Thread: Native Research
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Old 11-20-2014, 10:20 PM   #6
Josiah
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TeenaBear View Post
ok ok, so what advice do you have for those who have ancestors who were part of what is considered, "Pencil Genocide?"

You have written out the steps of research very well! :)
I addressed it early in this set of posts... if your ancestor left the mainbody of the tribe they were subject to the laws of that state where they now resided. Including the fact that census takers would list whatever race they were instructed to write down.

I am aware that is a bitter pill to swallow, but in my own experience as a researcher you are limited to the documents available to you and what was written on them years and years ago.
Do overs are not an option.
This also brings up one of my main points that I must stress:
If a person was attempting to enroll as a citizen in a particular tribe they would not be using a listing on a census, but they would be determining a connection to a person listed on that particular tribe's base roll.

On the otherhand if they were merely interested in heritage to find a connection to someone in the past, they must understand the limitations of several types of documents. Before 1900 a census only listed the head of household last name and the family was listed under them listed only by first name. Another really annoying habit at this time was to list people by intial and not spell out there full name!! Another issue is following married women for they would not list maiden name. Maps are very helpful gathering an understanding of the location of the people listed on the census. Clues are scattered through out the pages by understanding how it was taken in those days. The census taker traveled and wrote down those they encountered during a day so its possible looking at the actual page tomsee neighbors and in some cases the children of parents merely moved to the next farm and started farming. Like I said clues lol
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Last edited by Josiah; 11-20-2014 at 10:39 PM.. Reason: added much more
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