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Old 10-23-2018, 05:00 PM   #7
OLChemist
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Maybe I misunderstand. Ms Holy Bear's work isn't old.

I've had a few chances to examine really old - sinew sewn - stuff. It was amazing what those ladies could do with an awl. I once saw a set of Cheyenne men's moccasins beaded in 18/0's on sinew! Someone really loved their son or husband to do that work.

Seed beads are made by using a machine to pull a glass tube. These tubes are cut into smaller cans. The canes are mixed with charcoal and plaster and fired polished to produce a round/oval shape. (Some of the glass formulations used to make the tubes are striking colors and don't reach their final color until the fire polishing.) The finished beads are cleaned, sorted and strung.

The tubes for the really old beads were pulled by two running men. Hence the irreproducibility in size.
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