Thread: Knife Sheaths
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Old 01-14-2018, 10:39 AM   #5
OLChemist
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I should clarify the gluing comment.

The beadwork is done on buckskin. The buckskin with the completed beadwork (excluding the edges) is glued over the rawhide envelope. Then the edges are beaded.

Also in the old days glue was made for hide scraping and certain tendons. It was mixed with dry pigment to adhere the paint to rawhide. It was used for making tools and weapons. So, glue isn't necessarily a anachronism. But remember we're a modern people; we have always used what best serves our needs.

When looking at the old work, remember when working with sinew the holes were made with a fine awl. The awl can go through thicker/harder leather than beading needles. When working with latigo or other heavy leather, you can pre-punch the holes with an awl.

Beaded sheath

Beaded sheath 2

Look closely at these. In the first one, you can see beading over the edges. On the second, you can see the sinew going through the rawhide liner.

As for rawhide. I can't recall any of the names, but there a places in Germany that sell a full range of supplies for Native style crafts.
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