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Old 09-12-2018, 11:00 AM   #46293
OLChemist
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Broken Arrow View Post
LOL, if you like. I might give you an try on an amateur translation.
If I had the German copy, I'd take you up on that.

Honestly, I can figure enough of the instructions to use the product safely. It is kind of funny. On the SDS all the German chemical names were translated on the instructions about one third were left in German. However, English chemical nomenclature has such a strong German and shared Latin linguistic inheritance that if I sound the words out, I know what the compounds are. Kaliumquecksilbercyanid (don't worry this isn't in the oxidizer) and Sulfatlosung are obvious. While we say Potassium in English not Kalium, the symbol is a K and everyone who has had chemistry in high school knew that at one point.


There are two sentences that are intended to caution against cross contaminating the solution with an acidic pretreatment where they use protract/protracted. Because I know that acid and this solution aren't safe to mix, I can tell they are using protracted to mean carrying retained oxidizer or pretreatment on the surface of the metal into the other solution. But, while conceptually there is overlap, protract/protracted are not used that way in American English and probably not British English either. It's such an odd use, I wonder how they got it. Does a German word or phrase that means means retaining liquid, transferring one thing to another, or cross contaminating sound like protract?
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