View Single Post
Old 09-21-2017, 06:57 PM   #16
OLChemist
Pow Wow Committee
 
OLChemist's Avatar
 
Items ElephantPresent
User InfoThanks / Tagging InfoGifts / Achievements / AwardsvBActivity Stats
OLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond repute
OLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond repute
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 2,688
Credits: 0.00
Savings: 0.00
Quote:
Originally Posted by eagleclanriverband View Post
... But I feel the need to speak up now because I think you are being misled by whatever group you filled out an application for “tribal registration” to.

I hope you understand that there is NO Taino & Carib Indian Tribe that is legally US Federally Recognized and that the PR Commonwealth Govt. does not officially recognize any Taino/Arawak & Carib Tribe on the Island either. This has nothing to do with your family & who your ancestors were. All PR Tainos aren't legally recognized by the BIA as an American Indian Tribe.

There are a number of Taino “social friendship clubs”, “cultural organizations” & “political action groups” (they call themselves different things); NONE of these groups/entities can offer you “tribal enrollment” that is LEGALLY considered by the US Govt./BIA to be as belonging to a US Federally Recognized American Indian Tribe.

Thank you, I've been grappling with how to word this myself.


I've never understood this obsession with a card. Paper doesn't make an Indian. Enculturation makes an Indian. Kin makes an Indian. Language makes an Indian.

I would caution you, be very careful how you use that ID. These cards are not real federally recognized tribal ID's. The numbers on them indicate enrollment in a federally recognized tribe. In one of your earlier threads you mentioned education benefits. Understand that almost all of those require enrollment in a federally recognized tribe.

I put the phrase federally recognized in bold because it has import in Native America. It means your tribe has a particular legal relationship with the US government. Enrolled members of those tribes have particular legal standing within US law. Tribal ID card and CDIB's are markers of this relationship. Without them, you're outside those legal boundaries.

The recognition process wasn't perfect. It left people out. It wasn't irreversible. Ask @eagleclanriverband she can tell you all about termination.

Before someone starts the "I don't need no stinking Fed to tell me I'm Indian." I never claimed that you needed that be part of a Native community.

May I suggest Steven Pevar's book for a relatively painless introduction to the legal landscape of Native America.

Rights of Indian Tribes
OLChemist is offline   Reply With Quote Share with Facebook