Thread: Some eye candy
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Old 09-10-2020, 12:15 PM   #6
OLChemist
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Jewelry by Mitchell Zephier, Sr:

Lakota Visions Etsy Store


For me this is a bit of a blast from the past, as it were. When I was an undergrad he was one of the rare jewelers expanding on in the northern plains metalworking tradition. His work evolved from the stamping and rocker engraving on german silver that was done to create or modify german silver jewelry. He uses a lot of chip inlay. I have a lot respect for him and really admire his technique. He gets great results with a difficult metal.


FYI --

German silver and brass are common metals to start jewelry students out with, because they are cheap and hard to melt. Rarely do you get a novice reducing a piece of brass or german silver to a puddle. But they are hard to solder. The silver alloys that are used for sterling don't wet the surfaces well. There are brazing alloys specifically for the metal but they can have issues. These metals feel gummy when you saw them and clog file and sandpaper more than sterling. Ultimately, people usually move to sterling despite the cost, because it is just easier to work with. It takes more skill to produce comparable results with german silver or brass.

Last edited by OLChemist; 09-10-2020 at 12:16 PM.. Reason: Autocomplete tried to read my mind again.
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