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Old 07-02-2004, 04:20 AM   #2
Mato Winyan
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Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Indiana
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Using Fabric Scraps Creatively

When I make a blouse or a top, I keep the scraps in a plastic container.
Later, if I want a different look, I can cut a silhouette out a scrap and
sew it onto a matching skirt, shorts, or slacks.

Mary MacKay


Nothing Goes to Waste

My children enjoy it when I make all of their clothes, as they know that
I’ll use those extra scraps of fabric to make matching doll outfits for
their Barbie and Kelly dolls.
Also, a beautiful collection of fabric samples makes a great gift for older
children (and some adults!). Just include with the fabric some needles, a
small thimble, sewing scissors, a pin cushion, a few spools of colored
thread, and you have presented them with a sewing kit for the budding
seamstress! Just having their own sewing kit gets them excited; this is
also a great way for them to practice their hand stitches.

Helen Cates


Not Enough Fabric for Your Project?

I just ran into this problem last week. I purchased a great piece of
“ Finding Nemo” material to make my granddaughter a shorts set. As it
turned out, the material was only a bit over 3⁄4 of a yard. In making a size
5 set, I needed 1 1⁄4 yards. My next choice was to head for my stash and
find a coordinating material. I had an orange variegated to match the
goldfish in this material, and that is what I used to cut out all of the
facings. With this little trick, a little over 3⁄4 yard was just enough for
a beautiful shorts set.
P. S. If the facing happens to show – it coordinates!

Mary Stiefer


Portable Storage

I am a seamstress and a crafter. I have a sewing area; however, it is in
the family room. I have a storage area where I utilize the clear plastic
hanging shoe storage hangers with 12 to 18 pockets. My crafts are kept in
the clear plastic envelopes and I have one for Halloween, Easter,
Valentine’s Day, Birthdays, etc. and several for Christmas. I installed a
spring-loaded shower curtain rod to hold the hanging storage units; when I
want to work on a project and can transport and easily see my supplies. I
can even transport to the living room, or to the patio when the weather is
nice. This type of storage is also helpful when picking up items out of
season. I can simply locate the appropriate storage unit and place the
items in the clear plastic unit.

Christine Elliott
Dartmouth, NS


Using Children’s Patterns

When using patterns for growing children, cut the pattern to the largest
size and just make a few cuts on the edge; when you need to enlarge the
pattern, use tape to put it back together.
Also, mix and match pattern pieces from different patterns to make new
styles. If it’s the same size, the pieces will be interchangeable.
Simplicity is the easiest patterns to do, even if it’s the night before the
day you need it. I made pattern #5704 from 10 p.m. to midnight Easter Eve.
Everyone loved the dress, and she also wore it for the Spring concert.
Her teacher stopped me just to say how beautiful it was!

H. C. Dooley
I make a lot of children’s clothes for kids and have been since they were
babies. Naturally, I have many multi-sized patterns and would not want to
cut them because I wanted to use them later once the child grew. If you’re
making A LOT of one pattern, I would recommend just making an entire copy
of all the pattern pieces to preserve the pattern pieces, but forgive me, I
was lazy…ha, ha. Rather than do all that, if the edges of the pattern were
straight, I would fold them down to the size I wanted, and if they were
curved, I would put my pins along the size line that I wanted and cut the
fabric under the pattern along the pin line. Just be careful not to cut
the pattern in the process. I therefore achieved what I wanted without
cutting the actual “master” pattern. It has worked WONDERS and takes a lot
less time than making an entire copy. It is worth it if you don’t plan on
making too many of it, as repeated use will eventually cause the pattern to
tear.

Michelle Nelson
Charleston, SC


Planning Projects for Cutting

Recently, I found items for my children that I had cut out last year, but
had never sewn. Now the recipients are older and too big for the items.
Now I plan and cut projects this way:
I look through the stack of patterns that I’d like to make. I choose one
or two larger items, like shirts or pants. I also choose a couple of
smaller gift items that would be quick to make. I only cut out the number
of projects that I think I can complete in 2-3 weeks’ time. When I have
those finished, I schedule another cutting day. I am then more motivated
to finish what I’ve cut out so that I can cut new projects on the next
cutting day.

Kathy Gettig
Michigan


Projects from Concept to Completion

This habit has helped me get more projects from concept to completion.
I often buy my Simplicity patterns when on sale and may not use them for
some time. Too often I’ve lost the inspiration I had to begin with, and
the pattern will gather dust! Finally I came up with a way to hang onto
those originally brilliant ideas.
My fabric store will let me take swatches of the fabric I like; just tiny
ones, but I can still tell what fabric it is. Then I gather whatever
buttons, trims etc. I need and jot a few notes in a notepad I carry in my
purse along with the pattern number. When I get home I put the pattern,
its swatch(es), the notions and notes for that project into a quart-size
Ziploc bag, into my project chest, ready for the next time I’m looking for
something great to make.
I am really enjoying the website! Thanks so much for many hours of happy
sewing!

Pat Chadwick
Wichita, KS
__________________
"We see it as a desecration not only of a mountain but of our way of life. This is a genocidal issue to us. If they kill this mountain, they kill our way of life." ~Debra White Plume
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