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Old 03-31-2003, 12:29 PM   #3
powwowbum49
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Join Date: Sep 2000
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Tahamet

The first thing you have to do is come up with a design. I usually just sketch stuff out on any ole sheet of paper just to see if I am going to like the design or if it needs things added in certain areas or deleted in others. I often make several different ones and then combine parts of many to come up with one I like.

Then I go and start putting it on graph paper. Remember that graph paper is never exact in proportion to finished loom work. Also you can determine the length down the work by the size of your beads. By this I mean if you are working in 11/0 beads then there will be approximately 11 completed rows to one inch of length (I know your Canadian rulers don't always have inches on them, but get one that does or convert....LMAO)

Next is stringing your loom up. You will need to use a thread for this that does not have stretch to it. I normally use hand quilting thread for this, and then nymo for the thread that is actually going through the beads. I also double the outer most threads on each side of the work just to make sure it is nice and strong since those threads will see the most wear coming into contact with other things. (remember that if your design is X number of beads high then you will have to put X+1 strings on the loom and then 2 more to do that doubling thing I mentioned...e.g. your design is 20 beads high so 20 + 1 + 2 extra strings = 23 strings)

you are now ready to start beading. You need to choose a nymo size appropriate for the bead size you are using. I say thing because you needle and thread will be passing though the beads multiple times and those little suckers will break from the inside out if you get too much thickness passing though the inside. I usually use size D nymo for 11/0 and 12/0 Czech beads, then size B for 13/0 and smaller beads. But the bead maker also determines the size of the hole going through the bead, an example would be French beads because the whole size in them is the same size no matter what the size of the bead is. I bring this up because you want the hole to be fairly full so the beads aren't extremely loose in the work.

I will stop now and wait for some more questions you might have.
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PB49

"Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up." Pablo Picasso

"Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, but today is a gift...that is why is it called the Present." Master Oogway - KungFu Panda


My comments are based on what I have been taught and my experiences over the years I have been around the circle. They should in no way be taken as gospel truths and are merely my opinions or attempts at passing on what I have learned while still learning more.
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