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Old 12-10-2003, 01:15 AM   #11
rwgirl
Tiny Tot Dancer
 
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Misunderstanding?

Is it safe to say that I misunderstood that the young navajo man from arizona, whose post I commented on, has been brought into the arena here in Oklahoma, dressed by the Osages, or the Comanches, therefore obtaining the rights to this dance by being brought in and given the dance? There was a feed, his clothes were given, the whole shabang?
If not, then I don't agree with letting someone dress straight dance just because they like it, or saw it on a video, or a book or by any other avenue than through the originators of this dance.
This issue is addressed so many times on this forum, yet no one seems to realize the depth or the importance of the procedures required. There are reasons these steps are followed and its not because you mean no disrespect, but just because this is a very traditional dance with very specific traditions that go with it.
It's not about "leaving anyone out or trying to exclude any certain tribe", but including them into this society, by this society, in front of those whom this dance was made for. It is a warrior society, there are songs that go with someone coming into the arena for the first time in this regalia. There are introductions to the drum, to the society to the people. If these tribes require it of their very own tribal members, do you think it might offend them to just "do it" because you like it.
My gosh, am I the only one who still believes in our old ways. Has commercial pow wow opened the door to "do whatever you want to, just show a little respect"? Maybe I sound mean, but I have seen how this is done and know the blessings that come from it. I have seen 200 straight dancers in one arena, heard the songs, the camp crier, the feeds, the massive gift giving.....the value of what this dance is worth to someone who wants to dance it, and the value put within this dance by the straight dance society.
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