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Old 03-29-2005, 02:49 PM   #1
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CD To Help Care For Adirondacks' Ray Fadden

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This message is reprinted under the Fair Use
Doctrine of International Copyright Law:
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FROM: THE SYRACUSE POST-STANDARD NEWSPAPER

http://www.syracuse.com/news/poststa.../1095326454212
973.xml

CD To Help Care For Adirondacks' Ray Fadden

Sunday, March 27, 2005

DICK CASE
NEIGHBORHOODS

Roy Hurd says his friend and teacher Ray Fadden "had a big effect on me."
That's why he wants to do something to try to pay him back.

That's why this Adirondack singer, composer and storyteller has a new CD out
called "Wolf Brother." It's dedicated to Ray, who will be 95 this summer and
lives at a long-term care facility in the Quebec portion of the Mohawk Indian
territory, north of the St. Lawrence River.

Now that the costs of the two-disc album have been covered, all of the
profits will go toward Ray's care, according to Roy, who lives in Redford, in
Clinton County.

Roy tells me this is the least he can do in tribute to a man who's become a
legend in the Adirondacks as a teacher and advocate of the Iroquois people.
Ray's wife, Christine, is Mohawk.

Ray taught for many years among his adopted brothers and sisters in the
Mohawk Nation, as well as in public schools. He was Roy Hurd's seventh-grade
science teacher at Saranac Central School.

The Mohawks adopted him because of his mission to correct lies he believes
our children hear about the original settlers of the Americas. His Mohawk name
is Tehanetorens.

In 1954, the Faddens - Ray and his son, John Kahiones Fadden - built the Six
Nations Museum on county Route 30 near Onchiota, about 14 miles north of
Saranac Lake village. Ray cut the logs himself.

The museum will open in June by appointment for its 51st season. It's rated
one of the first American museums devoted to Native American culture. Ray

and Christine lived across the road until Ray moved to Iakhihsohtha ("our
grandparents"), a senior home run by the Mohawks.

The Faddens are a family of artists. Ray drew the pictographs that decorate
his museum and some of the 27 pamphlets of Iroquois history and 40 charts he
published since the 1940s.

Son John is an artist with illustrations in more than 60 books to his credit.
He's retired from teaching art at Saranac Central. John's wife, Eva, is a c
arver and ceramist, and their sons, Donald and David, are artists too.

That's John's painting on the cover of the "Wolf Brother" CD.

John and his family run the museum since Ray's left Onchiota. Six Nations is
open every day but Monday during July and August.

"There's no way to replace him," John says of his dad.

Roy Hurd, a native of the Adirondacks, lives about 20 miles east of Onchiota.
"I've been playing music and writing songs forever," he says, adding that he
was out of the region 11 years writing and recording in Nashville.

The Faddens know him by his boyhood nickname, "Poncho."

Roy's new music CD is "Lady of the Lake." He returns to Nashville this week
to record a new one, which might contain the tribute song he just finished to
Ray Fadden. It's called "Memories of the Heart."

Roy tells me he had in mind to produce an album honoring Ray's "passion and
commitment to teaching the truth about Native American people." His resolve
kicked in after Ray was admitted to the nursing home.

The CD has 10 stories and songs presented by a gifted performer. Roy says he
learned some of the tales from Ray. Some are drawn from the "Walk on the
Mountain" program he gives to schools, which speaks to our moral commitments to the
Earth.

The stories include "Needles," "The Boy Who Lived With the Bears," "Chestnut
Soup, "The Little People" and "The Spirit Wind."

The album title, "Wolf Brother," refers to Ray's adoption in the Mohawk Wolf
Clan.

All his life, Ray cared dearly for the creatures of the Adirondacks, animals
and birds he felt had a disadvantage against creatures with two feet and guns.
He had a network of 200 feeding stations spread through the tall pines behind
his house.

"Ray's Restaurant" he named this mission, which cost him an average $1,000 a
winter on corn, sunflower seeds and other treats for his friends. "All the
animals in the Adirondacks," Ray would say with a mock sigh. "Thank God we don't
have elephants."

His special pals were the bears that came clawing on his back door for food.
He looked after them, wounded adult to orphaned cubs. One visitor had lost a
paw in a trap. Ray called him "Gimpy."

John Fadden tries to visit his father every week in Quebec. Ray's mind isn't
as sharp as it used to be, but during the last visit, John says, talk turned
to bears. Ray's face brightened; he understood.

Then he let loose with a familiar truth for him: "You have more to fear from
human beings than bears."

Dick Case writes Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday. Reach him at
470-2254, or by e-mail, citynews@syracuse.com.

2004 The Post-Standard. Used with permission.
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