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Old 09-21-2018, 10:09 PM   #39
wardancer
Me & Eyes are the best !
 
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Join Date: Sep 2000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OLChemist View Post
To the OP:

I suspect you appreciate this, but it needs restating. Forgive me if I repeat something you already know.

Native ways spring from very different roots than those of Europe. These differences run deep. The New World does not have Hellenistic roots. One area of significant discontinuity is modes of learning and inquiry.

Western methods of inquiry are shaped by Plato's Socratic Dialogues. In the west you question and you debate. Classroom learning is deductive -- ie I stand in the front my students lecturing and demonstrating. I will tell them what patterns they should see and how they should preform a task. Then I will probe their understanding by questioning. And they will refine their understanding by questioning me.

Native learning is different. It is largely inductive. There is no Socrates in the front of the classroom, question and debating. There are eyes and ears and brain. You observe and reflect. You watch others and when ready copy. The patterns slowly emerge. The instructor models and talks around the subject. You're left to put the pieces together. When you must offer direction it is done without imposing on the autonomy of student, often by analogy.

Further, like all cultures the sacred is treated with respect and care. The difference is, in some Native cultures, part of that respect is embodied in a need to know approach to information about the scared. Realize the sacred can be dangerous if abused. There are metaphysical consequences to the sharing and use of scared knowledge. Thus information may not be readily shared, even within the tribe. For example as a woman, I don't need to know what men do in their ceremonies.

Questioning about such matters is done very carefully in many Native cultures. If you're going to ask you must be prepared for silence to great your inquiry. Not out of maliciousness, but out of respect for the Creator's original instructions. It is important to listen carefully to the words spoken and those not given voice. Both have things to teach you.
Thank-you my friend. You have much more patience than I and your words are special.
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