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Old 09-19-2017, 04:51 PM   #10
LizBrokenArrow
Liz Broken Arrow
 
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Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: New Jersey, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OLChemist View Post
I can give you a couple of reasons why this kind of thing happens in family stories. You're probably not going to like them. Understand I'm NOT saying these things happened in your particular case.

1) The original storyteller extrapolates from their understanding or experience to fill in missing details. So, they "know" Indians lived on reservations and their great-grandma was an Indian. A miracle then occurs. Quod erat faciendum, great-grandma lived on a reservation!

Oddly, this reservation was in whatever state in which great-grandma passed away. Whether or not there is a reservation there. I've had more than my share of arguments with folks who had claimed a Shawnee, Cherokee, Mohegan, Cheyenne, etc great-grandmother whose tombstone was in OH, PA, WV or some other state with no reservations. In the face of data to the contrary, they insist she lived on a reservation in OH, PA, WV, etc.

2) The original storyteller engaged in wish fulfillment and created the Native in the family tree. They told their friends, their children, anyone who'd listen about their Indian roots. Their child then told their children about their Indian ancestor. Now these children are looking for their ancestors. There is no way their mom and nana could have lied to them! So, they search for a non-exisitant Indian.

3). People misinterpret Indian census rolls. Folks got enrolled, disenrolled, turned down.... People are mistaken about names.
I am not offended. I understand completely. No worries. You can be brutally honest with me. I am not one to get offended easily. I am praying that this does not the case with me because I will feel very hurt by my family. I have taken the required blood test, and I already filed an application for tribal registration. I have furnished them all of the information that I had found so far at the time of mailing out my registration. I have given them all of the names of my parents, and of all four of my grandparents from both sides of my family including the locations in Puerto Rico where I found out that they were born, lived or at least where I suspect that they were born from my online searches. I am hoping that that is not another brick wall and that the info that I furnished them is conformable. I have found more info like the names of my great-grandparents, and great-great grandparents, but only after I already put in my application. I will furnish that to them if they request it in case they turned up zero on their end. I still do not know how the registration process works after you've put in registration forms. But eventually I will find out. I will keep you posted on that. Than y
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Peace and Blessings,
Liz Broken Arrow

I am looking to join a Pow Wow dance team in Bergen County New Jersey or surrounding area. Dance Style: Jingle Dancing.



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