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Old 02-21-2005, 06:42 PM   #21
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Hi Cowboy. I too am a born white man of settler stock of west TX. According to written family history there were small run ins with natives around the Abilene area. I can't change history but I will not disrespect native culture in any way. But what is disrespectful?? There is so much to be learned by all people and I would hope that folks today would be able to come together in a spirit of respect and reconciliation. I would never seek to wear sacred clothes or items of a tribe that I have no relation. BUT If I choose to wear feathers in my long hair; I do it for me. If I sleep in a rock shelter and cook on rocks; I do it for me. When I harvest game and pray for the dead animal spirit I do it for the right reasons. I live my life in a way that your ancestors would be proud and if more europeans thought that way, we would not have the problems that we do today. I see that you are young, Cowboy and I have good hopes that the path will be shown to you through true native wisdom. Keep searching!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 02-23-2005, 09:31 AM   #22
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Im at a lose for words in this particular discussion.I think I need to talk to the elders b4 I reply in depth on this.
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Old 02-25-2005, 08:54 PM   #23
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Lightbulb You might want to do some research first.

Cowboy,
While I admire your desire to do the right thing, it sounds as though you have a bit more to learn before you would be in a position to start educating folks about Comanche lodges, warrior dress and Comanche ways in general.

If you want to learn about Comanche Culture, may I suggest that you begin by contacting representatives within the Comanche Tribe such as:

Tribal Office - Comanche Tribe
P.O. Box 908
Lawton, OK 73502
Phone: (580)492-4988

May I also suggest you look into any number of books that would start to give you a beginning stage of understanding of Comanche Culture, with special emphasis on the books shown in bold:

A Guide to the Indian Tribes of Oklahoma, by Muriel Wright. University of Oklahoma Press, 1986.

American Indian Leaders, edited by R. David Edmunds. University of Nebraska, 1980.

Being Comanche, by Morris W. Foster. University of Arizona Press, 1991.

Border Comanches, translated by Marc Simmons. Stagecoach Press, 1967.

Comanche and Kiowa Captives in Oklahoma and Texas, by Hugh D. Corwin. Cooperative Publishing Co., 1959.

Comanche Barrier to Southern Plains Settlement, by Rupert N. Richardson. 1933.

Comanche Belief and Rituals (thesis), by Daniel J. Gelo. University of New Jersey, Rutgers, 1986.

Comanche Land, by J. Emmor Harston

Comanches in the New West, 1895-1908: Historical Photographs, text by Stanley Noyes with the assistance of Daniel J. Gelo, forward by Larry McMurtry. University of Texas at Austin, 1999.

Comanches: Lords of the South Plains, by Wallace and Hoebel. University of Oklahoma Press. 1986.

Issues In Penatuhkah Comanche Ethnohistory (thesis), by Linda Pelon. University of Texas at Arlington, 1993.

Kiowa, Apache and Comanche Military Societies, by William Meadow. University of Texas Press, 1999.

Los Comanches: The Horse People, by Stanley Noyes. University of New Mexico Press, 1993.

Numa-nu (The Comanche People): Fort Sill Indian School Experience, compiled by Delores Titchywy Sumner. 1981.

Quanah, The Serpent Eagle, by Paul Foreman. Northland Press, 1983.

Quanah Parker, Comanche Chief, by William T. Hagen. University of Oklahoma Press, 1993.

Quanah Parker and His People, by Bill Neeley

Sanapia: Comanche Medicine Woman, by David Jones. Waveland Press, 1972.

Texas Indian Papers, edited by Winfrey & Day (5 volume set). Texas State Historical Association, Austin TX, 1995.

The Story of Comanche Peaks, Landmark of Hood County (TX), by Vance Maloney.

The Comanche Code Talkers of World War II, by William C. Meadows. University of Texas Press, 2003.

The Comanche, by Willard H. Rollings.

The Comanche and His Literature (thesis), by Herwana Becker Barnard. University of Oklahoma, 1941.

The Comanches, A History: 1706-1875, by Thomas W. Kavanaugh. University of Nebraska Press, 1999.

The Last Comanche Chief: The Life and Times of Quanah Parker, by Bill Neeley. John Wiley and Sons, 1995.

United States/Comanche Relations: The Reservation Years, by W. T. Hagan. Yale University Press, 1976.

I hope this helps.
Historian
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Last edited by Historian; 02-25-2005 at 09:09 PM..
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Old 02-25-2005, 09:20 PM   #24
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Historian , Do you have a list of such info for the Tonkawa tribe?
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Old 02-26-2005, 10:49 AM   #25
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Lightbulb Tonkawa Resources

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaping Duck
Historian , Do you have a list of such info for the Tonkawa tribe?
The best resource on the Tonkawa that I know of is a book called:
The Tonkawa People: A Tribal History from Earliest Times to 1893, by Deborah Newlin, The Museum Journal XXI, 1982.
This is the Journal of the West Texas Museum Association at Texas Tech University. Even though the book is out of print, you can probably find a used copy on Ebay.com or Amazon.com

Then there are other books I have heard about, but I don't know what information they can provide:
Tonkawa-They All Stay Together, by Marilee Helton.

The Conquest of the Karankawas and the Tonkawas, 1821-1859 (Elma Dill, Russell Spencer Series in the West and Southwest, No 20) by Kelly F. Himmel, Texas A&M University Press, 1999.

Tonkawa Prehistory: A Study in Method and Theory
by Rudolph C. Troike

A history of the Tonkawa Indians to 1867 by Jason Cannon Abbott

You may also want to consider contacting the following sources:

Tonkawa Historical Society
P.O. Box 366
Tonkawa, OK 74653

The Official Website of the Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma.
http://www.tonkawatribe.com/

Tribal Office
Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma
P.O. Box 70
Tonkawa Ok, 74653
Phone: (580)628-2561
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