Thread: Knife Sheaths
View Single Post
Old 01-16-2018, 08:37 AM   #16
OLChemist
Pow Wow Committee
 
OLChemist's Avatar
 
Items ElephantPresent
User InfoThanks / Tagging InfoGifts / Achievements / AwardsvBActivity Stats
OLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond repute
OLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond repute
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 3,353
Credits: 0.00
Savings: 0.00
*Rose takes a deep breath, before slapping around some European patriarchy. Woman's work eh...*

Ok, your joke touched on a hot-button stereotype. Forgive me, if I use this as a teachable moment. I'm using your post as a launching point. Please don't take this personally.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chalako View Post
I tought this was work for the woman...LOL.
Not this again!

Apocryphal "Chief Two Eagles" quote

I hope you don't actually believe the above reflects gender relations in all of Native America. In the old days, my people distributed labor along gender lines. But, that division was not subordination of one gender to the other. It did not mean women's work was of little value. It was in European law where women were property of their father's and husbands. It was your male focused ethnology and history that devalued our work and lives. (While fetishizing the collecting of material culture often produced by women.)

Yes, women honored their male relatives and husbands by processing the hides and meat that their men risked their lives to obtain. But, a man could do tasks normally done by women, when needed. He'd be ill-equipped to survive his labors if he couldn't make or mend his moccasins or make a robe, when traveling far from the comforts of home. And, no man would want a woman who couldn't defend and feed his children when he or her male relatives were unable to help. Unlike the Victorians, we never regarded labor as debasing to a woman. A high status woman was constantly encouraged to industry and generosity. The tiyospaye could not function if one half was devalued, and without the tiyospaye we were worse than uncivilized.

Plus, hello, this is the 21st century. I respect anyone, regardless of gender, who is willing to do the hard, tedious labor involved in making old-style brain-tan. Just as I respect those who preserve traditional European arts.

Eye's has a pretty good catch. A man who puts his labor, in all areas, to the support of his kin and his people. That is a real Indian man - regardless of whether he conforms to some older standard of gender roles.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chalako View Post
I wonder if the hide of a buffalo is harder to prepare than for exemple a deer.
Ever tried to lift a wet or damp buffalo hide? My ancestresses -- Anglo and Native -- were way sterner stuff than I. I thank the Creator, that I was born in the post-antiboitic, car-driving, labor saving, grocery store days.

Last edited by OLChemist; 01-16-2018 at 12:36 PM.. Reason: Yeah, Rose, what is a jolke anyway. A mutually agreed upon spelling is a good thing.
OLChemist is offline   Reply With Quote Share with Facebook