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Old 01-06-2009, 07:22 PM   #21
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the 1960s Grass dance costume was published again at "Lakota Books", 1994

It is the same or?

Oh-- as I see now, it is not the same- they just have Horward as a source.....
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Old 01-06-2009, 09:42 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elke View Post
the 1960s Grass dance costume was published again at "Lakota Books", 1994

It is the same or?

Oh-- as I see now, it is not the same- they just have Horward as a source.....
???
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Old 01-07-2009, 11:47 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elke View Post
the 1960s Grass dance costume was published again at "Lakota Books", 1994

It is the same or?

Oh-- as I see now, it is not the same- they just have Horward as a source.....
You seem to be talking about the following...

1965. Grass Dance Costume, by William K. Powers, Pow-Wow Trails Magazine, (reprinted by Lakota Books in 1994).

This is available at:
Lakota Product 1


While speaking of the writings of Bill Powers, you might also look at:

Powers, William K.
1962. The Sioux Omaha Dance. American Indian Tradition Newsletter, Vol. 8, No. 3.
1990. War Dance: Plains Indian Musical Performance. University of Arizona Press, Tucson, AZ.
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Old 01-30-2009, 09:15 AM   #24
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Some old photos showing Omaha/Grass Dancers and Mess Bustles among a number of different tribes.

Oglala Lakota - 1892


Oglala Lakota - 1892


Oglala Lakota - 1892


Oglala Lakota - 1892


Lakota - no date


Lakota - no date


Lakota - no date


Omaha - no date


Blackfoot - no date


Yakima - 1903


Nez Perce - 1900


Nez Perce - 1900


HoChunk - 1887
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Old 01-30-2009, 12:38 PM   #25
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So ive been paying attention to alot of the chicken dancers flooding into florida while I was there visiting, the mess bustles and Chicken Bustles are very close, So I guess wat im trying to say is these styles are somewhat related, or maybe not at all? any feedback?
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Old 01-30-2009, 02:32 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ego-hut-key View Post
So ive been paying attention to alot of the chicken dancers flooding into florida while I was there visiting, the mess bustles and Chicken Bustles are very close, So I guess wat im trying to say is these styles are somewhat related, or maybe not at all? any feedback?
the modern chicken dance can trace its roots back to a common dance form ancestor as the modern traditional dancer, back to pre-reservation men's dance societies (and their accompanying regalia). While there were distinct tribal traditions as well as dance form, there was a basic dance form with regalia that was common throughout the Great Plains and certain close neighbors in the 1700s and 1800s. In one area, say Blackfeet/Cree, the ancestor dance form became chicken, in North dakota it "evolved" into Grass dance, in SD it evolved into traditional. There is a "core" to every northern style outfit, you add things to it to make the various individual dance styles.
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Old 02-04-2009, 11:21 AM   #27
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Hah!

Well spoken!

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ohhh... you don't have to like me.....

but we have good museum collections here-- for the old stuff.
going back to the 1840s-- Like Berlin-Dahlem Museum....


Best regards from Elke
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Old 02-04-2009, 02:45 PM   #28
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Dancer at Craterville Park, Oklahoma - cira 1924-1932
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Last edited by Historian; 02-06-2009 at 12:20 PM.. Reason: Date of photo correction.
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Old 02-04-2009, 03:04 PM   #29
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Dancer at Craterville Park, Oklahoma - 1910

an early 1900s version of a classic, notice how the tail is still a part of the bustle, but the rest of the bird has been modified/replaced. In this example the bird has become the two small mess bustles around each of the uprights, and I love the small neck bustle (which is the ancestor of the modern fancy dance top bustle). We don't see too many neck bustles on contemp trad guys up in these parts, except for Jim Red Eagle, is that who I'm thinking of, from up in Saskatchewan.
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Old 02-06-2009, 10:59 AM   #30
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Dancer at Craterville Park, Oklahoma - 1910
I suspect the date on this photography is incorrect, the all-Indian Fair at Craterville Lake did not begin until the mid-1920s, I believe 1924 off the top of my head. It was started by Frank Rush and a group of KCA folks.
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Old 02-06-2009, 12:15 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iowa_Boy View Post
I suspect the date on this photography is incorrect, the all-Indian Fair at Craterville Lake did not begin until the mid-1920s, I believe 1924 off the top of my head. It was started by Frank Rush and a group of KCA folks.

Iowa_Boy,

I did some research and found that you are correct. The All Indian Fair at Craterville was from 1924-1932, as can be seen in the article below.

Good catch Iowa_Boy, thanks.


In an article by Muriel H. Wright titled The American Indian Exposition in Oklahoma published in "Chronicles of Oklahoma, No. 24, Summer, 1946," she states:

"An outstanding, summer entertainment feature has developed in the American Indian Exposition held annually at Anadarko, in Caddo County"...

..."The American Indian Exposition was first formed with a constitution and by-laws as an all-Indian organization in 1933,"...

..."The first celebration was held the same year, September 13-16, in connection with the Caddo County Fair"...

..."The American Indian Exposition was a new and separate organization, having been formed by Indians living in and around Anadarko, yet the plan for such an organization was the outgrowth of the All-Indian Fair which had been held at Craterville Park for some years. Frank Rush, owner of Craterville Park which is located about sixteen miles west of Lawton, had first sponsored an all-Indian fair in 1924."

"Thereafter this fair was held annually and widely advertised for its special entertainment and agricultural exhibits displayed by the Indians of Southwestern Oklahoma up to and including 1932"...

..."The following year (1932) saw the ninth and last annual celebration at Craterville Park. "
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Old 02-09-2009, 11:58 AM   #32
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In the earliest versions of the Hethuska dance ceremony, some dancers among the Omaha/Ponca were entitled to wear a feathered bustle called the Kaxe’ or “Crow.”

A description of the early form of this feather bustle can be seen in the work titled Hae-thu-ska Society of the Omaha Tribe, which appeared in the Journal of American Folk-lore published in 1892, and it states,

"The Leader and other men distinguished for their skill and success in war, wore an ornament called Ka-hae, or ‘Crow’. This was made of two sticks like arrow shafts, painted green, and feathered like the stems of the fellowship pipes, with feathers of the buzzard; tufts of crow plumage and long pendants reaching nearly to the ground, made of crow’s feathers completed this ornament, which was worn at the back fastened to the belt, the two shafts rising to the man’s shoulder blades. The men wearing the Ka-hae; painted the front of their bodies and their arms and legs with daubs of black; their faces and backs were completely covered with black paint, but on their backs, white spots were put on the black color.

Comparatively few men attained sufficient eminence as warriors to wear the Ka-hae and paint themselves in this manner. The blackened face and dappled limbs and front were emblematic of the thunder clouds and their destructive power as they advance over the heavens, even as the warrior approaches his victim dealing his death-darts. The blackened back with it’s white spots indicated the dead body of the enemy, which the birds were busy pecking, leaving their droppings as they tore away the fast-decaying flesh. The crow was worn, as it was said to be the first to find a corpse, and later was joined by other birds of prey. The tuft of grass worn by all the members of the Hae-thu-ska bore a twofold signification: it represented the tail of the Me-ka-thu, or wolf, the animal closely allied to the warrior, and it also symbolized the scalp of the vanquished enemy.

There are two classes of warlike deeds, which are distinguished in according honors:

1st. Nu ah-tah’-the-sha. Literally the words mean, in the direction of men, signifying that the warrior has gone forth seeking men to fight; one whose warfare has been aggressive, and away from home.

2nd. Wa-oo ah-tah’-the-sha, or Tee ah-tah’-the-sha. Literally the words mean, in the direction of woman, or in the direction of the tent or home; defensive warfare, as when the camp or village has been attacked and valorously defended. Only men of the first class, those whose aggressive warfare has become noted, and confirmed through the ceremonies of the Tent of War, are eligible to the office of Leader, or permitted to wear the Ka-hae and paint in black as already described."

(Fletcher, 1892, pp. 138-139)

By 1911, Alice Fletcher and Francis LaFlesche described the feather bustle or “the Crow,” in a work titled The Omaha Tribe, in the following way,

“A man who had attained more than once to honors of the first three grades became entitled to wear a peculiar and elaborate ornament called ‘the Crow.’ This was worn at the back, fastened by a belt around the waist; it was made with two long pendants of dressed skin painted red or green, which fell over the legs to the heels. On the skin were fastened rows of eagle feathers arranged to hang freely so as to flutter with the movements of the wearer. An entire eagle skin, with head, beak and tail formed the middle ornament; from this rose two arrow shafts tipped with hair dyed red. On the right hip was the tail of a wolf; on the left the entire skin of a crow.”...

...“The ‘Crow’ decoration is said to symbolize a battlefield after the conflict is over. The fluttering feathers on the pendants represented the dropping of feathers from the birds fighting over the dead bodies. Sometimes the wearer of ‘the Crow’ added to the realism by painting white spots on his back to represent the droppings of the birds as they hovered over the bodies of the slain. The two arrow shafts had a double significance; they represented the stark bodies and also the fatal arrows standing in a lifeless enemy. The eagle was associated with war and with the destructive powers of the Thunder and attendant storms. The wolf and the crow were not only connected with carnage but they had a mythical relation to the office of ‘soldiers,’ (wa-noN’-she) the designation given to certain men on the annual tribal hunt, who acted as marshals and kept the people and the hunters in order during the surround of the herd. These men were chosen from those who had the right to wear ‘the Crow’ and this regalia was generally worn at that time. It was worn also at certain ceremonial dances.”

(Fletcher & LaFlesche, 1911, pp. 441-442)


Fletcher, Alice C.
1892. Hae-thu-ska Society of the Omaha Tribe. Journal of American Folk-lore, Vol. 5, No. 17, American Folk-Lore Society, Boston, MA.

Fletcher, Alice C. and Francis LaFlesche.
1911. The Omaha Tribe. Bureau of American Ethnology, 27th Annual Report 1905-06, Smithsonian Institution, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.

It should be noted that while these descriptions are the result of talking with many Omaha people in the late 1800s and early 1900s, the descriptions portray a limited viewpoint.

It should also be noted that Francis LaFlesche, (French/Ponca/Iowa/Omaha, b. 1857 - d. 1932) was the son of an Omaha Chief named Iron Eye (aka Joseph LaFlesche). Iron Eye had become the adopted son of Chief Big Elk of the Omaha, and Big Elk personally selected Iron Eye as his successor.

Francis LaFlesche not only worked with Alice Fletcher to interpret Omaha tribal culture for Western ethnologists, but also did independent research on the music and rituals of the Osage, who are closely related to the Omaha. In addition, Francis LaFlesche was on the professional staff of the Smithsonian Institution’s Bureau of American Ethnology from 1910 until 1929.
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Old 02-10-2009, 05:43 AM   #33
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I'm workin on a more old style bustle right now. Not fully mess style, nice round black n white tail bustle, but on the inside I want a mixed messy center. just gotta get the hang of this rit dye, then split the feathers up to make em nice and floppy. will get some pics when I'm done.

The whole giant 2 bird wing bustles just don't appeal to me at all anymore. The smaller the better
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Old 02-11-2009, 10:39 AM   #34
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Keeps The Mountain - Oglala Lakota - 1898


Lakota - 1915
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Old 02-11-2009, 07:03 PM   #35
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I wonder if all this information can be added to those FAQ forums on PWs.com, but this is all good, I showed my uncles these pictures, they all got smiles on there faces said it brought back memories from when they were kids, Its cool to see all this information and pictures, I appreciate all the feedback, Thank You all.
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Old 02-22-2009, 08:06 PM   #36
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Two Omaha men wearing "mess" bustles (aka "crow belt"). - 1907

I followed the directions posted and checked out the photo and one and a half days later it was done. This is the first bustle that I ever made. I gave it to my husband Phil....

Photobucket
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Old 02-23-2009, 10:06 PM   #37
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Well alot of awesome feedback, and you should of seen my uncle earlier, when he saw all the photos, like a kid in a candyshop or something, Im making a chicken dance bustle but old style for my nephew, any tricks and tips out there, how are all the gals and guys making there mess bustles for themselves or there men? (I know I use clothespins to hold the leather and wet glue to the quill while it drys, I also use the plastic wheels at walmart with all the wholes in them, well thats what I was learning watching my uncles.)
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Old 02-23-2009, 10:19 PM   #38
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I always do mine like feather hats, I always use a buckskin loop, but I take a needle and thread, and sew right through the leather and the feather quill. I never trust just glue. Seen things get hot and get loose. Especially tape.

I keep seeing dead owls on the road, so I think Im gonna make a mess bustle out of em sometime if I start collecting them. Talked with enough of my elders who say it is alright here, and that the negative superstitions in these parts were borrowed from other tribes.
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Old 02-23-2009, 10:30 PM   #39
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Yea, my uncles told me, owls are warriors of the knight, that there to protect and warn you. but I've heard and respect the stories about the owl of other tribes. post a picture when your done, I thinks thatd be awesome lookin, thanks.
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Old 02-23-2009, 10:32 PM   #40
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i ment night not knight, sorry, watching the movie kingdom of heaven, lol
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