View Single Post
Old 01-23-2004, 02:58 PM   #9
SmokeEater
Insert Image Here
 
User InfoThanks / Tagging InfoGifts / Achievements / AwardsvBActivity Stats
SmokeEater has a reputation beyond repute
SmokeEater has a reputation beyond reputeSmokeEater has a reputation beyond reputeSmokeEater has a reputation beyond reputeSmokeEater has a reputation beyond reputeSmokeEater has a reputation beyond reputeSmokeEater has a reputation beyond reputeSmokeEater has a reputation beyond reputeSmokeEater has a reputation beyond reputeSmokeEater has a reputation beyond reputeSmokeEater has a reputation beyond reputeSmokeEater has a reputation beyond reputeSmokeEater has a reputation beyond reputeSmokeEater has a reputation beyond reputeSmokeEater has a reputation beyond repute
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Norman, OK
Posts: 644
Credits: 0.00
Savings: 0.00
A little off subject but...

I was an Interpeter in my church for a Deaf congregation for three years. In the United States (maybe Canada), the most widely used form of sign language is called ASL, or American Sign Language.

When translating English or another language into ASL, you do not translate literally, or word for word. In ASL you try to convey a thought, or a meaning as opposed to an entire sentence or message.

For example, if I were to interpet (in the deaf communitity it is called Interpeting and not Translating) the sentence....

"I went to the store and bought some candy."

In ASL it would be signed/interpeted like this

"Go to store, Candy I bought and ate."

If I remember correctly future, present, and past tenses are more or less understood by the interpeter and the one recieving the sign.

If anyone has read any deaf literature you will see that it is completely different. Why? Because deaf who are brought up with ASL are taught to read ASL. Reading English is very, very, very difficult for them. Almost like reading a foreign language.

I gave up ASL and interpeting because I was forced into it, and I hated my time in the deaf congregation. But being in that enviornment for three years you pick up a thing or two. I was supposed to be NAD-RID certified, but I rebelled against my folk and refused to do it. I would have made some big money too.

Now I've been away for that 5 years, and I've all but forgotten much of it...
__________________
***Edited for explicit content***
SmokeEater is offline   Reply With Quote Share with Facebook