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Old 06-14-2013, 10:30 AM   #35
yaahl
Sg̱aaga g̱uu hla.
 
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Once upon a time ago, I had to teach a law class on Aboriginal law... now the irony was that the Aboriginal law that I was teaching was in fact, British common-law with a little bit of the Napoleon Civil code thrown in as those are the laws that Canadians have accepted to follow.

In one of my lectures, I asked the class to define what they thought was a legitimate Aboriginal person (now keep in mind all those of you that are not living under the Charter of Rights and Constitution of Canada that an Aboriginal person is classed as either, Status, Metis or Inuit).

Definitions ranged from DNA samples to ability to speak and communicate within the languages of the group, Some were defined by the family connections (and in order to understand that you'd pretty much have to understand the Indian Act and how it set out to destroy the family connections but that's a whole other discussion), other were defined at how Aboriginal someone looked - which is totally ironic here in Canada because... Aboriginal Peoples were never recognized as a visibleminority but rather as a distinct cultural group. Seems our very long history of fur trading and a la facon du pays marriages created an entire group of folks that took on the ways of the Europeans to please the masters of the Northwest and Hudson Bay Companies. The point is, there is no one definition nor is there one way to define us. Simply feeling it in your heart does not give you the collective consciousness of thousands of years of a people. What I feel in my heart, I predict, is nothing close to what you feel in your German heart. When I say "my child" in my language - that phrase comes with a tribe, a clan, a house and most of all a family - my child is all of the above. What I suspect you have in your heart is a yearning to be something that you think will make you happy. My happiness comes not from to whom I am related to, but to what I choose to do to increase my happiness and nurture my Id.

I sat on my Nation's Self Government negotiations and our biggest achievement was taking back the right to govern ourselves AND define who our members are. We tossed those cards away that the government issued and now we define ourselves... our clans are intact, our houses are growing with each new baby born and our people are getting stronger every day. I doubt you will ever feel within your heart what I feel when I stand on the land that my ancestors also stood upon knowing that I have given my people three more generations forward to also stand on the land.

As with any. "I feel it in my heart Indian", please by all means come and join us, but be prepared to work hard for there is much to do - we need critical mass in education, law, medicine, politics, environment, resource management, wildlife preservation and control, fishing and hunting management, housing design, all trade skills, engineers, sea management, arctic sovereignty and management, policy developers, linguists, economic development and sustainability, arts and communication.

If you simply want to sleep in a tipi and pretend you are back on the days of Sitting Bull, may I suggest you book a holiday in Blackfoot Crossing or Elk Island National Park and have at 'er.

In the meantime, I suggest you go off and read the book by Sylvia Van Kirk, "Many Tender Ties" and when you are done that.. try reading these:

Buffalohead, P.K. (1983). Farmers Warriors Traders: A Fresh Look at Ojibway Women. (Document No. 28). In, Minnesota History; The Quarterly of the Minnesota Historical Society. 48 (6) Saint Paul: Minnesota Historical Society, 1983. Pp.236-244. (HRAF Public Information: New Haven, Conn.: HRAF 2000. computer file).

The National Archives Learning Curve, (n.d.). Plains Indians. Retrieved Mar. 31, 2006, from [Spartacus Educational ... ] .

Canada, Indian and Inuit Affairs Program, Research Branch. (1979). A Demographic Profile of Registered Indian Women. Ottawa: Research Branch, Indian and Inuit Affairs Program

Estes, C. P. (1995). Women Who Run With the Wolves; Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype. Ballantine Books: New York

Fisk, J. (1990). Native women in reserve politics: strategies and struggles. Journal of Legal Pluralism 30: pp121-37.

Fournier, S. & Crey, E. (2000). “We can heal”: aboriginal children today. In L.F. Klein & L. A. Ackerman (Eds.), Women and Power in Native North America (pp.303-330). University of Oklahoma Press, Norman.

Fox, T. & Long, D. (2000) Struggles within the circle: Violence, healing and health on a First Nations reserve. In D.Long and O. Dickason (Eds.), Visions of the Heart (pp.271-297) Harcourt Canada Ltd.

Hare, J. & Barman, J. (2000). Aboriginal education: is there a way ahead? In L.F. Klein & L. A. Ackerman (Eds.), Women and Power in Native North America (pp. 331-359). University of Oklahoma Press, Norman.

Kehoe, A.B. (1995). Blackfoot persons. In L. F. Klein & L. A. Ackerman (Eds.), Women And Power in Native North America (pp.113-125). University of Oklahoma Press, Norman.

LaRoque, E. (1994). Violence in Aboriginal Communities. National Clearinghouse on Family Violence: Ottawa, 1994.

Peters, E. (2000). Aboriginal People in Urban Areas. In L.F. Klein & L. A. Ackerman (Eds.), Women and Power in Native North America (pp.237-270). University of Okalahoma Press, Norman.

The Native American Women's Health Education Resource Center. (n.d). Lake Andes, SD. 57356-0572

Voyageur, C. J. (2000). Contemporary Aboriginal women in Canada. In D.Long &

O.P. Dickason (Ed.), Visions of the Heart; Canadian Aboriginal Issues (pp. 81-106). Nelson; Thompson Canada


Then when you are done those, try these:
Canadian Indian Policy

and when you think you might be able to hold up your end of the debate about what is a true Indian other than some ridiculous assumption that all you have to do is feel it in your heart.. then you might try these sources of information:

http://firstnationcitizenship.afn.ca...n_Identity.pdf

http://cinema2.arts.ubc.ca/units/can...dian(Lutz).pdf

http://www.oba.org/en/pdf/sec_news_sept11_c3_palm.pdf


So after reading these... still think you have any reason to ask those of us who know what and who we are.. to define ourselves even further so that you might find a way to enmesh yourself into our communities because you don't like being German...?


In addtion, please feel free to red the Land Claim Agreement that governs me... see yourself anywhere in it?

http://www.eco.gov.yk.ca/pdf/umbrellafinalagreement.pdf
or my Haida roots... http://www.haidanation.ca/Pages/Spla...of%20Claim.pdf
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A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects. — Robert A. Heinlein

I can see the wheel turning but the Hamster appears to be dead.
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