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Old 10-23-2018, 01:32 PM   #2
OLChemist
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Nice. I like the design.

I'm going to make a few suggestions:

If you're beading this after you've sewn the bag together don't. Bead all but the area right by the seam. Then sewn and turn the bag. Bead over the seam.

Bead on the rough side. I can't tell for sure from the picture, but it looks like you're beading on the smooth side. You can get your needle in deeper on the rough side. Also the softness and flex lets your beads move a little, which can hide a not perfectly spaced stitch.

When beading, those little peaks of white hide, can be really disconcerting. It can make you want to cram your rows closer together. Resist! You're sitting directly above the work, you will see tiny gaps that aren't visible in the finished piece. Crowding is more visible.

A ruler and an Exacto knife are your friends when cutting fringe. I use a quilting ruler with a nice grid and clear surface to get even strips. If the leather shifts, cut on a scrap of plywood. The roughness of the wood will hold the hide and keep it from slipping.


Go look up work by: Rhonda Holy Bear, Juanita Growing Thunder Fogarty, Teri Greeves, Holly Young, Karen Beaver, Molly Murphy Adams, Richard Aitson... Study their work.
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