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Old 04-19-2006, 01:47 PM   #13
Wojapi4Me
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Found this information as well:

Setting the Record Straight About Native Peoples: Southern BlackfeetQ: Did the Blackfoot Indians ever live in the South (Georgia, Virginia, the Carolinas, etc.)? Did they ever merge with the Cherokee tribe?
A: It's interesting how often this question comes up. The Blackfoot Indians are people of the Northern Plains--Montana and Alberta, Canada--where they still live to this day. Not only did they never live in the southern states, they were never forced to move to Oklahoma, so they never had close contacts with the Cherokees either before or after the Trail of Tears.

However, during the 1800's, a lot of Native Americans suddenly began to surface in the southeast identified as "Blackfoot" or "Blackfoot-Cherokee." There are several theories as to why. It's been suggested that "Blackfoot" may have just been a popular tribe around then, so great-grandma from South Carolina got remembered as a Blackfoot Princess or something like that, simply because it sounded more glamorous than Catawba. This kind of thing happened more often than you might think (coincidentally enough, many people have been incorrectly identified as Cherokees when they really belonged to some other tribe, as well). A second possibility is that "Blackfoot" may have been kind of a code word for a person of mixed Indian and African heritage. There's an interesting site about this idea here. Finally, I've heard it suggested that local white people may have called the Saponi people of Virginia and North Carolina "Blackfoot" for some reason. There's not a lot of evidence of this, but it's possible. As the Saponi were known for taking in escaped African slaves, perhaps the second and third theories might both be true.
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