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Old 05-17-2017, 06:58 AM   #3
OLChemist
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It isn't a good idea to get more beads per lane than 9. It gets too sloppy looking and is prone to snagging. Having a lane with one more or one less bead is not uncommon at all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Broken Arrow View Post
There is something else I observed and don't have a clue to the considerations to do in this way. The circumferential pattern on a moc is vertical while the other rows on the upper are horizontal if one looks from the toe.

Mocs and their beading have a long tradition and I have not seen an example where it is done otherwise in lazy stitch.
Not following the shape of the edge on a mocc. What an odd idea, LOL. It won't even look like a beaded mocc.

My point is, like all artistic forms, tribal styles of beadwork have their stylistic conventions. These are thing defined by both the use and what "looks right." These conventions arise from practical and esthetic considerations. It's a little like asking why a Pieta always has Mary and Jesus's dead body; that's what the form requires to be a Pieta.

Among my people beadwork descends from quill work. Many of quillwork's conventions were transferred directly to beadwork. The contrasting lane of circumferential design on moccs is one of these. I suspect that the reason for the direction change in quillwork is that it offers some resistance to the snagging and stresses during walking. But, also it is esthetically satisfying to surround the foot with a band of a differing direction and pattern, like the contrast of the sky touching the earth.

Quilled moccs

Quilled baby moccs

Quilled moccs
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