Thread: Recent history
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Old 02-08-2007, 10:19 AM   #15
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Location: Land of 370 Broken Treaties
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sookout sh'nob View Post
On the flip side, there are lots of places around James Bay that have just gotten the grass dance within the past five years. I also noticed that in the beginning, nearly all of the people that danced grass were from other reserves and had married into that area and brought the dance with them. Locals were real slow coming around to it, but as more grass dancers started visiting (once they got their powwows up and running) more kids (and it was always kids) came around to grass dancing. Those first generation dancers must be in their early 20s now.

What was most iinteresting to me how all the guys over 30 went straight to traditional dancing, the guys in their 20s went to singing, and the guys under 20 went to grass. It just went that way.

It mimics the patterns that went on when grass dancing became a style in our community back in the 60s too. Before that there was just a sort of "freestyle" or non-bustle dance that looked a lot like old style grass and another bustle style that looked similar to the freestyle, but had it's own vibe as well. This was all in NW Ontario. I don't know that it was the same all over, but that part of the Treaty area does seem to generally move together like that. I think Louis Councilor was one of the first to grass - he was a hoop dancer first though, I think. I'll have to ask him. A lot of guys who had relatives down south seemed to get to it first.
sookout,

Thank you for sharing. Your information is important to the theme of this thread about the recent history of the Grass Dance.

I have also heard stories from the plains Cree and Anishinbe who live near the great lakes of having the grass dance early in their history.

Can anyone from these tribes confirm this?
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