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Old 12-18-2005, 03:50 AM   #1
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Post Anishnawbe people

Anishnawbe have a history that dates back to 50.000 years ago in North America (Turtle Island).

It has been many years since Anishnawbe people, were one with there surroundings. Anishnawbe and other Native American have been through a lot since the Europeans arrived on Turtle Island, the robbing of our culture, other beliefs shoved down our face.

Anishnawbe still as a people have a strong connection with God, (Gitchie - Manito) Great Spirit and no one will break that connection and bond.

The Anishnawbe people long ago and today believe that all living things have a "Spirit" within, a life force that is within all living things. The human mind is limited to understanding the fundamental concepts and many other
concepts about this world. Meaning: there is life all around us the Spirit World on this earth, sun, space, stars, and the universe etc.

After death, when we are in the "Spirit form" we will have a greater understanding about the world around us and that our question about life will be answered.

One of the greatest gift that the Great Creator give man and woman were to respect, love and to help one another. Life is very important.

The Anishnawbe people have many ceremonies, which are practice today. For example, a list of these ceremonies that are still practiced are: the Shaken tent, Sweat lodge, Vision quest, Talking drum ceremony and the Ma-day-win (Grand Medicine Lodge). There are many difference types of sweat lodge ceremonies. We also have the Seven Grand Father teachings (Sevens fires) to keep us in order.

The Meaning of the Anishnawbe Word Anishnawbe -Meaning of this word, First people, Original people, whence
lowered the male of the species, First man. In many books and websites, they state that we are Algonquin stock. However, they are incorrect, we recognize our selves as Anishnawbe. Ojibways, Ojibwa, Ojibwe, Ojicree, Cree, Chippewa, Potawatomi and Algonquin, etc. and we speak the Anishnawbe language. Lenni Lenape is another way to say Anishnawbe in old form. Many of Anishnawbe people were a big family at one time, before the whites came to this land.


To learn more go to the Mi-day-win ceremony and to other ceremonies and listen to the elders speak and you will learn the history and values of the people. The teachings I talk about are not my words, but from the elders stories. Many of us know these old stories and other stories that have been past down from generation to generation.
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Old 12-18-2005, 08:13 AM   #2
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You know what I know about the anishanawbe people? there's a lot of you ROFLMAO!
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Old 12-18-2005, 10:17 AM   #3
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Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackbear
You know what I know about the anishanawbe people? there's a lot of you ROFLMAO!
Ok i am not that good with short forms. what does ROFLMAO mean?
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Old 12-18-2005, 10:21 AM   #4
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Question ok never mind

This Accumulation of letters means Rolling on Floor Laughing My *** Off, However why?
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Old 12-18-2005, 11:39 AM   #5
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Language: Algonquin is the language for which the Algonquian language family is named. This has caused great confusion, and makes it very difficult to find the actual Algonquin language on the Internet: many sites incorrectly identify other Algonquian languages as Algonquin or the Algonquin language simply as Algonquian, and some people even claim there is no such thing as an "Algonquin" language. In fact there is, and it is spoken by about 3000 people in Quebec and Ontario. "Algonquin" refers to that language and no other, while "Algonquian" refers to the entire language family Algonquin is a part of. It's no different than "German" referring to a language and "Germanic" referring to a language family, and once you understand how the terms are used it's no harder to keep straight. The Algonquin Indian language is verb-based and closely related to Ojibwe. Some even consider it an Ojibwe dialect, since speakers can roughly understand each other. The situation is similar to that of Spanish and Italian speakers in Europe. Certainly the two languages are close enough in structure and vocabulary that a language learner frustrated with the dearth of Internet resources for Algonquin might want to check out the many links on our Ojibwe page; knowing one language, you can usually make your way in the other. Algonquin is not related to Ancient Egyptian, Hebrew, or other semitic languages; this data was faked.

People: There are about 8000 Algonquin Indians in Canada today, organized into nine nations in Quebec and one nation in Ontario. The origin of the word "Algonquin" (or Algonkin) is uncertain. It's often said to be a Mohawk insult meaning "bark-eater," but that's not true--not that the Mohawk didn't call their enemies bark-eaters (they did), but the Mohawk word in question was "Adirondack." "Algonquin" isn't a Mohawk word, and its origins are a matter of pure speculation. The Algonquins call themselves "Anishnabe" or "Anishnabek" (the original people) in their own language, just as their kinfolk the Ojibwa, Ottawa, and Potawatomi do, but use the word "Algonquin" to differentiate themselves from these other tribes, from whom they have always maintained political independence.

History: The Algonquin Indians were less victims of the European invaders than of unfortunate politics. The banding together of the Iroquois Confederacy had beaten the Algonquins back from lands that had once been theirs when the French arrived looking for furs and offering firearms. The Algonquins jumped at the deal; however, though the French were good friends to the Algonquins, they did not make such good allies, and the powerful Iroquois, aided first by the Dutch and later by the English, defeated the French and Algonquins alike. Though they were defeated, they were never destroyed, and the Algonquin people have been able to maintain their culture unbroken in pockets of their once-vast holdings.
http://www.native-languages.org/algonquin.htm
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Old 12-18-2005, 11:53 AM   #6
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Post http://www.native-languages.org/ojibwe.htm

Language:: Ojibwe--otherwise anglicized as Chippewa, Ojibwa or Ojibway and known to its own speakers as Anishinabe or Anishinaabemowin--is an Algonquian language spoken by 50,000 people in the northern United States and southern Canada. There are five main dialects of Ojibwe: Western Ojibwe, Eastern Ojibwe, Northern Ojibwe (Severn Ojibwe or Oji-Cree), Southern Ojibwe (Minnesota Ojibwe or Chippewa), and Ottawa (Odawa or Odaawa). Speakers of all five dialects, including Ottawa, can understand each other readily. Many linguists also consider the Algonquin language to be an Ojibwe dialect, but it has diverged more and is difficult for Western Ojibwe speakers to understand. As its name suggests, Oji-Cree has borrowed many elements from Cree and is often written in the Cree syllabary rather than the English alphabet. On the whole Ojibwe is among the healthiest of North American languages, with many children being raised to speak it as a native language.

People: The Ojibwe are one of the most populous and widely distributed Indian groups in North America, with 150 bands throughout the north-central United States and southern Canada. Ojibwe and Chippewa are renderings of the same Algonquian word, "puckering," probably referring to their characteristic moccasin style. "Chippewa" is more commonly used in the United States and "Ojibwe" or "Ojibway" in Canada, but the Ojibwe people themselves use their native word Anishinabe (plural: Anishinabeg), meaning "original people." The Saulteaux and Mississauga are subtribes of the Ojibwe; the Ottawa, though they are closely related and speak the same language, have long held the status of a distinct tribe. Today there are 200,000 Ojibwe Indians living throughout their traditional territories.

History: The Ojibwe and Ottawa Indians are members of a longstanding alliance also including the Potawatomi tribe. Called the Council of Three Fires, this alliance was a powerful one which clashed with the mighty Iroquois Confederacy and the Sioux, eventually getting the better of both. The Ojibwe people were less devastated by European epidemics than their densely-populated Algonquian cousins to the east, and they resisted manhandling by the whites much better. Most of their lands were appropriated by the Americans and Canadians, a fate shared by all native peoples of North America, but plans to deport the Ojibwe to Kansas and Oklahoma never succeeded, and today nearly all Ojibwe reservations are within their original territory
http://www.native-languages.org/ojibwe.htm
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Old 12-18-2005, 12:01 PM   #7
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Post http://www.native-languages.org/cree.htm

Language: Cree is an Algonquian language spoken by more than 45,000 people across southern Canada and into Montana. There are five major Cree dialects: Western/Plains Cree, Northern/Woodlands Cree, Central/Swampy Cree, Moose Cree, and Eastern Cree. Some linguists consider these distinct languages, but they are largely mutually intelligible. The most divergent is Eastern Cree, which some consider a closer relative to the Innu languages Montagnais and Naskapi than to the other Cree dialects--then again, others consider Montagnais, Naskapi, and/or Attikamekw to be dialects of Cree themselves. This lack of linguistic consensus reveals the remarkable diversification of the Cree language. In general, Cree people can understand the dialects of communities closest to them, but not those further away: though a Northern Cree may understand both a Western Cree and an Eastern Cree, they might have trouble understanding each other, and only the East Cree speaker would have hope of understanding Montagnais. All five Cree dialects (though not Atikamekw or the Innu languages) are written in a unique syllabary which uses shapes to represent consonants and rotates them in the Four Directions to represent vowels. (It is a common belief that missionaries invented this syllabary, but that is highly unlikely; see here for a discussion of this myth.) There are two more languages which, while not Cree, are heavily influenced by Cree: Michif, a Metis creole combining French nouns with Cree verbs, and Severn Ojibway, an Ojibwe dialect often called "Oji-Cree" because it has borrowed liberally from Cree and uses the Cree syllabary instead of the Roman alphabet used by most other Ojibwe speakers. One of the most important and influential of American Indian languages, Cree also has one of the best chances of conitnued survival, with many children being raised bilingually or in Cree with English or French as a second language.

People: The Cree are Canada's largest native group, with 200,000 registered members and dozens of self-governed nations. "Cree" comes from the French name for the tribe, "Kristenaux," variously said to be a corruption of the French word for "Christian" or an Algonquian word for "first people." When speaking their own language the Cree refer to themselves as Ayisiniwok, meaning "true men," or Iyiniwok, Eenou, Iynu, or Eeyou, meaning simply "the people" (these words have the same Central Algonquian root as the Montagnais word Innu). There are also more than 100,000 people known as Métis, of mixed-blood Cree, French, and other Canadian ancestry. Though many Cree regard the Metis as Cree brethren--and, indeed, though many registered Cree Indians are also mixed-blood--the Metis have a unique culture and their own creole tongue (known as Michif). The Atikamek and the Innu (Montagnais and Naskapi) are also related to the Cree but consider themselves distinct.

History: Cree history is very hard to synopsize because the Cree tribe spans such a broad territory, from the Rocky Mountains all the way to the Atlantic Ocean. Though their common culture and language bind them together as a people, the James Bay Cree and Woodland Cree tribes do not necessarily have any more shared history than the white people in Quebec and Alberta do. With that caveat, though, the Cree Indians as a whole have weathered European colonization better than perhaps any other group of Native Americans. Their sheer numbers and broad range helped keep them from being too decimated by European diseases to maintain stability, as happened to many smaller nations, and their particular cultural affinity for intertribal marriage (remarked upon in the oral histories of their Indian neighbors) meshed well with the intent of the French, the primary Europeans to have dealings with them. Where the English tended to try to move Indian groups further away from their civilization, the French tried to engulf them. The Cree, who had held a similar attitude towards colonization before the French ever got there, engulfed back. The result was the Metis, a race of primarily French-Cree mixed-bloods, and distinct French and Cree populations who generally got along pretty well. Since Canadian nationhood, the Cree people have faced the same problems of self-determination and land control that every aboriginal group has, but they remain better-equipped to face them than most, and the Cree language is one of the few North American languages sure of surviving into the next century.
http://www.native-languages.org/cree.htm
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Old 12-18-2005, 12:06 PM   #8
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Post http://www.native-languages.org/lenape.htm

Language:: Lenap, also known as Unami or Delaware, is an Algonquian language once spoken in New Jersey and Delaware. Today there are no fluent speakers of Lenape Delaware, though many elders in Oklahoma still know some of the language. As with many dying Indian languages, there has been a resurgence in interest among some of the younger generation of Lenapes, and efforts to revive the language are underway. Two closely related languages are considered dialects of Lenape by some linguists and distinct Algonquian languages by others: Nanticoke or Southern Delaware, which was last spoken in the mid-1800's, and Munsee Delaware, which is still spoken by a few elders in Ontario.

People: The Lenni Lenape or Delaware Indians are often said to be extinct. This is not so; there are about 11,000 Lenape people in Oklahoma, where they were sent by the US government (which only recently stopped incorrectly classifying them as Cherokees), and another 5000 Lenape descendents in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, though they do not have federal recognition. The Munsee Delawares, in Ontario and Wisconsin, consider themselves a distinct tribe.

History: The oral traditions of other eastern Indians suggest that Lenape lands were the original birthplace of all the Algonquian tribes, and the Lenape tribe itself was referred to as "grandfather" by other Algonquian Indian nations on account of this. However, the "walum olum," claimed by some to be a pictographic history of the Lenape people, begins with the Lenape migrating south from Labrador. It is not known which version is correct, but anthropologists and tribal historians agree that by the time of European colonization, the Lenape Indians had been settled in the Delaware River area for centuries (the area that is now New Jersey, Delaware, eastern Pennsylvania and southeastern New York). Unfortunately the Lenape, like many Native Americans, were decimated by smallpox and other European diseases, and the survivors were driven increasingly further west by first British and then American expansion. Most Lenapes were eventually forced to relocate to Oklahoma in the 1860's, where they entered an uneasy union with the Cherokee Nation, regaining their own tribal status only in 1996. Other Lenape groups remained scattered along the westward routes or among other Indian groups that had given them shelter, where their descendents still live today.

http://www.native-languages.org/lenape.htm
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Old 12-18-2005, 12:13 PM   #9
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Post http://www.native-languages.org/blackfoot.htm

Language: Blackfoot, or Siksika, is an Algonquian language spoken by 8000 people in southern Alberta and northern Montana. The two main dialects are called Pikanii and Siksika Blackfoot. Many children are still learning Blackfoot, but the language is currently undergoing linguistic shift, with 'Old Blackfoot' being spoken by older generations and 'New Blackfoot' being spoken by younger ones.

People: The Blackfoot Nation really consists of four distinct Blackfoot nations, who share a historical and cultural background but have separate leadership: the Siksika (which means Blackfoot), the Akainawa (also called Kainai or Bloods), the Pikanii (variously spelled Piikani, Pikani, Pikuni, Piegan, or Peigan), and the Blackfeet Nation. The first three nations are in Alberta, Canada, and the fourth is in Montana. ("Blackfeet," though the official name of this tribe, is actually a misnomer given to them by white authorities; the word is not plural in the Blackfoot language, and some Blackfoot people in Montana resist this label.) The Blackfoot were nomadic plains hunters, traditional enemies of the Shoshone and Nez Perce. There are about 14,000 Blackfoot Indians today all told.

History: The Blackfoot were a powerful buffalo-hunting society of the northern plains. At first the arrival of the Europeans pleased them, since European horses became quickly invaluable to the Blackfoot tribes. Unfortunately, things took several turns for the worse. Smallpox epidemics ravaged the Blackfoot population in the mid-1800's (there is evidence that some white settlers may have deliberately helped it along by selling infected blankets). In 1870 American army forces, looking for Mountain Chief's band of hostile Blackfoot Indians, fell instead upon Heavy Runner's peaceable Piegan band and killed 200 of them, many of them women and children. (Mountain Chief and his people escaped across the new border into Canada.) Worse than any of this, by 1900, the white settlers had wiped out the buffalo herds. Hundreds of Blackfoot Indians starved to death, and the forced transition to sedentary life left a once-mighty nation dependent on government rations. Nevertheless, in the face of these travails the Blackfoot have not lost their culture, and the Blackfoot Indian language is one of the few indigenous languages in Canada and the United States which has a good chance for survival.
http://www.native-languages.org/blackfoot.htm
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Old 12-18-2005, 12:17 PM   #10
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Post http://www.native-languages.org/miami-illinois.htm

Language: Miami and Illinois are dialects of the same Algonquian language, spoken in Indiana and later Oklahoma. Though no native speakers of the language remain, language revival efforts are ongoing, and children from both the Miami and Peoria nations are learning to speak their ancestral language again.

People: The Miami Indians (Maumee or Myaamia, also called Twightwee or Twatwa by some of their neighbors) live in two groups, one of about 2000 Miami in Oklahoma and one of about 6000 in Indiana. The two groups consider themselves the same people, but only the Oklahoma tribe is recognized by the American government. Though the Illinois speak the same language the Miami do and the two are historical allies, they have always considered themselves politically distinct.

History: The Miami and Illinois Indians were very close relatives with nearly identical culture and language, but distinct political affiliation. Both nations were really loose confederations of several independent tribes, so perhaps there was some political rift which caused some tribes to group together as Miami and some as Illini. The Illini tribe was the more powerful of the two, until an Illinois man murdered the controversial but much-loved Chief Pontiac of the Ottawa Tribe; then almost every tribe of the central US except their kin the Miami turned on the Illini in a vengeful war that left only a few hundred survivors, mostly women and children. The Miami, meanwhile, were trying to fight off attempts by the young United States to drive them from their Ohio lands. With the alliance of the Shawnee and the generalship of the formidable Miami chief Little Turtle, they won two decisive victories against the Americans, but were eventually defeated. Some of the survivors were relocated to Oklahoma, while others remained in Indiana but were stripped of their treaty rights. The Indiana Miami remain unrecognized by the government (and dispossessed of their land) today.

http://www.native-languages.org/miami-illinois.htm
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Old 12-18-2005, 12:19 PM   #11
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Post http://www.native-languages.org/cheyenne.htm

Language: Cheyenne is an Algonquian Indian language spoken by about 1500 Native Americans in Montana and central Oklahoma. It is related to Arapaho but has a much more complex phonology, with vowel devoicing and tones. Some children are still learning Cheyenne as a native language, but due to the small number of speakers there is fear that the language may die out if effort is not put into revitalizing it.

People: Cheyenne Indians call themselves Tsitsistas; 'Cheyenne' is a mistake, a Sioux word for Cree. The Cheyenne were Great Plains people, who today have two tribes: the Northern Cheyenne in Montana, numbering 6500, and the Southern Cheyenne, who are united with their longtime allies the Arapaho into a single Nation in Oklahoma with a combined 11,000 members.

History: Many Native American tribes were victims of their small size, as smallpox and other European diseases left too few survivors to withstand colonization. The Cheyenne were victims of their own large size, for factions within their nation were poorly understood by the American settlers encroaching on their territories. For years relations between Cheyenne Indians and white Americans followed an ugly pattern of some settler killing a Cheyenne woman from one clan, that clan killing some settlers in revenge, and then angry soldiers killing some bewildered Cheyennes from a different clan--prompting their own kin to take revenge, and starting the cycle anew. This bloody cycle reached its worst point in the Sand Creek massacre of 1864, where one Colonel Chivington deliberately attacked a reservation of peaceable Cheyennes and Arapahoes under American protection and killed more than 150 Native American men, women, and children despite their repeated attempts to surrender. "Nits," he famously proclaimed, "breed lice." The most egregious massacre in American history--none of the participants even attempted to claim that the victims were armed or dangerous--Sand Creek was condemned as an atrocity even by the media of the time. Eventually the Cheyenne people were forced to move to Oklahoma. The Cheyennes from the south grudgingly accepted this arrangement, but the Cheyennes from the north could not adapt to the hot weather and "broke out" to flee back to the north, led by Chiefs Dull Knife and Little Wolf. Though many of the escapees were killed by the US Army en route, the rest reached safety and their descendents still live in Montana today. http://www.native-languages.org/cheyenne.htm
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Old 12-18-2005, 12:22 PM   #12
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Post http://www.native-languages.org/shawnee.htm

Language: Shawnee is an Algonquian language spoken by about 200 people in Oklahoma. It is most closely related to Mesquakie-Sauk and Kickapoo.

People: Originally from the Ohio-Pennsylvania area, the Shawnee were a migratory people, with villages scattered from Illinois to New York state and as far south as Georgia. They were rounded up and sent to Oklahoma by the US government in the nineteenth century, where 14,000 Shawnee still live today.

History: Kinfolk of the Lenape (whom they addressed as "grandfather"), the Shawnee migrated frequently, both willingly and under duress from Iroquois and colonial assailants. In the early 1800's, the Shawnee leader Tecumseh and his brother Tenskwatawa tried to unite the eastern tribes under the banner of pan-Indian unity. When this alliance was broken up by the Americans, the Shawnees were forcibly relocated to Oklahoma, despite the fact that few of them had been supporters of Tecumseh's. They still live there today, in three distinct communities.
http://www.native-languages.org/shawnee.htm
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Old 12-18-2005, 12:30 PM   #13
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Post http://www.native-languages.org/potawatomi.htm

Language: Potawatomi--more properly spelled Bode'wadmi, though it seldom is--is an Algonquian language spoken by fewer than 100 people in Ontario and the north-central United States. The current speakers are all older people and there is fear that the language may die out, though language revitalization efforts are ongoing.

People: The Potawatomi people hail from the Great Lakes region, though many were relocated to Kansas and Oklahoma during the Indian Removals. They are relatives and allies of the Ojibwe and Ottawa, and the name "Potawatomi" refers to their religious/political role as "fire keepers" in that alliance. Their name for themselves is "Nishnabek" (related to the Ojibwe word "Anishinabeg.") There are about 28,000 Potawatomi Indians today.

History: The Potawatomi, Ojibwe, and Ottawa belong to a traditional alliance known as the Council of Three Fires. This alliance is not as well-known as the Iroquois Confederacy, with whom they often clashed, but it was the Three Fires People who came out on top in the end. During the War of 1812, the Potawatomi tribe supported the Shawnee leaders Tecumseh and Prophet, who were fighting on the British side. The defeat of this pan-Indian alliance meant the relocation of many tribes, including the Potawatomi, who were moved to Iowa, Kansas, and Oklahoma--some peaceably by treaty, others on forced marches by gunpoint. Some groups of Potawatomi Indians remained in the Great Lakes region by fleeing into Canada, finding refuge with their Ojibwe allies, or negotiating with their white neighbors; others still live in Kansas or Oklahoma to this day.
http://www.native-languages.org/potawatomi.htm
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