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Old 11-15-2006, 09:25 PM   #1
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FAQ: laws about eagle feathers

Office of Law Enforcement

National Eagle Repository
Denver Colorado

Questions and Answers About the National Eagle Repository
For hundreds of years, Native Americans have used eagle feathers for
religious and cultural purposes, including healing, marriage, and naming ceremonies.
In recognition of the significance of these feathers to Native Americans,
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service established the National Eagle Repository
in the early 1970's to provide Native Americans with the feathers of golden
and bald eagles needed for religious purposes.
Denver Museum of Natural History Photo Archives: Shannon Garcia

Can Native Americans collect their own eagle feathers?
No. As a result of years of habitat loss from urbanization, exposure to
chemicals used in agriculture and animal husbandry, and poaching, populations of
bald eagles, the national symbol, and golden eagles have been reduced in
numbers. In an effort to protect these birds, the United States Congress passed
the Bald Eagle Protection Act in 1940, and later amended the Act in 1962 to
include protection for golden eagles. This Act prohibits take, transport,
sale, barter, trade, import and export, and possession of eagles, making it
illegal for anyone to collect eagles and eagle parts without a permit.

When eagles are received at the National Eagle Repository, condition of each
eagle and their feathers is noted, and the species and age is recorded.

How does the National Eagle Repository get the eagles?
The National Eagle Repository serves as a collection point for dead eagles.
Most of the dead golden and bald eagles received by the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service (FWS) have been salvaged by State and Federal wildlife personnel.
Many of these birds have died as a result of electrocution, vehicle
collisions, unlawful shooting and trapping, or from natural causes.
The eagles are shipped to the National Eagle Repository at the Rocky
Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge in Denver, Colorado. Each bird is
assigned a number for tracking and accountability purposes, and information about
each bird is entered into a database. The condition of each eagle and their
feathers is noted, and the species and age is recorded. If part of the bird
or its feathers are missing, damaged, or broken, FWS staff may add replacement
parts from another bird to make it complete. (The recipient is notified
when this is the case prior to shipping). The bird is then stored in a freezer
until it is ready to ship, usually within 3-5 days.
Who can obtain an eagle from the Repository?
Only enrolled members of a Federally recognized tribe can obtain a permit
from the FWS, authorizing them to receive and possess eagle feathers from the
Repository for religious purposes.
How can I obtain an eagle?
The following must be presented when applying for an eagle possession permit:
A completed application obtained from your nearest FWS Regional
Migratory Bird Permit Office.
Certification of tribal enrollment from the Bureau of Indian Affairs
or Tribal Enrollment Office.

On the application, you must specify whether you want a golden or bald
eagle, a mature or immature bird, a whole bird or specific parts, or have no
preference.
You must provide a current telephone number so the Repository staff can
contact you by telephone when your order is ready to ship. Any changes in your
address and/or telephone number must be submitted by you to your local FWS
Regional Migratory Bird Permit Office to keep your file updated.

Eagles are shipped to applicants within 3-5 days after the eagles are
received at the National Eagle Repository.

How long is the wait to obtain an eagle?
Requests for eagles are filled on a first-come, first-serve basis. Eagles
are typically kept at the Repository just long enough to allow FWS personnel
to contact the next applicant on the waiting list, usually 3-5 days. Because
of the large demand and the limited supply, applicants can expect to wait
about 3 and one half years for a whole Bird order to be filled. Approximately
95% of the orders are for whole eagles. Currently, there are over 5000
people on the waiting list for approximately 1000 eagles the Repository receives
each year.
May I apply for more than one eagle?
Again, due to the large demand and the limited supply, each applicant can
apply for only one whole eagle or specific parts equivalent to one bird (i.e.
two wings, one tail, two talons) at a time. Once your request has been
filled, you may reapply to receive another eagle.
May I sell objects made from the eagles feathers?
No. Feathers or parts of bald or golden eagles and other migratory birds
may NOT be sold, purchased, bartered, or traded. They may, however, be handed
down to family members, from generation to generation, or from one Native
American to another for religious purposes. Native Americans CAN NOT give eagle
feathers or parts to non-Native Americans as a gift.

Immature golden eagle tail feathers

Can eagle feathers and parts be imported or exported?
Yes. The 50 Code of Federal Regulations, part 22, has been amended to
provide for the issuance of a permit to import/export eagle feathers for religious
and cultural purposes. Contact your FWS Regional Migratory Bird Permit
Office for application procedures.
How does the National Eagle Repository benefit wildlife?
The salvage efforts of the FWS provides a legal means for Native Americans
to acquire eagle feathers for religious purposes. By providing feathers to
Native Americans, the pressure to take birds from the wild is reduced, thereby
protecting eagle populations.

US Fish and Wildlife Service
Migratory Bird Permit Offices jim

For more information or to obtain an application, contact the nearest U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service, Migratory Bird Permit Office listed below:
Region 1
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Migratory Bird Permit Office/ARW
Eastside Federal Complex
911 N.E. 11th Avenue
Portland, Oregon 97232
(503) 872-2715
Region 2
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Migratory Bird Permit Office
Room 5504
P.O. Box 1306
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87103
(505) 248-7882
Region 3
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Migratory Bird Permit Office
1 Federal Drive, Box 45
Ft. Snelling, Minnesota 55111
(612) 713-5436
Region 4
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Permit Section
1875 Century Boulevard
Atlanta, Georgia 30345
(404) 679-7051
Region 5
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Migratory Bird Permit Office
300 Westgate Center Drive
Hadley, Massachusetts 01035
(413) 253-8641
Region 6
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Migratory Bird Permit Office
P.O. Box 25486, DFC (60130)
Denver, Colorado 80225
(303) 236-8145
Region 7
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Migratory Bird Permit Office
1011 E. Tutor Road, Room 155
Anchorage, Alaska 99501
(907) 786-3693

Contact us:_ [email protected]_ (mailto:[email protected])
_FWS Mountain-Prairie Region Law Enforcement Website_
(http://mountain-prairie.fws.gov/law/le1.html)
_FWS Division of Law Enforcement's National Headquarters_
(http://www.le.fws.gov/)

_FWS Mountain-Prairie Region_ (http://mountain-prairie.fws.gov/)
_National Fish and Wildlife Service Website_
(http://mountain-prairie.fws.gov/)
_Privacy_ (http://www.fws.gov/help/policies.html) _ Department of the
Interior_ (http://www.doi.gov/) _ FirstGov_ (http://firstgov.gov/)
_Freedom of Information Act_ (http://foia.fws.gov/) (FOIA)
_Who We Are_ (http://www.fws.gov/who/index.html) _ Questions/Contact Us_
(http://faq.fws.gov/)
__________________
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