually very clever, and if you move past the (rightful) indignation, and see the historical inspiration for the photo, it reflects racist attitudes, but does not promote them.

Mark Twain has been considered a racist over the years, but in his time was considered a radical humanitarian, and the idea that all men are created equal and that freedom is a right, regardless of race. But the "N" word, while a derogatory comment even then, has become much more stigmatized today. While Twain used that term because it was an acceptable usage in his time, his novels defy that accepted attitude . If someone were to be in a Huck Finn movie today, I would think the idea of maybe putting one of the adult characters into a Mark Twain costume and black face would be a good reminder of the socially charged atmosphere that we often ignore or "put" up with, and would show contrast of how some things have gotten better, while showing there are still issues.

Going back to the very clever picture (yes, clever), it has taken the line "there's no place like home" and juxtaposed it against Baum's own desire to take the homes away from the original inhabitants of America, to quote the article "was an outspoken racist who called for the literal "annihilation" of Native Americans in an editorial for the newspaper where he worked in December of 1890, just days before the Wounded Knee Massacre."

This photo is speaking on very many levels, and if people get offended, then clearly they don't understand their own culture or history."
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