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Old 05-26-2004, 02:30 AM   #9
powwowbum49
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Scott

I do agree with you that with the drum in the middle, it does limit the movement of the dancers and tends to cause, those that have never had the chance to go down to kiowa country for one of the gourd dances, to dance in more of a war dances fashion. But I see this more of a lack of traveling/learning on the dancers part rather than the placement of the drum. Yes, the physical limitation of space and the drum taking up a large area of the floor is problematic, but it can be overcome by the dancers if they choose to.

Some of the things that you mentioned are not just being done but also being taught. I have seen folks outside of Kiowa country teaching others that there are certain ways to dance these songs. That as the song starts, one sort of shuffles from side to side until the first hard beat at which point they slowly dance forward until the tempo picks up. At that point they are to stop and begin 'bouncing'/dancing in place until the next hard beat when they can start moving forward again and so on. Always progressing toward the drum in the middle.

So do the other tribes that also claim to be the originators of the gourd dance, or the tribes/groups that they have given the dance to also have the drum on the side at their dances? I have never attended any of their gourd dances? If so then this could also be the reason that the drum is regularly seen in the middle. And more over, since other tribes also claim gourd dance do/should they also dance it the same as the Kiowa?

Now as to my last question in my prior post. What I was trying to get at was that if every gourd dance you went to was danced just like at Kiowa Gourd Clan, then would the Gourd Clan dance still hold as much meaning, since it's members could then get most of the same things at every other dance they attended? Yes, the every little change can add up over time, but isn't the Gourd Clan dance really a time for the Kiowa's to be Kiowa and celebrate that unity. So then isn't the fact that the dance there is different from most all the others, a good thing?
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PB49

"Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up." Pablo Picasso

"Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, but today is a gift...that is why is it called the Present." Master Oogway - KungFu Panda


My comments are based on what I have been taught and my experiences over the years I have been around the circle. They should in no way be taken as gospel truths and are merely my opinions or attempts at passing on what I have learned while still learning more.
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