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View Poll Results: who were you taught by to bead?
taught by a family member 77 41.85%
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Forum Home - Go Back > Pow Wow Crafts > Beadwork who were u taught by to bead? who were u taught by to bead?

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Old 02-14-2017, 01:47 PM   #101
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Smile Beadwork Newbie

Only way to learn beading is self taught by books and some videos of youtube. There is nobody nearby who is beading and could teach me.

I have read the books below

Sioux Quill and Beadwork Designs and Techniques by Carrie A. Lawford

Beadwork Techniques of the Native Americans by Scott Sutton

Authentic American Indian Beadwork and How to do it by Pamela Stanley-Millner

North American Indian Beadwork Patterns by Pamela Stanley-Miller


Those I got form CrazyCrow.

And there is the book Traditional Dress by Adolf Hungrywolf.

Some beadwork done with personal meaning to me.

signals.jpg

broken-arrow.jpg

ohrring-feder.jpg

No need to insert a intentional ghost bead yet. I am making unintended real errors.
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Those who do know do not write and those who write may not know. Frank W. Louis, No such Agency

True peace between nations will only happen when there is true peace within people’s souls.
Black Elk

“Tell me, and I will listen.
Show me, and I will understand.
Involve me, and I will learn.”
Lakota Proverb

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
Courage to change the things I can,
And wisdom to know the difference.
Living one day at a time,
Enjoying one moment at a time,
Accepting hardship as a pathway to peace.
(Reinhold Niebuhr, but the origin is debated)
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Old 03-05-2017, 03:22 PM   #102
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bead videos

Learning a craft which is explained and lead by mother, father, grandmother and grandfather is a gift to be treasured as I have seen by example from my father. Nothing better to learn from and get the errors one makes gently corrected and shown how to do it right.

Unfortunately, as far as beading is concerned, I do not enjoy such a favorite learning.

I have to relay on books an videos. As far as books are concerned, they are sold by the trading posts, it seems that most books are written be white people. Finding craft manuals written by the Indians is difficult at best. Sometimes I have the impression that search engines hide interesting links.

The books I have so far red do not educate to a deeper understanding in culture of the ´many tribes which I regret. I have to live with the books as they are.

There are some video's on beading which are helpful.
I found the following video#s helpful:



How to make Brickstitch

Beaded American Flag Earring

How to make mocassins Part I

How to make mocassins Part II

Some of examples of first tries before I entered pow wows:

 photo US-Flag.jpg  photo Confed-Flag.jpg  photo nc-flag-mini.jpg

 photo Elks.jpg


Trying to enlarge the pattern and doing it with square stitch did not yield completely the desired result.

 photo cartridge bag.jpg

As fa as I could observe, beads n0. 10 yellow, light blue, coral red, light brown are quite the same size. Black beads which shall equal n0 10 need to be no. 9. White beads seems to be a blend of n0. 10 and n0. 11.

They are sold in Germayn not in hanks but per 20, 100, 500 or 1000 Gramm.

Some of the first loom beadwork (stripes) I will recover and use the beads sometime in the future on new projects to come but yet not concrete.
__________________
Those who do know do not write and those who write may not know. Frank W. Louis, No such Agency

True peace between nations will only happen when there is true peace within people’s souls.
Black Elk

“Tell me, and I will listen.
Show me, and I will understand.
Involve me, and I will learn.”
Lakota Proverb

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
Courage to change the things I can,
And wisdom to know the difference.
Living one day at a time,
Enjoying one moment at a time,
Accepting hardship as a pathway to peace.
(Reinhold Niebuhr, but the origin is debated)

Last edited by Broken Arrow; 03-05-2017 at 04:17 PM.. Reason: missing words
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Old 03-06-2017, 11:23 AM   #103
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Nice.

However, you really might want to skip the Confederate Battle Flag as a design element in your pieces. It is a controversial symbol in contemporary American society. You will be sending all kinds of messages I doubt you intend or even understand. Not that it matters where you are, I suppose.

One of those off-loom techniques is not one I see often in Native regalia. Understand there are a number of beadworking traditions in the USA. Non-Indian people had techniques they brought with them. And many African techniques are used in the production of modern craft jewelry.


Can I make some suggestions? (Don't keep reading if the answer is no, LOL.)

Buy a clay ball to clean your buckskin. It will help get those pesky pencil marks off. If they're not pencil, throw the dang pen away and never get one near your hides again.

Buckskin cleaning ball

Buy a rotary cutter, like the ones used for cutting strips for quilting, a large clear quilter's ruler and a sheet of plywood. They are indispensable for cutting even fringe. With the clear ruler you can lay out the fringe for cutting without making marks. The rotary cutter will let you make a continuous cuts, unlike scissors. Use the plywood to protect the table and the rough surface helps keep the hid from slipping during cutting. Replace the blade often.

Your fringe attachment method is more mountain man than native. Lacing is used for rawhide, latigo and tooling leather, but not so often on buckskin. Look at these:

Pipe bag

Beadwork by Kevin Fast Horse

Beadwork by Brenda Dubray

Native Art Blog

Yes, different color beads are different sizes. If you want really even beads for loom work, buy Toho's and Miyuki's. Otherwise just pick and cull like the rest of us :) I set aside the extra thick and extra thin beads. When I get to a place with lane (lazy) stitch or rosettes where I have a spacing problem, I can use them to even things out.
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Old 03-06-2017, 11:37 AM   #104
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Patching holes in hides:

If it is a small rip, like the one on your bag, you can darn it.

Thread a needle, I use a beading sharp because often the hide weak around a tear and a glovers needle can do more damage, with Nymo. Turn the bag inside out, draw the edges of the tear together, and put the needle -- at an angle -- through one edge into the other. Don't go all the way through the hide. Tie off the the thread with a surgeon's knot.

Using small stitches, sew the tear shut. Don't go all the way through the hide and watch your tension, so you don't pucker the hide. Knot the other end with a second surgeon's knot. Use Hypo GS or pearl stringing glue to seal the knots.

Turn the bag right side out. Lightly rub the surface with fine sandpaper to even up the texture.

Bigger holes need a patch, which you fit to the hole and sew in the same way.
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Old 03-06-2017, 02:17 PM   #105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OLChemist View Post
Nice.

However, you really might want to skip the Confederate Battle Flag as a design element in your pieces. It is a controversial symbol in contemporary American society. You will be sending all kinds of messages I doubt you intend or even understand. Not that it matters where you are, I suppose.


I did the Confederate Flag once on request as someone I know for years saw the US and Northern Cheyenne Flag I hade made. The turmoil last year about the Confederate Flag made into Germanys main news.

One of those off-loom techniques is not one I see often in Native regalia. Understand there are a number of beadworking traditions in the USA. Non-Indian people had techniques they brought with them. And many African techniques are used in the production of modern craft jewelry.

I have may difficulties with securing the ends of loom beadwork when taking of the loom. I read the description but that isn't the same as watching how it is done in real. The square stitch without loom was easier to me.


Can I make some suggestions? (Don't keep reading if the answer is no, LOL.)

Yes you can. You know that I will for sure read on, especially if you write as what is in ().

Buy a clay ball to clean your buckskin. It will help get those pesky pencil marks off. If they're not pencil, throw the dang pen away and never get one near your hides again.

Buckskin cleaning ball

Thanks for the hint clay ball. It is a pencil grade B, quite soft.
The other marker which works would be a silver pencil for leather.


Buy a rotary cutter, like the ones used for cutting strips for quilting, a large clear quilter's ruler and a sheet of plywood. They are indispensable for cutting even fringe. With the clear ruler you can lay out the fringe for cutting without making marks. The rotary cutter will let you make a continuous cuts, unlike scissors. Use the plywood to protect the table and the rough surface helps keep the hid from slipping during cutting. Replace the blade often.

I first tried a scalpel (fresh blade) with metal ruler but the scalpel did not cut through easily and I took refugee to the scissors. Rotary cutter should be available over here.

Your fringe attachment method is more mountain man than native. Lacing is used for rawhide, latigo and tooling leather, but not so often on buckskin. Look at these:

Pipe bag

Beadwork by Kevin Fast Horse

Beadwork by Brenda Dubray

Native Art Blog

Doing the Fringe in this way is or was an experiment. I would no cut Fringe and tie the sides with some laces or sew them together.

Yes, different color beads are different sizes. If you want really even beads for loom work, buy Toho's and Miyuki's. Otherwise just pick and cull like the rest of us :) I set aside the extra thick and extra thin beads. When I get to a place with lane (lazy) stitch or rosettes where I have a spacing problem, I can use them to even things out.

Ja, there is no other way as sort the thick and thin beads out. At least if using Preciosa beads. Unfortunately over here the colors are not always availabel in sizes which are in need.
I always like to read your posts and enjoy your stile of writing.

I have laying two projects on ice as long as I am not decided how to adjust the rifle scabbard to formal legal necessarity in Germany. It needs a flap which can be closed (locked) but it does not need to be a lock. May be two belts to wrap around an knot or button tied. Or to use some very large beads, Crow Beads?

 photo IMGP0682.jpg

The other unresolved question is the beadwork to apply. There is a bag with two pockets:

 photo IMGP0684.jpg

 photo IMGP0683.jpg

The strap unfinished yet:

 photo IMGP0685.jpg

I should have used the machine to sew the wool cloth but hand sewing seemed more reasonable.
__________________
Those who do know do not write and those who write may not know. Frank W. Louis, No such Agency

True peace between nations will only happen when there is true peace within people’s souls.
Black Elk

“Tell me, and I will listen.
Show me, and I will understand.
Involve me, and I will learn.”
Lakota Proverb

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
Courage to change the things I can,
And wisdom to know the difference.
Living one day at a time,
Enjoying one moment at a time,
Accepting hardship as a pathway to peace.
(Reinhold Niebuhr, but the origin is debated)
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Old 03-06-2017, 02:26 PM   #106
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OLChemist View Post
Patching holes in hides:

If it is a small rip, like the one on your bag, you can darn it.

Thread a needle, I use a beading sharp because often the hide weak around a tear and a glovers needle can do more damage, with Nymo. Turn the bag inside out, draw the edges of the tear together, and put the needle -- at an angle -- through one edge into the other. Don't go all the way through the hide. Tie off the the thread with a surgeon's knot.

Using small stitches, sew the tear shut. Don't go all the way through the hide and watch your tension, so you don't pucker the hide. Knot the other end with a second surgeon's knot. Use Hypo GS or pearl stringing glue to seal the knots.

Turn the bag right side out. Lightly rub the surface with fine sandpaper to even up the texture.

Bigger holes need a patch, which you fit to the hole and sew in the same way.
I did as you described but with artificial sinew, spliced seven times and using only a single thread. On the inside the hole is closed without puckered toe. The hole is not a rectangular cut in the hide but aslant and on the outside larger than the inside. Was my first try and did not work out as expected.

The other option I then saw was to sew a piece of red wool cloth from behind and you would have seen is from the outside. Third option would have been a visible buckskin patch on the outside.

You offer a forth option and I guess that can be done in a way that it is nearly invisible.
__________________
Those who do know do not write and those who write may not know. Frank W. Louis, No such Agency

True peace between nations will only happen when there is true peace within people’s souls.
Black Elk

“Tell me, and I will listen.
Show me, and I will understand.
Involve me, and I will learn.”
Lakota Proverb

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
Courage to change the things I can,
And wisdom to know the difference.
Living one day at a time,
Enjoying one moment at a time,
Accepting hardship as a pathway to peace.
(Reinhold Niebuhr, but the origin is debated)

Last edited by Broken Arrow; 03-06-2017 at 03:10 PM.. Reason: typing error
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Old 03-06-2017, 04:56 PM   #107
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For mending holes, don't use artificial sinew. Use beading thread, it is less visible.

Are you going to turn that bag? In my experience, seams are sewn inside. Both on modern and historical pieces.

On this website, look at these bags:

Newman collection bags

Only rarely is the strip of beadwork hiding a seam with the stitches on the outside. The bag below is unusual in that the seam isn't currently covered. See how it is sewn? Neat tight stitches. The only reason you see them on the outside is years of use has stretched the hide and sinew.

Blue Lakota bag

Note also that on classic Lakota pipe bags, there aren't holes for the ties. They are wrapped around the neck. It is part of the aesthetic of the bag, holes are not visually appealing. And these bags aren't carelessly dangled from strings.

This bag may be sewn with seams on the outside. It is made with harness leather. You can't easily turn it once beaded.

Strikes a Light Bag

Here's a modern example:

Pipebag
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Old 03-06-2017, 05:38 PM   #108
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OLChemist View Post
For mending holes, don't use artificial sinew. Use beading thread, it is less visible.

Aye, I see your point.

Are you going to turn that bag? In my experience, seams are sewn inside. Both on modern and historical pieces.

Yes I am going to turn that bag. Experiment on that bag is sewing the seam with beading thread. Less visible and finer stichtes are possible. It is by the way made according to Frontiersman's Leather Accoutrement Pattern. Originally there is only one pocket but I wanted two for those things essential needed for shooting a flint lock rifle. Powder horn for main charge and priming horn are likewise needed but prohibited to use due to security rules. Can only be for show.

The two part strap needs to be sewn to the bag and the two strap parts need a buckle which allows for adjusting the length of teh combined strap parts.



On this website, look at these bags:

Newman collection bags

Nice, very nice. If I search with the search engines such links don't turn up.


Only rarely is the strip of beadwork hiding a seam with the stitches on the outside. The bag below is unusual in that the seam isn't currently covered. See how it is sewn? Neat tight stitches. The only reason you see them on the outside is years of use has stretched the hide and sinew.

Blue Lakota bag

Note also that on classic Lakota pipe bags, there aren't holes for the ties. They are wrapped around the neck. It is part of the aesthetic of the bag, holes are not visually appealing. And these bags aren't carelessly dangled from strings.

This bag may be sewn with seams on the outside. It is made with harness leather. You can't easily turn it once beaded.

On bags I do not know. The leather for turn shoes which can be turned should not exceed 3 mm and then you must wet it and it is not easily done.

Strikes a Light Bag

Here's a modern example:

Pipebag
They a appealing, nice examples of the old time but the modern example does need to hide. It is a development in tradition from the past into today and the future. It is different and yet not different.


It is a long way to go and you make me think a lot about many point of views and attitude. The longer I stay here, the more I will change. Not really unexpected though quite different then expected.

The offered smileys are joking at me. With every post, there are other smiley for direct access.
__________________
Those who do know do not write and those who write may not know. Frank W. Louis, No such Agency

True peace between nations will only happen when there is true peace within people’s souls.
Black Elk

“Tell me, and I will listen.
Show me, and I will understand.
Involve me, and I will learn.”
Lakota Proverb

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
Courage to change the things I can,
And wisdom to know the difference.
Living one day at a time,
Enjoying one moment at a time,
Accepting hardship as a pathway to peace.
(Reinhold Niebuhr, but the origin is debated)
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