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Old 02-03-2007, 04:29 AM   #6
Blackbear
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http://www.ofo.ca/birdlaw.htm
Endangered Species Act (Ontario)
Ontario's Endangered Species Act (ESA) currently protects 11 species of birds and their habitats in Ontario: American White Pelican, Bald Eagle, Golden Eagle, Peregrine Falcon, King Rail, Piping Plover, Eskimo Curlew, Loggerhead Shrike, Kirtland's Warbler, Prothonotary Warbler and Henslow's Sparrow. Under the ESA, it is prohibited to wilfully kill, injure or interfere with an endangered species, or to interfere with or destroy the habitat of an endangered species. Note that the habitat of an endangered species is also protected! The key word in this Act is "wilfully". Therefore to obtain a conviction, the Crown must prove that the defendant acted intentionally.

Conservation Officers with the MNR are chiefly responsible for enforcement. A person convicted under the ESA "is liable to a fine of not more than $50,000 or to imprisonment for a term of not more that two years, or to both". There is no federal Endangered Species Act in Canada, but one is under consideration.

In addition, the national Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Candada (Cosewic) lists Northern Bobwhite, Barn Owl, and Acadian Flycather as endangered in Ontario but this gives them no extra protection.

http://www.eagles.org/native_american.htm

Under both U.S. and Canadian law, a permit is required from official governmental conservation authorities of anyone to possess an Eagle feather legally. Native American Indians acquiring Bald and Golden Eagle feathers must use them for traditional ceremonies or teaching purposes.

Now this I'm not sure is exactly true.... But it's the MOST I could find on canadian eagle possession laws. Unlike the US though, I believe that you don't have to be native to possess eagle feathers. Until I can find canada's eagle feather laws, I would suggest maybe calling the fish and game in Canada to find out what the exact laws are.
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