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Old 07-18-2006, 04:23 AM   #1
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Natives Reaffirm Right To Cross Border

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FROM: THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR NEWSPAPER
_http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=hamilton/La
yout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1153087816048&call_pageid=1020420665036&col=1
014656511815_
(http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NAS...l_pageid=10204
20665036&col=1014656511815)
Natives Reaffirm Right To Cross Border


Sheryl Nadler, the Hamilton Spectator
Thomas Salinas in full native regalia crosses the border at Niagara Falls.
More than 150 North American aboriginals made their annual crossing to mark
their border rights.

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(http://ads.thestar.com/click.ng/site...r&SubChannel=n
ews&position=bigbox&HChannel=news) By Paul Choi
The Hamilton Spectator
NIAGARA FALLS (Jul 17, 2006)
More than 150 natives from across North America paraded through the
Canada-U.S. border in Niagara Falls Saturday to commemorate a centuries-old treaty
that enables them to freely enter either country.
But for some participants of the noon-hour parade, the event also served as
a reminder of the land claim stalemate at Douglas Creek Estates in Caledonia
-- a 40-hectare subdivision Six Nations natives claim is theirs under treaty.
To these participants, the parade was symbolic of the struggle all natives
undergo to ensure age-old treaties aren't forgotten or superceded by modern
law.
"In Caledonia, they're reclaiming their territorial lands. Here we're
restoring our border crossing rights, so they are similar," said Ralph Summers, a
member of the Indian Defense League of America -- which organized the 79th
annual border crossing at the Rainbow Bridge.
"The rights we have crossing this border are the same rights the people in
Caledonia are entitled to as well. We're all brothers and sisters and we're
all fighting for the same thing -- our rights, our land."
Saturday's border crossing, which began on the Canadian side, came under a
sweltering sun, with natives from across the continent -- including some Aztec
aboriginals from Mexico --crossing the bridge over Niagara Falls in
traditional pheasant-feather headdresses and costumes.
Cars headed toward the U.S. side were reduced to a crawl as the army of
drummers, dancers and native flag wavers slowly walked their way to the border in
remembrance of the Jay Treaty, which was signed by the U.S. and Great
Britain in 1794 following the American Revolutionary War.
Within the declaration -- which was later replaced by the Treaty of Ghent
after the War of 1812 -- is an agreement that all aboriginal peoples have the
right to freely trade and travel between the U.S. and Canada.
This right was restated in the 1952 U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Act,
but natives on Saturday said they were marching -- and would continue to
march every year -- to ensure new post-9/11 security laws don't compromise their
freedoms.
"This is a march that brings awareness of Indians. If their rights are taken
away, who's next?" said parade marshal, Mike Fitzgerald, who added it was
the first time in his 30 years as marshal that custom officials asked
participants to present their native status cards for identification. "These people
here are just marching to keep those rights."
Despite the tight security, no major incidents or delays were reported.
For Janie Jamieson, Six Nations spokesperson for the occupation in
Caledonia, the parade is a family affair and an event that teaches young natives, and
mainstream Canadians, the importance of treaty rights -- both at the border
and in places like Caledonia.
Since February, natives and non-natives have clashed over a piece of land in
the town just south of Hamilton, with natives claiming the land is theirs
under the Haldimand Deed of 1784.
"The problem is mainstream society, Canada or the U.S., isn't made aware of
what our inherent rights are according to our own laws," said Jamieson.
"We as native people consistently educate our children, and ourselves, as
much as we can."
George Beaver, 75, a Brantford native who has attended the border crossing
since he was 10, said the situation in Caledonia is a direct result of
residents, government, and corporations -- who all want to build on the land --
ignoring long-standing treaties.
"It still goes back to the old treaties that were enforced at one time and
have never been superceded by other laws. People just try to forget these
treaties, especially those who might benefit."
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Old 07-18-2006, 04:24 AM   #2
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FROM: THE NIAGARA FALLS REVIEW NEWSPAPER

_http://www.niagarafallsreview.ca/webapp/sitepages/content.asp?contentID=10837
9&catname=Local+News_
(http://www.niagarafallsreview.ca/web...ame=Local+News)

Indian Border Crossing Protest Saturday

TONY RICCIUTO
Local News - Friday, July 14, 2006 @ 02:00

The Indian Defense League of America will be holding its 79th annual border
crossing Saturday at the Rainbow Bridge.

"We're hoping to have about 100 people come out and join us for this special
celebration," said Ralph Summers, a member of the co-ordinating committee
and master of ceremonies.

North American Native people will gather on the Canadian side of Niagara
Falls to form a parade and cross the Rainbow Bridge in restoration of the Jay
Treaty of 1794 rights and Article 9 of the Treaty of Ghent.


"We're working in co-operation with US Customs," said Summers, noting
regulations have tightened up in recent years relating to border crossings.

"We're encouraging our members and our people to co-operate by presenting
proper identification at the border because these regulations are coming from
Washington."

The parade will begin assembling at 10:30 a.m., in Queen Victoria Park, at
the foot of Clifton Hill. The assembled parade will then commence at 11:45
a.m., and make its way onto the bridge. A ceremony will be held at the
international boundary line at 12 noon.

The parade will end at the bronze statue of the late Tuscarora Chief Clinton
Rickard, who founded the IDLA in 1928. Special guest speaker will be Barbara
Graymont, editor of "The Fighting Tuscarora." Music will be provided by a
variety of talented First Nations/ Indian musicians.
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Old 07-18-2006, 04:24 AM   #3
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************************************************** ******************
This Message Is Reprinted Under The FAIR USE
Doctrine Of International Copyright Law:
_http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html_
(http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html)
************************************************** ******************
Hundreds of Natives Cross Border To Ensure Old Treaties Not Forgotten
PAUL CHOI
HAMILTON (Jul 17, 2006)
More than 150 natives from across North America paraded through the
Canada-U.S. border Saturday in Niagara Falls to commemorate a centuries-old treaty
that enables them to freely enter either country.
But for some participants of the noon-hour parade, the event also served as a
reminder of the land-claim stalemate at Douglas Creek Estates in Caledonia
-- a 40-hectare subdivision Six Nations natives claim is theirs under treaty.
To these participants, the parade was symbolic of the struggle all natives
undergo to ensure age-old treaties aren't forgotten or superceded by modern
law.
"In Caledonia, they're reclaiming their territorial lands. Here we're
restoring our border crossing rights, so they are similar,"said Ralph Summers, a
member of the Indian Defence League of America -- which organized the 79th
annual border crossing at Rainbow Bridge.
"The rights we have crossing this border are the same rights the people in
Caledonia are entitled to as well. We're all brothers and sisters and we're all
fighting for the same thing -- our rights, our land."
Saturday's border crossing, which began on the Canadian side, came under a
sweltering sun, with natives from across the continent -- including aboriginals
from Mexico -- crossing the bridge over Niagara Falls in traditional
pheasant-feather head dresses and costume.
Cars headed toward the U.S. side were reduced to a crawl as the army of
drummers, dancers and native flag wavers slowly walked their way to the border in
remembrance of the Jay Treaty, which was signed by the U.S. and Great Britain
in 1794 following the American Revolutionary War.
Within the declaration -- which was later replaced by the Treaty of Ghent
after the War of 1812 -- is an agreement that all aboriginal peoples have the
right to freely trade and travel between the U.S. and Canada.
This right was restated in the 1952 U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Act,
but natives on Saturday said they were marching -- and would continue to
march every year -- to ensure new post-9-11 security laws don't compromise their
freedoms.
Despite the tight security, no major incidents or delays were reported
Saturday.
For Janie Jamieson, Six Nations spokesperson for the reclamation site in
Caledonia, the parade is a family affair and an event that teaches young
natives, and mainstream Canadians, the importance of treaty rights.
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