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Old 04-23-2002, 09:09 PM   #5
Tom Iron Eagle
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Florida
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There are two views to this subject.

First, some drums are really rushing the honor beats and the song itself - meaning they are having a hard time with the tempo and rhythm. In this case the song is compromised and the only fix is practice, practice, and practice.

Second, in some Southern songs and especially in some Southeastern songs the honor beats or heavy beats as they are called by some Southeastern People are rushed on purpose as part of the way things are done. And this is done in different ways:

1. The rhythm and tempo for the song during the honor beats is rushed, yet the tempo returns to the previous speed afterwards (western musical terms would be "accellerando" and " a tempo" respectively). One cultural reason is to just have fun and show happiness in the song.

2. The beats are not really rushed at all. Instead there is a completely different rhythm for them that does not fall into the normal feel of the song (referred to as a "hemiola" in western musical terms). One cultural reason is that this creates a phenomenon in sound showing respect for the phenomenons of the spirit world.

Both of these cases can be heard across the country. You can distinquish one from the other by listening closely to the words instead of the beats. In example #1 everything rushes just a bit but in example #2 the words seem to stay the same tempo as the beats seem to speed up thus creating the sound phenomenon.

One must remember that most songs in general do gradually speed up - but there is a big difference between this gradual feel that naturally happens as the push-ups go along and just plain rushing the song.

Any drums that just plain rush need to practice more.
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