View Single Post
Old 09-12-2018, 12:15 PM   #7
OLChemist
Pow Wow Committee
 
OLChemist's Avatar
 
Items ElephantPresent
User InfoThanks / Tagging InfoGifts / Achievements / AwardsvBActivity Stats
OLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond repute
OLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond repute
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 3,152
Credits: 0.00
Savings: 0.00
Speaking generically, not about the woman in the picture.

Sure, there is clothing that signals. T-shirts with the names and logos of powwows, Native conferences, or other events. There is clothing with Native influenced patterns. Certain of these, like Pendleton, have become ubiquious. There is clothing designed by Native artists. There are kinds of jewelry, like quilled or beaded earrings. But commerce dictates the spread of these items, not just ethnicity. They didn't card me (ask to see a tribal id card) last time I bought sweatshirts at Sinte Gleska University any more than my alma mater asked to see my diploma when I bought a t-shirt there, LOL.

Indian people are like anyone else picking clothing. They wear clothing with Native designs or don Native jewelry or choose to wear a particular dominant culture fashion because they like it as well as to signal identity. Half the older men back home dress like cowboys/ranchers, because men in the rural west dress that way.

Sometimes people choose not wear these items to signal the identity that would normally be asserted by the wearing of these items. For example, I'm a mixed blood. When I go to a powwow or other Native event, I don't dress in Native themed clothing, because I don't want to be mistaken for a wannabe (non-Native person who wants to be Indian). I do this because, rightly or wrongly, I perceive these people as putting on a ton of Indian jewelry and a half a dozen Indian themed clothing items to scream "look at me I'm dressed like an Indian." I don't want to accidentally signal membership in that group.

Last edited by OLChemist; 09-13-2018 at 10:20 AM..
OLChemist is offline   Reply With Quote Share with Facebook