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-   -   Women of the Fur Trade Cult (http://forums.powwows.com/f21/women-fur-trade-cult-67411/)

docat 04-09-2013 02:00 AM

Women of the Fur Trade Cult
 
I was looking something up on leather work, and came upon this website, and I have never seen anything quite like this.

These women make historical fur trade items and tan hides and such and camp out. They make historical NDN garments, but I searched the pages, and I don't quite understand why they do this.

In order to become a member, there are tasks they have to do. I saw pix of these women, and they are like Pirates of the Caribbean meets Pocahontas.

Women of The Fur Trade

I'm speechless.

docat 04-09-2013 09:04 AM

Here are pix of the women doing their thing. They call themselves "sisters." They even brought babies in cradleboards out into the wilderness.

Pictures of the Sisters

They did have some warm looking snow moccasins complete with patterns on this site.

Why are they doing this?

blueberry111 04-09-2013 09:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by docat (Post 1572450)
Here are pix of the women doing their thing. They call themselves "sisters." They even brought babies in cradleboards out into the wilderness.

Pictures of the Sisters

They did have some warm looking snow moccasins complete with patterns on this site.

Why are they doing this?

At least they aren't mucking around in powwows. The info on the site is good but the rest and the requirements are a little strange... Where did they get a buffalo?? LOL

docat 04-09-2013 09:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mato-Zi-Win (Post 1572454)
At least they aren't mucking around in powwows. The info on the site is good but the rest and the requirements are a little strange... Where did they get a buffalo?? LOL

"A little strange" is an understatement. LOL Yeah, I was wondering the same thing about the buffalo. Not like they can just cull one from a passing herd.

I wonder if one of the women actually killed it.

Did you read the part where the historical reason that NDN women put paint on their faces was SO THEY DIDN'T GET SUNBURNT? I think that was a HUGE stretch and gave them the ability to keep their very light complexions "historically" intact with all their outdoor activities.

running_with_buffs 04-09-2013 10:25 AM

ha! theres some strange ones out there,looks like wardancers kinda crowd,ha!to each his own i guess,thats how they like to live.thats one of the keen things about this country its free to live how you want,also to make stuff up or even lie..ha! so i know why women in my tribe painted up but maybe out there somewheres out of the 500 plus tribes in north america there was one that did use paint for sunblock,,but yeah litte skeptical on that

Stands Alone 04-09-2013 10:30 AM

Do they actually live this way on a daily basis? I looked at pics...no comment :eek:! Is this some type of retreat? Guess I'll go check out some more of it!

docat 04-09-2013 12:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stands Alone (Post 1572491)
Do they actually live this way on a daily basis? I looked at pics...no comment :eek:! Is this some type of retreat? Guess I'll go check out some more of it!


In order to be a member, you have to go to an encampment 4 x a year in every season. Then there are other mandatory encampments, but I saw somewhere that the eventual goal of them is to live like that on a full time basis.

The physical labor a woman has to do is typical of what an NDN had to do back in 1850.

It's weird, but as far as I can see, one would have to be married to a "mountain man" among other strange rules to qualify. It appears that many NDNs could not qualify. LOL

Eagle Plumes 04-09-2013 12:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by running_with_buffs (Post 1572490)
ha! theres some strange ones out there,looks like wardancers kinda crowd,ha!to each his own i guess,thats how they like to live.thats one of the keen things about this country its free to live how you want,also to make stuff up or even lie..ha! so i know why women in my tribe painted up but maybe out there somewheres out of the 500 plus tribes in north america there was one that did use paint for sunblock,,but yeah litte skeptical on that

Is that some kind of crack at my brother? If so explain yourself please!

running_with_buffs 04-09-2013 01:21 PM

yes sorry if thats your internet brother but it was a crack,i think it explians its self he looks like these mountian men in the pic,so its funny and also true,ha!but thats all it is teasing he likes to tease so do I,but nothing more than teasing

Eagle Plumes 04-09-2013 01:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by running_with_buffs (Post 1572573)
yes sorry if thats your internet brother but it was a crack,i think it explians its self he looks like these mountian men in the pic,so its funny and also true,ha!but thats all it is teasing he likes to tease so do I,but nothing more than teasing

That IS my brother! You are makeing this personal not only my brother but to me and our family, something to wich I do not take lightly. Ive done nothing to you.

running_with_buffs 04-09-2013 01:55 PM

sorry plumes no offense ment towards you just the other guy,peace love and chicken grease!

LeannB 04-11-2013 12:45 PM

Ok, ya'll....I hope I can explain this to you.

Hubby and I for YEARS have done rendezvous and some Living History events. It is a fun hobby, and your kids come out knowing enough history that they drive their teachers nutz. :o)

There are SOME folks who really want to know how folks lived "back then "(insert historical date that they are interested in). There are trekers...here in the USA, they are the folks who go out in the woods for the weekend or even a week, with nothing on their backs but what can be historically (first person) documented (other than a water filter and a turned off cell phone for emergencies, at the bottom of their handsewn linen ruck sacks). Look up John Curry on Google.

There are folks who do this for weekends and weeks at Living history events. There were a tribe of Eastern woodland Indian types at Mansker's Station spring trade fair. Clothing, camping equipment, etc. all documentable to the 18th century. NOTHING was allowed to show in camp on ANY of the participants that wasn't documentable to the 18th century (goggle Mansker's Station, and you'll see what I am talking about). When done right, it makes for an amazing trip back in time.

There are groups like that that "do" Medieval, or Roman, or WWII, or Napoleonic wars, or Civil War....you name it. If you are really interested in an era, NOTHING teaches you about an era like attempting to live it for a weekend or a week. Hands on learning is THE way to learn.

So...enter these gals with their desire to learn about western NDNs. They probably went to Rendezvous where some folks go camping in tipis. They are interested, intrigued. And they want to portray their "Personas" (the kind of persons they are interested in) as correctly as possible. And they are very willing to go to great lengths to do so.

Now, we camp in a tipi at Rendezvous. We spent nearly two weeks in it this January at the Alafia Rendezvous in FL. But we sleep on air mattresses (covered with Hudson Bay blankets and quilts!) , have a plastic bucket potty for late night nature calls (in a period correct bag during daytime!), and several other things at our camp (like canned soup to heat up for a quick lunch, or a toddler sippy cup) that the women of the fur trade wouldn't appreciate. But we camp for FUN and fellowship, esp at the tipi town encampment.

But there are those who I admire for their desire for learning the correct way of doing things. Like the gal who set up her tipi across from us at the Alafia, in 20 minutes, and had her entire camp for her and her granddaughter in one average size sedan (some friends had brought her poles when they brought theirs). One tiny igloo cooler was all the concession she made for the 21rst century. They slept on buffalo robes and the same outfits for several days at a time. Wooden and horn utensils. They must enjoy it...they keep coming back!

It's kinda hard to understand if you aren't VERY interested in history. And I am VERY sure that the folks don't mean it as disrespect. They are just interested in the time period and want to KNOW what it was like.

I found the Women of the Fur trade site about a year ago, and have enjoyed it. They EXPLAIN how to make the dresses they wear. And while we are Shawnee, we enjoy camping in a tipi (it's a real pain to take a woodland's wikiup to camp, altho I have seen it done). And while I am in a tipi, I dress in plains NDN clothing (just to fit in with the tipi, and as a nod of respect to the tipi's creators). Ribbon dresses, a three hide dress, and am considering a wool dress (a la the pattern at Women of the Fur trade site). I already have the green wool, and the cowry shells for decoration.

Doesn't mean I am Sioux, or Cheyenne. But haven't any of you ever wanted to go back in time, for just a bit, and live like some interesting person in history lived? Just for a weekend, or a week?

docat 04-11-2013 01:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeannB (Post 1573284)
Ok, ya'll....I hope I can explain this to you.

Hubby and I for YEARS have done rendezvous and some Living History events. It is a fun hobby, and your kids come out knowing enough history that they drive their teachers nutz. :o)

There are SOME folks who really want to know how folks lived "back then "(insert historical date that they are interested in). There are trekers...here in the USA, they are the folks who go out in the woods for the weekend or even a week, with nothing on their backs but what can be historically (first person) documented (other than a water filter and a turned off cell phone for emergencies, at the bottom of their handsewn linen ruck sacks). Look up John Curry on Google.


Wow, thanks for explaining that. I had never seen anything like this! Blonde women with blonde babies in cradleboards and such. I was like, what's going on here? LOL

I did like their instructions on moccasins for cold weather. I suppose if you are actually in the weather, you can also modify and work with what does work and what doesn't work.

Well, I had never seen anything like this. I have been to a Rendezvous before along the Mississippi river and they are generally French vs. British with a few Americans tossed in...a weekend tops. Sometimes they have NDNs, but not very many...at least in what I saw. If someone was dressed like an NDN, the person really looked to be Native and I figured they got some Natives to come in and do that.

Wow, wearing all that wool in the heat must be brutal.

But did you see--I'm not talking the new people--but the people who are established in the group, those women are physically fit! I mean, they have been out there working the work instead of talking the talk. It's gotten them in shape.

I did not know that that is what they were doing. Thanks for explaining. It just looked crazy to me, like they were playing around.

When I go on vacation, I want an air conditioned hotel room and a casino nearby. LOL

blueberry111 04-11-2013 06:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeannB (Post 1573284)
Ok, ya'll....I hope I can explain this to you.

Hubby and I for YEARS have done rendezvous and some Living History events. It is a fun hobby, and your kids come out knowing enough history that they drive their teachers nutz. :o)

There are SOME folks who really want to know how folks lived "back then "(insert historical date that they are interested in). There are trekers...here in the USA, they are the folks who go out in the woods for the weekend or even a week, with nothing on their backs but what can be historically (first person) documented (other than a water filter and a turned off cell phone for emergencies, at the bottom of their handsewn linen ruck sacks). Look up John Curry on Google.

There are folks who do this for weekends and weeks at Living history events. There were a tribe of Eastern woodland Indian types at Mansker's Station spring trade fair. Clothing, camping equipment, etc. all documentable to the 18th century. NOTHING was allowed to show in camp on ANY of the participants that wasn't documentable to the 18th century (goggle Mansker's Station, and you'll see what I am talking about). When done right, it makes for an amazing trip back in time.

There are groups like that that "do" Medieval, or Roman, or WWII, or Napoleonic wars, or Civil War....you name it. If you are really interested in an era, NOTHING teaches you about an era like attempting to live it for a weekend or a week. Hands on learning is THE way to learn.

So...enter these gals with their desire to learn about western NDNs. They probably went to Rendezvous where some folks go camping in tipis. They are interested, intrigued. And they want to portray their "Personas" (the kind of persons they are interested in) as correctly as possible. And they are very willing to go to great lengths to do so.

Now, we camp in a tipi at Rendezvous. We spent nearly two weeks in it this January at the Alafia Rendezvous in FL. But we sleep on air mattresses (covered with Hudson Bay blankets and quilts!) , have a plastic bucket potty for late night nature calls (in a period correct bag during daytime!), and several other things at our camp (like canned soup to heat up for a quick lunch, or a toddler sippy cup) that the women of the fur trade wouldn't appreciate. But we camp for FUN and fellowship, esp at the tipi town encampment.

But there are those who I admire for their desire for learning the correct way of doing things. Like the gal who set up her tipi across from us at the Alafia, in 20 minutes, and had her entire camp for her and her granddaughter in one average size sedan (some friends had brought her poles when they brought theirs). One tiny igloo cooler was all the concession she made for the 21rst century. They slept on buffalo robes and the same outfits for several days at a time. Wooden and horn utensils. They must enjoy it...they keep coming back!

It's kinda hard to understand if you aren't VERY interested in history. And I am VERY sure that the folks don't mean it as disrespect. They are just interested in the time period and want to KNOW what it was like.

I found the Women of the Fur trade site about a year ago, and have enjoyed it. They EXPLAIN how to make the dresses they wear. And while we are Shawnee, we enjoy camping in a tipi (it's a real pain to take a woodland's wikiup to camp, altho I have seen it done). And while I am in a tipi, I dress in plains NDN clothing (just to fit in with the tipi, and as a nod of respect to the tipi's creators). Ribbon dresses, a three hide dress, and am considering a wool dress (a la the pattern at Women of the Fur trade site). I already have the green wool, and the cowry shells for decoration.

Doesn't mean I am Sioux, or Cheyenne. But haven't any of you ever wanted to go back in time, for just a bit, and live like some interesting person in history lived? Just for a weekend, or a week?

Yes, I do understand it now, the requirements. It weeds out the people unwilling to follow the true old ways! :teeth_smi
What really amazes me is wearing moccasins in the snow. I always hate wet mocs.

running_with_buffs 04-11-2013 06:57 PM

i just wonder what the use for "o" paper

docat 04-11-2013 08:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mato-Zi-Win (Post 1573390)
Yes, I do understand it now, the requirements. It weeds out the people unwilling to follow the true old ways! :teeth_smi
What really amazes me is wearing moccasins in the snow. I always hate wet mocs.

THey treat them, Mato-zi-win! If you read the moccasin section, which is really good, they tell you how to waterproof them. They are running all around in the snow without issue. They figured it out!!

LeannB 04-11-2013 09:12 PM

snip......
Quote:

Originally Posted by docat (Post 1573292)


When I go on vacation, I want an air conditioned hotel room and a casino nearby. LOL

LOL! Yeah, some folks think Living History folks are kinda nutz....but if you do it right, it can be almost magical. Esp. at night, with the lanterns lit and the smell of clean wood smoke and the guitars and fiddles and dulcimers playing, and off in the distance....several drums taking their turns at playing.

VERY Kool.

LeannB 04-11-2013 09:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mato-Zi-Win (Post 1573390)
Yes, I do understand it now, the requirements. It weeds out the people unwilling to follow the true old ways! :teeth_smi
What really amazes me is wearing moccasins in the snow. I always hate wet mocs.

YUP. You got it!

Yeah, wet mocs are a BUMMER. I've never worn them in the snow; the coldest we have ever camped was in the twenties at FL (no snow, just lotsa frost...). I have heard if you keep them well greased, it helps a bunch. I know a coat of mink oil helps. That stuff helps my old faithful Dyer Mocs keep up with a hard week of walking.

docat 04-11-2013 09:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeannB (Post 1573498)
snip......

LOL! Yeah, some folks think Living History folks are kinda nutz....but if you do it right, it can be almost magical. Esp. at night, with the lanterns lit and the smell of clean wood smoke and the guitars and fiddles and dulcimers playing, and off in the distance....several drums taking their turns at playing.

VERY Kool.


And I'm thinking of a different kind of magical...the slots jingling and the jackpots dinging and the BRIGHT LIGHTS and the good food and the atmosphere that anybody here tonight could make it RICH!!!!! LOL

LeannB 04-11-2013 09:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by running_with_buffs (Post 1573392)
i just wonder what the use for "o" paper

Leaves, I would suppose. Mullein is good for that, I hear. Watch out for poison ivy, tho'.....:eek:


I'd want a bar of homemade soap handy, tho', to wash with. THAT'S period. I'm sure these gals have figured all of that out. They've BTDT.


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