View Single Post
Old 01-14-2004, 08:54 PM   #3
One Hot Mama
Teen Dancer
 
User InfoThanks / Tagging InfoGifts / Achievements / AwardsvBActivity Stats
One Hot Mama has a brilliant futureOne Hot Mama has a brilliant futureOne Hot Mama has a brilliant futureOne Hot Mama has a brilliant futureOne Hot Mama has a brilliant futureOne Hot Mama has a brilliant futureOne Hot Mama has a brilliant futureOne Hot Mama has a brilliant futureOne Hot Mama has a brilliant futureOne Hot Mama has a brilliant futureOne Hot Mama has a brilliant future
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Nashville, TN
Posts: 420
Credits: 0.00
Savings: 0.00
What white folks don't understand is that only federally-recognized tribes can operate casinos, that those tribes can operate only in states where some form of gaming is legally permitted, and that the tribes have to have gaming compacts with the states they are in. Not only that, Indian gaming is more tightly controlled than non-Indian gaming.

Apparently, this bunch of wannabe's doesn't understand this either.

The process of federal recognition is arduous, with many strictly defined criteria, all of which must be met, before a petition of recognition can even be presented to the congressional committee which makes the determinations as to which petition will be accepted for a vote. The process takes decades, even for a tribe which was previously recognized then terminated during the Eisenhower administration. And congress has not been very receptive to granting recognition since 1980.

But try to explain that to these "tribes" who think that they are Indian just cuz they say so.

My family ran off during Removal or snuck back over, and while we have the documentation to prove our ancestors on the rolls, none of us have gone for enrollment. I've never lived in OK, and while my grandmother used to visit relatives there as a young woman, I don't know any of them. If I were to petition for enrollment, it has to be because I want to give my time, talents, and energy to be an asset to the tribe-not for freebies, gaming dividends, per cap checks, etc. I put myself through Vanderbilt University(I owe beau coup bucks in student loans still), have worked all my life-even as a kid, don't drink, smoke, do drugs, or break the law. My kids are in school or have graduated from school, are sober, and no one's in jail. Would I be an asset to the CNO? Maybe, but how if I don't live there?

Considering the problems alot of tribes are having with enrolled members, and the resurrection of banishment, I think tribes have got to start being choosier, not just granting citizenship because someone meets criteria but making sure the petitioner will strengthen the community if granted status. Why not hold back per cap until the member completes college, tech or trade school, or a stint in the military? Or at least until age 25.

If someone has kids they're not supporting, take their per cap and other tribal income and pay child support to the custodial parent or relative.

The Native Corporations in Alaska teach kids how to plan and operate a business beginning in pre-school so that they grow up to understand how to handle money better. Why not every tribe, and teach not just the little ones but the older kids and adults? Sure it's money, but it's a resource, and our traditional cultures all teach us that a resource is a gift from Creator and is to be used wisely for the greater good of all.

Being Native is not a birthright, it's a privilege, a gift from Creator. Being an enrolled member of a tribe should be considered in the same way, and each member should return many times over the investment that the tribe and the ancestors have made in him/her.
One Hot Mama is offline   Reply With Quote Share with Facebook