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Old 08-20-2007, 06:55 PM   #81
kiowakat
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kiowakat is a splendid one to beholdkiowakat is a splendid one to beholdkiowakat is a splendid one to beholdkiowakat is a splendid one to behold
Join Date: Jul 2002
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Another group in Missouri ...you decide lol

outside of Springfield Missouri......

http://www.geocities.com/sherian1951/AboutRichard.html

pics here:
Adoption1

Members

Richard J. Craker
501 Farm Road 2030
Monette, MO. 65708
1-417-235-5082
[email protected]

Richard Craker was born in July, 1940, to a native Ozark family from Arkansas and Missouri. He grew up west of Monette, Mo., near where he built the log cabin home where he lives and paints.

Richard’s Cherokee name is Noksi Galagina, which means “Star Buck” in English, was given to him by a mentor and elder, Mr. Elmer Casteel, in the early seventies. Richard is
( a Non-Federal Status) Arkansea-Quapaw/Chickamauga-Cherokee, who is recognized as an “Elder” by the Chickamauga Tribe of Missouri and Arkansas. He is equally proud of his Welsh-Irish/German-American Heritage. Richard has danced in many Indian Pow Wows, and Ceremonies in the Eastern Oklahoma, Southwestern Missouri, and Northwestern Arkansas region.

Richard is an artist who depicts many subjects in several mediums, though he prefers acrylic on canvas. His subjects are largely American Indian Portraits of the late 1700’s and early 1800’s of the Southeastern United States and contemporary Indian dancers. Richard also likes to do occasional seascapes.

Richard is a graduate of Southwest Missouri State University of Springfield, Mo. where he doubled in fine arts major, with an emphasis in Print Making: intaglios, mezzotint, etchings, and stone-lithograph. He taught Art classes in the Ozark’s for a few years, but realized he could earn a better wage in industrial welding. During these years he often drew portraits of co-workers which sold more often than not at company lunch hours. During this time he continued to paint and took several commissions though work, acquaintances, and even received one for a mural in a corporate office. He feels his experience in teaching and using his art talent in industry forced his works to mature. He gives credit to both his wife and daughter who are also artistically talented and regularly critique his paintings at all stages. He was born with heart, spine, and breathing problems. Several surgeries saved his life. Even so, he worked 34 years until a heart attack and increasing degeneration of his upper spine forced his retirement from the labor force.

Richard has had fifty-seven drawings drawings published in books about Indian religion and history and in Pow Wow program booklets. He has developed illustrated teaching flash cards on Cherokee language and drawn illustrations for a children’s book on Pow Wow camping with a Cherokee vocabulary. He was commissioned to do drawings of village life featuring Native American medicinal herbs for an ongoing traveling exhibit.

He has been involved in twenty-five art exhibits and been shown in twelve different galleries. He is pleased to have had several one man shows and been included in Indian art shows like the Tulsa Indian Art Festival, the Trail of Tears Exhibit in Tahlequah, the Five Civilized Tribes Art Market-Art Under the Oaks, Muskogee, all in Oklahoma, the Lawrence (Kansas) Indian Art Market, and the Red Cloud Indian Art Show (Pine Ridge, So. Dakota).

Though he has received a number of blue ribbons and other awards, none has meant
more to him than an honorable mention ribbon and cash prize from the Trail of Tears show and a purchase by the former curator of the Philbrook Art Institue, Robert Johnson.

Richard Craker has his paintings and art prints in his home just six miles S.W. of Monett, Mo. His experience has shown that he can more easily show and sell to a select audience interested in American Indians of the areas of the Five Civilized Tribes

He now has six Limited Edition art prints of interest to Indian art collectors for sale at reasonable prices, as well as a number of orginal acrylic paintings of various subjects. Prices and photographs of recent works may be obtained by serious patrons, collectors, galleries and art establishments by phone or mail.
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