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Old 02-18-2016, 09:59 AM   #6
OLChemist
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I need to echo JD, turn to your relatives. Native family structures are more extended than those in the dominant culture. You son probably has relatives outside the western nuclear family that would claim and teach him. They will know.

It is admirable that you are trying to help you son learn who he is. But, please remember powwows are part of modern Native cultures, but they are far from the whole picture. The Mvskoke are not "powwow people." The powwow is a relative newcomer.

Cultural activities can be big showy things powwows, Green Corn ceremony, or stomp dance. But the real meat of Native identity is the little things. The Mvskoke ethos is formed by language, kinship structures and customs, foodways, manners and mores, stories, history, prayers... In these things we carry on who we are.

Let me make a few suggestions:

If you're in OK, it is the start of the season for wild onion dinners. Find one. Take your son and taste some culture. Maybe if your lucky, you'll catch some of that fine Mvskoke hymn singing and make some friends.

Take your son to see his people's lands -- often. Native cultures have a spiritual relationship to a specific geographic location. Knowing the land is critical to understanding the stories, morals, and mindset.

If humanly possible, get him speaking his language! Learn it with him. Speak it to him. Take him places to hear it spoken. All of our languages are in danger, some are hanging by a mere thread. They are at the heart of who we are.

Last edited by OLChemist; 02-27-2016 at 11:30 AM..
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