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Old 02-14-2017, 04:34 PM   #4
OLChemist
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OK, I've been biting my tongue. But...

First, do not assume all or even any Native person has read some particular book on beadwork. Most of us learn beading within our communities and families. We may never have looked at a book on beading.

That said, I have read this book.

Carrie Lyford's book takes elements out of designs on finished beadwork. For more than a few, you can match her sketches to pieces in museums. Using her design elements in some cases is copying. Plus, every Lakota fixated hobbist that I know has an early piece or two utilizing 'her' designs.

As for traditional designs. For the moment, I'll put aside that as a non-Indian your work is not within my people's traditions. Tradition has a much to do with the use and spirit of a pieces as the composition. Native people are modern people. We do not slavishly reproduce the patterns of the past. We may have family designs, which we lovingly pass down. But, we also are influenced by the world around us. (I am still toying with the beaded purse inspired by phyllotaxis and the fibonacci sequence.)

Perhaps you ought to look at what you're depicting in your work. I know some Lakota's who look askance at lightening bolts. And some Kiowas of my acquaintance would not take too kindly to your owls.

Tell me please, are you a re-enactor -- people who dress up and imitate life in past eras?
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