Thread: Redhorse cafe
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Old 03-28-2018, 01:47 PM   #45925
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolbox View Post
Thanks! Now is that red from dye or from the beet sugar?
OK. I got to play chemist.

Betanin -- Beetroot Red, E162, 4-(2-(2-carboxy-5-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-2,3-dihydro-6- hydroxy-1H-indol-1-yl)ethenyl)-2,3-dihydro-(S-(R*,R*))-2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid -- is an aromatic indole derivative and a glycoside. There is a highly conjugated (colored) portion attached to a sugar molecule.

We've all seen the incredible magenta stains, pickled beets make. This is a highly concentrate soup of dye molecules, of which betanin is the most common. Chemically it is a delicate beast. Betanin readily degrades in the presence of oxygen and light and at elevated temperatures -- like baking a cake. Moisture and certain metal ions accelerate these reactions. As a food colorant, it is suitable mostly for frozen preparations and certain candies, like fondants and cream centers. The highly colored solutions you get from boiling beets, that are used for dying easter eggs and yarns, also carry a lot of beet flavor. Not desirable in a food dye.

Allura Red -- FD&C Red 40, Disodium 6-hydroxy-5-[(2-methoxy-5-methyl-4-sulfophenyl)azo]-2-naphthalenesulfonate -- is a azo dye, originally derived from coal tar. It's probably one of the hundreds of coal tar dyes developed Johann Griess, Rudolf Nietzki and their colleagues in the German chemical industry around the turn of the last century.

It's a more stable molecule, allowing it to be used in a wider range of food products and processing methods.
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