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Old 07-28-2004, 02:24 PM   #24
morningstar
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Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Central Coast of Cali
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thestogs
I've used both the powder and liquid Rit dyes with equal success. And yes, rinse with vinegar to set the dye. Dye far more than you think you will need because you will discard a lot of quills that may not be suitable for your project and I find it quite difficult to match dye lots of quills, even when using the same brand and color.

I sort the quills as I do my quillwork since I rarely have time to sit down and pick through bags of quills at another time.

I have two set ups for doing quillwork -- one for home and one for travel. I use a large lap board on which I sort my quills, flattened then, etc. It was part of a kitchen counter! For travel, I take along a smaller block of hardwood -- about 4 inches square -- which gives me plenty of room for flattening quills on a solid surface.

My favorite flattener is a six inch tip of a deer antler. It is very comfortable to work with and flattens quills quite well. I've watched Lakota women use old spoons, finger nails and the antler/bone pieces to flatten quills. Find something that works and have at it.

If you are just getting started, pick up a book or two on the subject. "A Quillworkers Companion" is quite good and I recommend it for someone getting started. Next, thing, invest in some patience. Don't panic when things don't go well to start. Like anything, it takes some time and practice, but once you get comfortable with various techniques, I find it faster than lazy stitch beadwork.

More later if you find it helpful........
you are very helpful!!! Keep posting.....
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