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Old 04-14-2003, 07:54 AM   #37
OLChemist
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There are a couple of tricks/cautions I learned while studying European weaving traditions, which may help:

If you have a single loose warp, you can slide a small stick under the thread in question, give it a twist to snug it up, then tape the stick down to hold the tension. For a small group of loose warp you can wedge a fold of heavy paper under, against the beam and that will tighten the threads right up.

When I was starting, I was constantly warned by my weaving teacher "not to break the backs of my slevedges (outermost threads)." If it bent it was too tight. (Most novice weavers have their first piece come out hourglass shaped or trapziodal, from pulling the edges too tight.) Sounds like that applies here too.

I tried loomwork once, as a kid, at church camp (big mistake to try to learn this from a gum-cracking teenager from Detroit). We had been given Nymo for the warp, was like warping the loom with different sized rubber bands. Even done right this seems a -- uh, for lack of a better word -- fussy technique. I will say you guys that do this have way more patience than I do. My hat's off to you.
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