Register Groups Members List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Forum Home - Go Back > General > Native Life > Native Issues Native groups warn of 'disaster' over rights act changes Native groups warn of 'disaster' over rights act changes

Reply LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-14-2006, 02:58 PM   #1
Honey Connoissuer
 
Blackbear's Avatar
 
User InfoThanks / Tagging InfoGifts / Achievements / AwardsvBActivity Stats
Blackbear has a reputation beyond repute
Blackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond repute
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Alaska
Posts: 9,817
Credits: 546.23
Savings: 1.00
Native groups warn of 'disaster' over rights act changes

************************************************** ******************
This Message Is Reprinted Under The FAIR USE
Doctrine Of International Copyright Law:
_http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html_
(http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html)
************************************************** ******************
FROM: _http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2006/12/13/prentice-bill.html_
(http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2006/...tice-bill.html)
Native groups warn of 'disaster' over rights act changes
Last Updated: Wednesday, December 13, 2006 | 5:49 PM ET
_CBC News_ (http://www.cbc.ca/news/credit.html)

Native groups slammed the federal government on Wednesday for not consulting
them on proposed changes to the Canadian Human Rights Act that would give
aboriginal people the right to challenge federal legislation governing First
Nations.
Aboriginal people in Canada currently cannot launch complaints about the
Indian Act under the Canadian Human Rights Act, because of a specific section in
the law that exempts the Indian Act.
At issue is Section 67, which says: "Nothing in this Act affects any
provision of the Indian Act or any provision made under or pursuant to that Act."
Federal Indian Affairs Minister Jim Prentice, who introduced the changes
Wednesday in Parliament, called the section "a block which prevents Canadian
First Nations citizens from having the same rights and protections that you and
I have."
Repealing the section "without engaging in meaningful consultations with
Aboriginal Peoples could only lead to disaster," said Bev Jacobs, president of
the Native Women's Association of Canada in a release Wednesday.
If passed, the change is expected to prompt a floodgate of hundreds of
discrimination claims.


Transition period ignored, groups say
Phil Fontaine, national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, said human
rights must be protected, but Prentice never responded to calls by aboriginal
groups for a crucial transition period recommended by the Canadian Human
Rights Commission.
"This is simply a recipe for ineffectiveness and will add new costs for First
Nations governments already under-resourced," said Fontaine Wednesday in a
release.
Prentice told reporters outside question period Wednesday that the government
has held "extensive discussions about this for an extensive period and
discussions will certainly carry on."
The groups said changing the act might seem like a good idea to non-natives,
but they have traditional laws that work and they consider them important as
well.
"Our people are fully capable of dealing with these matters themselves," said
Katherine Whitecloud, a regional chief of Manitoba.
__________________
Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.
Blackbear is offline   Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Old 12-14-2006, 02:59 PM   #2
Honey Connoissuer
 
Blackbear's Avatar
 
User InfoThanks / Tagging InfoGifts / Achievements / AwardsvBActivity Stats
Blackbear has a reputation beyond repute
Blackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond repute
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Alaska
Posts: 9,817
Credits: 546.23
Savings: 1.00
************************************************** ******************
This Message Is Reprinted Under The FAIR USE
Doctrine Of International Copyright Law:
_http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html_
(http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html)
************************************************** ******************

FROM:
_http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&pubid=968163964505&cid=1166050210845&col=968705899037&
call_page=TS_News&call_pageid=968332188492&call_pagepath=News/News_
(http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/Con...ticle_Type1&c=
Article&pubid=968163964505&cid=1166050210845&col=968705899037&call_page=TS_New
s&call_pageid=968332188492&call_pagepath=News/News)

Bill would allow native rights complaints

Dec. 13, 2006. 06:50 PM
SUE BAILEY
CANADIAN PRESS

OTTAWA A wave of native discrimination complaints is expected if a bill
introduced Wednesday by the Conservatives is passed.
Indian Affairs Minister Jim Prentice wants to repeal a 30-year-old section
of the Human Rights Act that has blocked complaints against Ottawa and band
councils acting under the archaic Indian Act.
"First Nations citizens don't have the same rights and remedies as other
Canadians," Prentice said. "We think that's unacceptable and we're prepared to
move on it."
National native leaders rejected the bill, however, saying they can't
support what they called a rushed and unilateral move that would sow dissent and
tension on reserves.
Already cash-strapped band councils could be peppered with claims.
Allegations of unfair treatment would likely range from housing disputes to fights
over how higher education funds are shared.
Ottawa is also expected to be targeted for various despised policies. Those
include Indian Act rules governing status.
For years, the Indian Act stripped thousands of native women of their Indian
status along with its rights and benefits when they married non-native men.
Remedial legislation, Bill C-31, restored status to those women in 1985. But
it did so with a catch: a new Indian Act section stipulated that their
children could only pass on Indian status if they married another status Indian.
Those who wed non-native spouses have been denied that ability an
exclusion decried by native groups as arbitrary and unjust.
The Native Women's Association of Canada and the Assembly of First Nations
issued a rare joint press release denouncing the bill.
Both groups stress that human rights must be protected, but they dispute the
extent to which Prentice sought the input of First Nations people.
"We are still dealing with the aftermath of Bill C-31, which was a result of
not having meaningful consultation with First Nations, including aboriginal
women," said Beverley Jacobs, president of the women's association.
Assembly national chief Phil Fontaine called the bill "a recipe for
ineffectiveness" that will add new costs for under-funded bands.
Jacobs said her group developed an 18-month transition plan to help First
Nations prepare for complaints and incorporate traditional, less adversarial
ways of resolving clashes.
"We didn't get a response at all from the government."
Prentice said discussions on the issues with both native groups were
"extensive."
If passed, the bill provides for a six-month grace period before it applies
to band councils to help First Nations get ready. The Canadian Human Rights
Commission is to work with native people and groups during that time.
Grand Chief Stan Beardy of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation, a political group
representing 49 First Nations across Ontario, hopes the bill may ultimately bring
relief to people living in the kind of squalor most Canadians can only
imagine.
His communities include Pikangikum, 250 kilometres north of Kenora, where
most homes have no running water.
"In many areas there are minimum standards of what is acceptable and what
isn't," Beardy said. "And it's only recently that my young people have started
to put pressure to make sure that those same rights are afforded to them.
"I think they'll demand that they have access to universal rights like
everybody else."
__________________
Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.
Blackbear is offline   Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Old 12-14-2006, 02:59 PM   #3
Honey Connoissuer
 
Blackbear's Avatar
 
User InfoThanks / Tagging InfoGifts / Achievements / AwardsvBActivity Stats
Blackbear has a reputation beyond repute
Blackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond reputeBlackbear has a reputation beyond repute
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Alaska
Posts: 9,817
Credits: 546.23
Savings: 1.00
************************************************** ******************
This Message Is Reprinted Under The FAIR USE
Doctrine Of International Copyright Law:
_http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html_
(http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html)
************************************************** ******************
FROM:
_http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=hamilton/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1166050213477&call_pageid=1020420665036
&col=1014656511815_
(http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NAS...77&call_pageid
=1020420665036&col=1014656511815)
Tories aim to give natives equal 'rights and remedies'
Hamilton Spectator wire services
OTTAWA (Dec 14, 2006)
A wave of native discrimination complaints is expected if a bill introduced
yesterday by the Conservatives is passed.
Indian Affairs Minister Jim Prentice wants to repeal a 30-year-old section
of the Human Rights Act that has blocked complaints against Ottawa and band
councils acting under the archaic Indian Act.
"First Nations citizens don't have the same rights and remedies as other
Canadians," Prentice said. "We think that's unacceptable and we're prepared to
move on it."
National native leaders rejected the bill, however, saying they can't
support what they called a rushed and unilateral move that would sow dissent and
tension on reserves.
Already cash-strapped band councils could be peppered with claims.
Allegations of unfair treatment would likely range from housing disputes to fights
over how higher education funds are shared.
Ottawa is also expected to be targeted for various despised policies. Those
include Indian Act rules governing status.
For years, the Indian Act stripped thousands of native women of their Indian
status along with its rights and benefits when they married non-native men.
Remedial legislation, Bill C-31, restored status to those women in 1985. But
it did so with a catch: a new Indian Act section stipulated that their
children could pass on Indian status only if they married another status Indian.
__________________
Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.
Blackbear is offline   Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Native American Station Programming Smokin' Ace Archives 18 10-05-2002 02:39 AM

    

Join the online community forum celebrating Native American Culture, Pow Wows, tribes, music, art, and history.

Join PowWows.com Today!

Your Guide to Native American Pow Wows Since 1996

Register For Free

Enjoy the benefits of being a member of PowWows.com!

Join our Native American online community focused on Pow Wow singing, dancing, crafts, Native American music, Native American videos, and more.

Add your Pow Wow to our Calendar

Share your photos and videos

Play games, enter contests, and much more!






New Threads

Pow Wow Calendar Search

 
Month: Year:

Location:
Facebook Profile Images

Videos

Featured Articles

Dance Styles

Crafts

Gallery