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Old 04-25-2006, 08:31 PM   #21
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yout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1145829010154&call_pageid=1020420665036&col=1
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Mass Rally To Hear Caledonia's Anger





Sheryl Nadler, the Hamilton Spectator
Ontario's Aboriginal Affairs minister said he is 'working to bring down the
barricades as fast as possible.'



Kaz Novak, the Hamilton Spectator
Warrior Michael Laughing is among the native activists.



Sheryl Nadler, the Hamilton Spectator
A supporter of the natives tries to stay warm at the barricade.

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By Paul Legall and Paul Morse
The Hamilton Spectator
CALEDONIA (Apr 24, 2006)
Caledonia residents have been invited to a mass rally tonight to air their
anger and frustration over the occupation of Douglas Creek Estates, which goes
into its ninth week.
Tensions among rain-soaked native blockaders settled down yesterday after a
false report of another police raid sent occupiers scrambling for their
barricades just before dawn.
But some Caledonia residents worry tonight's rally may inflame townsfolk, who
feel caught in the middle.
"Of course there are people (upset) at the whole situation and that's going
to continue," said Mark Watson, who lives next to the occupied site.
Watson criticized Mayor Marie Trainer and councillors for not taking a lead
in helping to defuse tensions after last week's predawn raid by police, and
for refusing to attend the rally.
"Leaders are supposed to stand in front of their people, take a chance and
confront the issue, not back away from it."
Watson said residents in the neighbourhood next to the occupied site took it
upon themselves to de-escalate tensions after Thursday morning's raid, when
police arrested 16 people.
"We wanted to bring back a little civility to our own neighbourhood. I don't
care about the big picture right now."
He said residents approached natives and asked them to stop racing through
their neighbourhood on all-terrain vehicles. "The natives wanted to work with
us, they don't want to scare us," he said.
Haldimand County council met in emergency session behind closed doors
yesterday for an update on negotiations.
Trainer said she hoped "level heads and common sense prevail" at tonight's
rally.
She said Ontario Aboriginal Affairs Minister David Ramsey called her early
yesterday. "He said the province is working to bring down the barricades as
fast as possible on Highway 6 and Argyle Street, and that it was a priority for
everyone, including the protesters."
Negotiations between native leaders, provincial and federal governments and
the subdivision developer were put on hold yesterday after almost 24 hours of
talks over two days.
Ramsey said a deal to end the standoff isn't imminent, but he's optimistic
about reaching a negotiated resolution based on the progress so far.
Native spokesperson Hazel Hill said no talks were held yesterday because the
aboriginals' confederacy council was holding its own meetings.
But the developer on the contested piece of land says it is on the verge of
going bankrupt and needs a resolution soon.
In a press statement yesterday, Henco Industries pressed the provincial
government to provide "immediate interim funding" to keep the company solvent.
"We are extremely frustrated with the slow pace of negotiations," the firm
said in its statement. "We are particularly upset that no compensation has come
to us from the province ... We will very soon be bankrupt."
One suggestion repeatedly put forth by the Six Nations has been a government
buyout of Henco's development.
About 1,000 people are expected to attend the meeting, which will be held at
7 p.m. in front of the municipal office at 282 Argyle St., less than a
kilometre from the protest site.
Ken Hewitt, a local businessman and minor hockey coach, handed out leaflets
Saturday afternoon inviting concerned citizens to the function, which will be
the second public meeting dealing with the standoff.
"Come out and show your support for our community," the leaflet stated.
Why?
"To voice our anger, frustration and disappointment with our government and
its abandonment of our community, our safety, our businesses, our property
values and our rights as Canadian citizens," the document added.
Meanwhile, the Six Nations Confederacy chiefs believe they've achieved an
important step toward a peaceful resolution with the appointment of an
independent federal negotiator on the weekend.
Mohawk Chief Allen MacNaughton announced the breakthrough at a press
conference Saturday afternoon after 18 hours of negotiations with government
officials and the developer, Henco Industries, at a secret Burlington location.
He said the talks had been long and fruitful although there were still
significant issues to settle.
"We obtained an independent federal negotiator. It was necessary because the
people at the table didn't have the latitude to resolve the situation," he
told reporters as he stood in front of a barricade and makeshift shelter
blocking through traffic on Argyle Street.
The barricade is about 200 metres from the entrance of Douglas Creek Estates
and was erected Thursday after the OPP raided the site and arrested 16
occupants for contempt of court.
Native activists, including warriors from other nations, were able to drive
the heavily armed officers off the 40-acre survey and regain control of the
property, which has 10 homes in various stages of construction. Describing the
action as a land reclamation, natives say the land was originally deeded to
them by the British crown and is still part of Six Nations territory. Henco
Industries, however, claims it has a clear title to the tract.
Angered by the police action, the protesters also cut down power poles to
construct a barrier across the Highway 6 bypass, burned tires on public roads
and torched an old wooden bridge near the Six Nations reserve.
They allegedly looted a house in Douglas Creek Estates that Henco Industries
was using as a business office. In a press release last week, the Henning
brothers, who own the company, said they lost business records, office equipment
and other property.
Don Henning, who hasn't been allowed on the survey, told a Toronto newspaper
he learned about the looting when it was broadcast live on television. The
Spectator tried unsuccessfully to get a reaction from the protesters about
these allegations.
In its release yesterday, Henco said "our offices have been raided and its
contents removed, so we can only assume that all our corporate records have
been destroyed."
MacNaughton said the removal of the traffic barriers was among the issues
that are being discussed behind closed doors as well as "disengagement" from the
occupation site.
He told reporters he received assurances from the OPP and the RCMP, both have
officers in the area, they weren't planning to stage another raid.
MacNaughton said he's proud of the protesters for "keeping the peace" during
the "cooling down period" after the raid. He said there are always "a few
incidents" in situations such as this and is hopeful a peaceful resolution can
be achieved.
Before the press conference, he met with hundreds of protesters at the site
to report on the progress of the negotiations. Except for members of the
native media, reporters were not allowed past the barricade. But loud cheers and
honking horns could be heard as MacNaughton and other traditional chiefs
addressed the crowd.
Leroy Hill, a Cayuga sub-chief, said the protesters applauded their approval
when asked whether they still wanted the traditional chiefs to represent them
at the bargaining table. The Six Nations elected band council had passed a
motion earlier in the week granting the Confederacy chiefs the authority to
negotiate land claims.
Hill also called for a peaceful resolution.
"We are people of peace ... The law the creator gave us ... was to be
peaceful, supportive and respectful," he said.
[email protected]_ (mailto:[email protected]) 905-526-3385
[email protected]_ (mailto:[email protected]) 905-526-3434
with files from The Canadian Press
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Old 04-25-2006, 08:32 PM   #22
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FROM: THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR NEWSPAPER
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yout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1145829010142&call_pageid=1020420665036&col=1
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CKRZ-FM is Six Nations' CNN

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It has reserve's ear on the crisis
By Wade Hemsworth
The Hamilton Spectator
OHSWEKEN (Apr 24, 2006)
In these times of trouble at Six Nations, a small radio station is speaking
with a big voice.
CKRZ-FM, colloquially known as "Rez FM," has become a critical source of
live information for the residents of Six Nations and interested listeners
beyond.
It plays everywhere on the reserve -- in pickup trucks and tobacco huts,
restaurants and offices. The crisis over the occupation at Douglas Creek Estates
has made CKRZ the CNN of Six Nations.
Official communiques and breaking developments in the crisis are often heard
there first. Six Nations has a cable station and two weekly newspapers that
cover the community well, said CKRZ's Diane Keye, but the immediacy of radio
has given the station a special role in the current crisis.
"It's unfortunate that it takes an event like this, but it affirms that this
community needs this radio station and we need to be here," said Keye, who
is acting executive director.
At best, the community-based, non-profit station (100.3 on the dial) reaches
50 kilometres from Ohsweken with its 250-watt transmitter. But streaming
Internet audio (_www.ckrz.com)_ (http://www.ckrz.com/) takes it to listeners
well beyond southern Ontario.
From far and near, they have been listening especially intently since police
moved in on protesters occupying the construction site of a residential
subdivision at the south end of Caledonia.
Ever since Thursday morning when the OPP went in, the station has been
staffing the occupation site full-time and will continue to do so as long as the
situation remains tense.
Despite the protesters' on-again, off-again relationship with the non-native
media, CKRZ has kept communications open with all its sources.
It's no small task for a small outfit with just 10 staff and about 30
volunteers, but covering the crisis is critical to the station's mandate of
reflecting native life through music, information and education.
"We're professional. We're trying to get the information out," Keye said.
"If you want to get our perspective, tune us in."
Since Thursday, announcers and reporters have frequently been breaking into
regular programming with updates on the movements of police, announcements
from native politicians and other developments.
CKRZ operates from a bright storefront headquarters in the Iroquois Village
Centre.
The operation has the feel of a university radio station: informal but
earnest, not slick, but sincere. The station is on the air 24 hours, with 20 hours
of live broadcasting and recorded programming between 2 a.m. and 6 a.m.
Regular programming features traditional and modern native music mingled
with non-native music that ranges from bluegrass to rap, interspersed with
current affairs. Twice a day, at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., there are native language
lessons.
On Sunday evenings, the station earns its keep with radio bingo, where the
caller reads numbers in Cayuga, Mohawk and English and listeners play along
with tickets they buy at the station itself or stores on the reserve. Between
the bingo and some commercials, the station supports itself, after starting up
on federal grants.
CKRZ studiously avoids aligning itself with either the elected band council
or the confederacy of hereditary chiefs -- the two major political factions
on the reserve.
[email protected]_ (mailto:[email protected])
905-526-3254
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Old 04-25-2006, 08:33 PM   #23
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yout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1145829010042&call_pageid=1020420665036&col=1
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Deep Roots In Land Claims





Hamilton Spectator File Image
Joseph Brant -- Thayendanegea -- in about 1805, in a painting by William
Berczy. It was the loyalty of Brant and the Mohawks to the British in the
Revolutionary War that led to the Haldimand Proclamation.

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The origins of the native claims and protests in Caledonia are found as far
back as the American Revolutionary War.
By William Newbigging
The Hamilton Spectator
(Apr 24, 2006)
Like many First Nations issues, the problems at Douglas Creek in Caledonia
have deep roots. Before we can hope to understand what seems to be an
ill-conceived fiasco, it must first be necessary to examine the history of the Six
Nations people.
The best introduction to that history is The Valley of the Six Nations by
McMaster University historian Charles M. Johnston. Published as a part of the
Champlain Society's Ontario Series, The Valley of the Six Nations is a
carefully edited collection of documents relating to the history of the Six Nations
people from the time of their settling the Haldimand Tract in 1784 to the
surrender of the land to the authority of the Crown in 1841. The Valley of the
Six Nations has been a staple on reading lists for Canadian history courses
since it was first published in 1964.
It sheds light on the current problems and also on the issues that many of
us find so upsetting about First Nations land claims. In many ways the story
of the settlement of the Six Nations in the so-called Haldimand Tract along
the Grand River resonates with some of the critical themes of Canadian history:
settlement; the clash of cultures between the Europeans and the Aboriginal
People; the clashes between French and English; and worries over American
expansionism. At the heart of the story is one of our very own local heroes,
Joseph Brant -- or, his Mohawk name, Thayendanegea.
In 1701, after being worn down by the so-called "Mourning War" against the
Anishinaabe peoples of the Upper Great Lakes, delegates of the Five Nations
went to Montreal to forge the "Great Peace" with the Anishinaabek and their
allies the French. After the treaty, the Five Nations returned to their
ancestral homeland in the region to the south of Lake Ontario and to the east of the
Niagara River. In 1722 the five (Mohawk, Onandaga, Oneida, Seneca and Cayuga)
were joined by the Tuscaroras, the sixth nation in the confederacy.
When the Revolutionary War broke out in 1776 the Six Nations Iroquois first
chose to pursue a policy of neutrality. They made a treaty with the newly
formed Second Continental Congress to formalize this arrangement. The colonists
pledged to protect the Six Nations from encroachment on their lands in
exchange for this neutrality. Events soon made it evident that the Six Nations had
misjudged the Americans.
With its energies devoted to the epic struggle with the British, the
Continental Congress had no time to spare to see that the niceties of the Treaty
were respected. Thousands of Anglo-Americans soon began to occupy Iroquoia --
what we now call the Finger Lakes region. After being let down by the
Continental Congress the Six Nations turned to the British for help against the land
hungry colonists.
The leading figure in this drama was Joseph Brant. A longtime ally of the
British, Brant had been made "Interpreter for the Six Nations Language" by the
British agent to the Iroquois, Sir William Johnson. After Sir William's death
in 1774, Joseph Brant continued to work for the British and in particular
for Sir William's successor, Colonel Guy Johnson. In the autumn of 1775 Johnson
and Brant travelled to London on a mission of goodwill to the British
government. Brant used this extraordinary opportunity to express his concerns about
the intentions of the American settlers and land speculators to the
Secretary of State for the American Colonies, Lord George Germain. Brant warned that
the settlers wanted to cheat the Iroquois out of the small territory that
remained to them. Lord George listened sympathetically and promised Brant,
"every support England could render" as soon as the disputes with the Americans
were resolved.
This meeting convinced Brant that the interests of the Six Nations were best
served by allying with the British. Even while they were talking in London
the problem in Iroquoia was growing much worse and by the time of Brant's
return the situation was desperate.
When Brant arrived back in North America he went to see Six Nations leaders.
They were skeptical of an alliance with the British; Brant was still
relatively young and had little influence with his own people. In Iroquois culture,
age and tradition carried a huge amount of authority and Brant was young and
too closely associated with the British for some of his compatriots. His
claims that a British alliance was in the Six Nations' interest were met with
suspicion. Eventually however, the actions of the Americans became increasingly
hostile and the entire Six Nations force sided with the British.
The struggles of 1777 and 1778 were hard fought. Gradually the Americans'
superior numbers wore down the British and their allies. Brant and his men
fought with Major-General John Butler and won a number of battles but like the
rest of the British and allied forces the tide of the war turned against them.
By 1779 Butler and Brant had been forced as far west as the Genesee River by
the American forces under Major-General John Sullivan. Sullivan's forces
destroyed every Iroquois village they took. They burned the longhouses to the
ground and set fire to the cornfields. Iroquoia was destroyed forever.
Brant and his small force had little choice but to continue. They fought
hard along the Niagara frontier for the remainder of the war. By 1782, however,
the British commanders instructed their Iroquois allies to abandon the fight
as peace negotiations were announced.
For the natives' loyalty to the British Crown, and their courage on the
battlefield, the British government informed Brant that the Six Nations people
would be accommodated as soon as possible with a new home.
Such a home had a number of very specific requirements. First the climate
and soil had to be right for growing corn, beans, and squash, the "Three
Sisters" that formed the staple of the Iroquois diet. Second, Iroquois hunters
would need good access to deer, their main prey. Third, second growth forests -
forests which were not yet fully mature - were necessary to provide Six
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Old 04-25-2006, 08:34 PM   #24
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cont...

Nations builders with the raw materials they would need to build longhouses and
other structures and equipment. Finally, the Six Nations required an uninhabited
area, one that would not bring them into conflict with an established group.
The Grand River region, from its source to its mouth, fit the bill
perfectly. The soil and climate of the region were nearly identical to old Iroquoia.
The "Three Sisters" crops would thrive just as they had further east. Deer and
other game were abundant, all the more so because the region had not had
many human visitors since the end of the seventeenth century. Second growth
forests were plentiful and there was a lot choice for village sites close to
these forests.
The area had stood as a kind of no man's land for about a century. The
"Mourning War" between the Iroquois and the Anishinaabek had driven the ancestral
inhabitants (Eries and the oddly named Neutrals) out of the region. Far too
dangerous to settle, until the end of the century the land between the Niagara
and Lake Huron remained uninhabited. The land was purchased by the British
from the Mississaugas, an Anishinaabe nation from northern Lake Huron, but
they had a lacustrine fishing economy and wanted no part of the farmland of the
Grand River and had only claimed possession. In fact, the only problem with
the Grand River was its proximity to the frontier and to the American
colonists.
Accordingly, on the Oct. 25, 1784, the Governor of Quebec, Sir Frederick
Haldimand, made the so-called Haldimand Proclamation. Acting for the Crown,
Haldimand conveyed to the Mohawks "and such others of the Six Nations Indians as
wish to settle in that quarter" the Grand River Tract of land as restitution
for their losses in the Revolutionary War. Haldimand's grant was quite
specific and the Six Nations were authorized to settle along the banks, from its
head to its mouth "six miles deep from each side" of the Grand River.
In the early spring of 1785 Brant led a group of 1843 Six Nations people
from Lewiston, across the Niagara to their new home. The Cayugas (and a few of
their Delaware compatriots) built a village on the northeast side of the river
just upstream from Lake Erie. The Onandagas and Senecas built villages a
little further upstream and still on the northeast side of the river. Just along
from them the Tuscaroras built a village.
Closer to the present city of Brantford, the Mohawks, Oneidas, and another
group of Cayugas (called Upper Cayugas to distinguish them from the group near
Lake Erie) built their villages.
What appears to be a clear and unequivocal document, however, soon gave rise
to a set of controversies that are still raging today. There were two
problems with the Haldimand's proclamation from the outset. In the first place the
region was largely unknown at the time of the proclamation and not properly
surveyed. The Six Nations never went beyond the vicinity of present-day
Brantford and the region beyond was never clearly delineated.
Much more serious however, was the divergence in the interpretation of the
meaning of the grant. The agents of the British Crown asserted from Haldimand
forward that the land granted was not transferable and that Haldimand's
Proclamation did not recognize the political sovereignty of the Six Nations
Confederacy. Understandably, Joseph Brant interpreted matters differently. He
argued that the Proclamation was a de facto recognition of Iroquois sovereignty
and that the title to the land was, therefore, held in what the British law
called "an estate in fee simple." To prove this he quickly sold and leased huge
sections of the Grand River to British settlers.
These actions alarmed the Crown. In 1793 the lieutenant governor of the new
province of Upper Canada, John Graves Simcoe, drafted the "Simcoe Patent" a
document which stipulated that all land transactions in the Haldimand Tract
had to be approved by the Crown. Brant simply ignored Simcoe, and his "Patent"
and continued to invite British settlers into the Haldimand Tract. Somewhere
between Haldimand's grant and Simcoe's action, Brant and other Iroquois
leaders had changed their minds about the presence of British settlers. In the
early days they had been invited in as a means of demonstrating Iroquois
sovereignty but as time went by Brant came to realize the extent of the huge changes
that were sweeping across the region.
Brant seems to have realized that the days of the longhouse and the
traditional economy of the Iroquois were numbered. He felt the presence of British
farmers would serve as a good example for the Iroquois people and that the
Iroquois would learn to farm like the British. The Crown continued to oppose
Brant's actions and interpretations but Brant was by this time a wise and skilled
politician and the newly formed Indian administration was not equipped to
handle him.
In 1834 the first inquiry into the situation in the Haldimand Tract was
held. The Crown determined that Brant had acted illegally, but by this point it
would be too costly and difficult to move all of the British settlers from
their farms. The only option open to the Crown at this juncture was to confirm
the legality of Brant's leases. At the same time the inquiry raised a number
of concerns about the rapid growth of Brantford and the other communities
within the Haldimand Tract.
In response to the ongoing problems, the Superintendent of Indian Affairs,
Samuel Peter Jarvis, went to the Onandaga Council House in January 1841 and
suggested the Iroquois voluntarily surrender their lands (save some reserve
lands and the areas of the villages, a total of about 20,000 acres) back to the
Crown so that the Crown could administer the Haldimand Tract "for their
exclusive benefit and interest." Jarvis argued that one contiguous reserve would
allow for more economical construction of schools, churches, and other public
buildings. The chiefs agreed, but the agreement did little to alleviate the
confusion that resulted from Brant's interpretation of Haldimand's
Proclamation.
After Jarvis got the Six Nations to surrender their lands the ownership
question of most of the land that had been sold and leased was resolved, at least
in the eyes of the Crown. Various interests in the Six Nations continued to
maintain a different point of view.
Following the Order in Council of 1843 that affirmed the surrender, a
delegation of Iroquois chiefs appealed to the government to grant an additional
35,000 acres. This was granted and in 1847 the reserve was formally granted at
approximately 55,000 acres but subsequent surrenders reduced the size of the
reserve to 44,900 acres. The government also forced squatters off the reserve
land, but many of them simply returned.
The history that Charles Johnston recorded so faithfully in The Valley of
the Six Nations does help us to understand the issues that are now confronting
the developers and the members of the Six Nations protesting the development
at Douglas Creek. Understanding is one thing, however, and resolution is
another.
In this way Douglas Creek is no different than any other land claims case in
the country. The documents are readily available and the experts and lawyers
are ready and willing to take the matter to court. This, of course, is where
it must inevitably be resolved. It is unfortunate that the developers are
losing so much money. It is unfortunate that those hired to work on the project
are losing income. It is unfortunate too that friends and neighbours are
finding themselves arguing.
If there is a silver lining to this, however, it is that it has raised the
profile of the plight of First Nations peoples across Canada. It is to be
hoped that the issue has got the rest of us thinking about ways to find more fair
and permanent solutions to these problems.
William Newbigging lives in Hamilton. He is chair of the department of
history, and an associate professor of Anishinaabe-mowin (language and culture of
the Anishinaabek people) at Algoma University College in Sault Ste. Marie.
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Old 04-25-2006, 08:35 PM   #25
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FROM: THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR NEWSPAPER - LETTERS TO EDITOR
_http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=hamilton/La
yout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1145829010025&call_pageid=1020420665036&col=1
112876262536_
(http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NAS...l_pageid=10204
20665036&col=1112876262536)
Governments Passing The Buck

(http://ads.thestar.com/event.ng/Type...91,100,110,150
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By Michelle Hruschka, Hamilton
The Hamilton Spectator
(Apr 24, 2006)
Re: "'Everybody's watching;' Six Nations residents blame all levels of
government for not stepping forward and resolving land claims" (April 21)
I find it appalling and frightening that the governments, both provincial
and federal, can use the police to intimidate those who are trying to stand up
for their rights.
It just goes to show how sociopathic the system really is.
The politicians should be working with the native protesters in trying to
arrive at a peaceful solution.
They should not be passing the buck. The land initially belonged to the
natives, as they were here first, not white men.
The government has taken away so much from the native people in this
country.
The natives have a right to stand up and fight for what they believe in.
And there should be no interference from the police.
But then what can one really expect from a government that allows this type
of inhuman aggression for no reason at all, except that they are weak and
afraid.

================================================== ===========


FROM: THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR NEWSPAPER - LETTERS TO EDITOR
_http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=hamilton/La
yout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1145829010028&call_pageid=1020420665036&col=1
112876262536_
(http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NAS...l_pageid=10204
20665036&col=1112876262536)
Why don't we stand with the natives?

(http://ads.thestar.com/event.ng/Type...91,100,110,150
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By Sue Mcentee, Dundas
The Hamilton Spectator
(Apr 24, 2006)
Re: 'Angry clash; Natives, townspeople in a faceoff after police arrests
spark fires, anger' (April 21)
I cannot for the life of me understand why the people of Caledonia are not
standing alongside the natives in protest.
Have we not seen enough buildings and strip malls going up all over the
place? We do not have any green space left, not to mention the toll it takes on
what wildlife we have left.
As for the almighty white man with the money, whom we have justified to go
in and build as he pleases, it boils down to greed and profit, nothing more.
Throughout history the natives have been locked away and slaughtered when
they stood up for something. I am inclined to believe them when they say it is
native land.
I am ashamed to be of the white race. Wake up people -- regardless of the
shade of our skin, we need to stand against this government which has all our
money. And we all know money is power.
If this comes to a native uprising, my vote would go to the natives.

================================================== ===========


FROM: THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR NEWSPAPER - LETTERS TO EDITOR
_http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=hamilton/La
yout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1145829010022&call_pageid=1020420665036&col=1
112876262536_
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20665036&col=1112876262536)
Burtch property has escaped attention

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Old 04-25-2006, 08:35 PM   #26
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cont...

By Tom Gawrylash, Ancaster
The Hamilton Spectator
(Apr 24, 2006)
I understand why the protest is going on in Caledonia. But I also question
why the lands for sale at the former 540 acre Burtch Correctional Centre in
Brantford have not been protested in the last four years.
This property is within six miles of the Grand River and right next door to
the Six Nations Reserve at the end of the Indian Line.
It has buildings, a powerhouse, a mess hall, sportsfields, three airport
runways, a farm and a school.
Oh, I forgot -- there is nothing to disrupt that is being built on the
property yet.
I'd better find out which government is selling the property so I can get
ready to pay, through my already rising tax dollars, for the property damage
that will be done by protesters
================================================== ======
FROM: THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR NEWSPAPER - LETTERS TO EDITOR
_http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=hamilton/La
yout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1145829010016&call_pageid=1020420665036&col=1
112876262536_
(http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NAS...l_pageid=10204
20665036&col=1112876262536)
Bring back the Taliban?

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By Douglas L. Martin, Hamilton
The Hamilton Spectator
(Apr 24, 2006)
Re: 'Bring back clan mothers' (editorial, April 21)
How about bringing back the Taliban and Saddam and an absolute monarch as
well? Why fight for elections in Afghanistan? When the Six Nations clan mothers
run in an election, then I'll listen to them.



================================================== ========


FROM: THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR NEWSPAPER
_http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=hamilton/La
yout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1145829010019&call_pageid=1020420665036&col=1
112876262536_
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20665036&col=1112876262536)
Bring on the 'fearless leaders'

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By Jan Doll,Caledonia
The Hamilton Spectator
(Apr 24, 2006)
My father and his brother came over from Scotland with $2 in their pockets.
They came with a trade and started work the next day. My father, mother, two
brothers and myself have studied and worked every day since.
We have never been on assistance whatsoever and it's been hard. But we
established happy, healthy lives.
The Hennings, whose subdivision is in dispute, built my house. I did not
know this family until I moved here to Caledonia. I know the Hennings now
because they are huge contributors to our community.
They have built and donated land for baseball and soccer, they coach hockey,
volunteer at the schools and are major contributors to any organization in
need in the community.
They have always been honest, reliable, skilled, enthusiastic business men
and women, even 15 years after my initial dealings with them. I am appalled
that our fearless leaders in Ottawa have not visited the Douglas Creek Estates
site.
Access to Caledonia is easy through the Hamilton airport; it's a direct
flight and they could be home in time for dinner. I'll even pay for the flight.
Oh yeah, I already do.
Does Ottawa not realize this is a national issue? Is Ipperwash scaring the
sense out of justice? Whoever settles this issue will go down in history.

================================================== ==========
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Old 04-25-2006, 08:37 PM   #27
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MEDIA ADVISORY

Vancouver Native Community Supports Six Nations with a Solidarity Rally
RALLY ON TUESDAY APRIL 25TH 12:30 AT VANCOUVER ART GALLERY
(Coast Salish Territory/Vancouver, April 23rd, 2006)

Over 100 concerned members of the Vancouver Native community met at the
Vancouver Aboriginal Friendship Centre on Saturday, April 22nd , to show
solidarity with the Six Nations in Caledonia. Vice President of the United Native
Nations David Dennis from the Nuu Chah Nulth states, "As a collective, we
decided that in order to ensure the safety for the Six Nations women, children and
families, we will have a peaceful demonstration on Tuesday, April 25th, 2006
at 12:30 pm at the Vancouver Art Gallery. We will unite with our brothers
and sisters all across Turtle Island."

The Six Nations camp is unarmed and any police violence against the clan
mothers and youth is unacceptable. On April 20, 2006 at around 4:30 AM, the camp
was swarmed by 150 heavily armed police in cruisers and vans, using batons,
tear gas cannons, and tasers with 16 arrests. One woman was brutally beaten
by five OPP officers.

Organizer Annita McPhee from the Tahltan Nation further states, "We want to
send a clear message to the federal and provincial governments that they must
stop criminalizing our people who are standing up for our land and against
injustices that been brought upon by the colonizers. Canada must stop using
guns to resolve its disputes with the indigenous people ."

Simply because the Ontario and federal governments have committed to
negotiations, the threat of another police invasion is not over. The Six Nations
have stated that the blockades will only end when the people at the camp decide
for themselves whether enough progress has been made in ensuring an end to
the ongoing theft of Six Nations land.

This rally in Vancouver is intended to serve as a deterrence to prevent any
further police escalation against the Six Nations. We stand in support of the
demands of the clan mothers for an immediate cessation of construction by
Henco Industries on Six Nations territory which has never been surrendered and
was formally recognized by the Crown as part of the 1784 Haldimand Deed and
for peaceful resolution to the current standoff to be conducted on a
nation-to-nation basis.

Elders from the community encouraged everyone "to pray for the safety of the
Clan mothers, children, traditional teachers, and hereditary chiefs. This is
a time for all Nations to stand together."

MEDIA CONTACTS:
David Dennis, United Native Nations: Cell: (604) 868- 4283, Tel: (604)
688-1821
Annita McPhee, Cell: (778) 229-1264

- 30 -

-----------------------
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Old 04-25-2006, 08:39 PM   #28
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FROM: THE TRENTON TRENTONIAN NEWSPAPER

_http://www.trentonian.ca/webapp/sitepages/content.asp?contentid=28779&catname
=Local+News&classif=News+%2D+Local_
(http://www.trentonian.ca/webapp/site...f=News+-+Local)

Mohawks Remove Blockade

Leah Kellar -Special to the Trentonian
Local News - Monday, April 24, 2006 @ 10:00

MARYSVILLE A Mohawk blockade of Canadian National tracks has been
dismantled.

Late Friday, OPP spokesman Sgt. Kristin Rae confirmed a peaceful end to the
protest.

The Mohawks voluntarily removed barricades set up in solidarity with native
protesters in Caledonia. Rae said.

A Toronto court Friday ordered the natives to cease and desist. The national
railway sought the court injunction to free up the railway lines to allow CN
freight and VIA trains to roll along Canada’s busiest stretch of rail
traffic. Initially, about 100 natives blockaded a level rail crossing on Wyman’s
Road just west of Marysville golf course.

CN spokeswoman Julie Senecal told The Intelligencer that at least a dozen
trains were delayed from the protest.

The blockade wreaked havoc, creating major congestion in rail yards across
Ontario. Every day, up to 30 freight trains and a further 22 VIA Rail trains
traverse the Montreal-Windsor railway corridor.

Senecal said VIA passengers were bused to Toronto and Montreal. The action
was peaceful as a bonfire of railway ties spread black smoke near two parked
buses. A white car straddled the tracks.

A Mohawk warrior flag was tied to the end of an upturned railway crossing
gate while red and blue Iroquoian Confederacy flags rippled in an easterly wind
high above the scene of the protest.

A border collie named Lucky wandered near the barricade of old school buses.



Longtime activist and Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory resident Shawn Brant told
reporters later in the day that in spite of the court injunction the railway
blockade wouldn’t be lifted until progress was made at the much larger
Caledonia native protest where natives and police locked horns Thursday in a raid.

Brant said he and Tyendinaga Mohawk protesters were in a show of solidarity
with their Caledonia “brothers and sisters” who are embroiled in a native
land dispute.

“We learned our lessons in the past. You have to fight to garner respect,”
said Brant, attired in military fatigues late Friday. “That’s what history
has taught us.”

The peaceful demonstration went on through the day under the watchful eye of
about two dozen Ontario Provincial Police and CN Police about 500 metres
from the scene.

The uneasy truce began shortly in the early morning hours Friday when CN rail
’s safety system indicated there was a problem at the Wyman Road crossing:
the railway gates were malfunctioning. When CN officials investigated, they
discovered the blockade.

Almost 12 hours later, OPP dispatched a negotiating team into the centre of
the blockade to try and convince the protesters to end their action.

The negotiation had little impact through the day as close to 100 Mohawk
protesters, including as many as five children, settled in for what could be a
long wait.

OPP spokesperson Sgt. Kristine Rae confirmed negotiations had begun with the
protesters.

“We do have officers on scene and we know what their concerns are ... we
just want to make sure we can continue negotiations in a positive manner to help
bring this to a positive resolution,” she said.

Rae said police weren’t ruling out using force to remove the protesters. If
a decision is made to use force, Rae said it be made by senior OPP commanders
who were in a a temporary command centre a couple of kilometres to the east.

Brant, meanwhile, said in an interview with The Intelligencer early Friday
morning that local Mohawks would continue to block the tracks until the
government returns the tract of Caledonia land in dispute.

“How long we stay here will be determined by how things proceed in Caledonia,
” he explained. “Until the government shows a sign of good faith we will
remain here.”

The number of protesters dwindled down from 80 at midnight to 40 by mid
morning, when reporters were met by a hostile group of protesters who claimed
they wanted no media coverage.

“All we want is our land back,” said one woman. “They’ve been keeping us
on little chunks of land for years and now their taking that away from us.”

Brant said protests seem to be the only actions that governments recognize.

“With the police action yesterday (Thursday) by the OPP, there needed to be
an action of significance... we feel that Caledonia has to present itself as
a national issue and there needed to be a national response and national
solidarity of First Nations,” said Brant

“We thought that disrupting the flow of goods and people on the rail service
would be something that would draw the immediate attention of government and
would allow them to have that in the back of their minds when they go to the
negotiating table.”

Others who joined the protest were of equal resolve not to leave until they
had some assurances that the Caledonia issue would receive top urgency by
government officials.

Brandon Baptiste, 14, proudly wore the Mohawk warrior flag on the back of
his shirt at the scene. A military camouflage bandanna was tired around his
neck.

Baptiste said he would fight the police if they tried to enter the protest
armed with a court order to break up the blockade.

He might throw rocks, he said.

“Bring it on,” said Brandon. “You have to stand your ground. If you have
to, you must do it. I love being Mohawk and I wouldn’t trade it for all the
world.”

With files from The Intelligencer’s Derek Baldwin and Bruce Bell.
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Old 04-25-2006, 08:39 PM   #29
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FROM: THE CORNWALL STANDARD-FREEHOLDER NEWSPAPER

_http://www.standard-freeholder.com/webapp/sitepages/content.asp?contentid=285
27&catname=Front+Page&classif_
(http://www.standard-freeholder.com/w...t+Page&classif) =

Island Camp Maintained By Local Mohawks

By Kevin Lajoie
Front Page - Monday, April 24, 2006 @ 10:00

A group of local Mohawks remained camped out on Cornwall Island over the
weekend as a show of support for a native land dispute in southwestern Ontario.

A group of between eight and 15 Akwesasne residents set up a tent near the
Canada Customs building on the island and have maintained a continued presence
at the location since a protest on Friday.

The consensus appears to be that the group plans on remaining at the site
until the dispute over a tract of land in Caledonia is resolved.



“Chances are we could be here for a couple of days (yet),” said John Boots,
one of the protesters, on Sunday.

Rick Saaltink, general manager of the Seaway International Bridge
Corporation, said Sunday the presence of the protesters is not causing any traffic
delays on the bridge.

“We’re just monitoring things and concentrating on keeping the flow of
traffic going through there,” he said.

Saaltink said bridge officials are co-operating with police, who are
monitoring the situation.

Meanwhile, talks to end the dispute in Caledonia have gone on break after
two long sessions.

Aboriginal spokeswoman Hazel Hill said discussions to end the standoff in
Caledonia, near Hamilton, lasted about five hours until late Saturday night.

That was after negotiations on Friday started at 9 a.m. and wrapped up some
19 hours later.

Aboriginal leaders and the provincial and federal governments have agreed to
appoint representatives who will have the authority to negotiate a draft
agreement, which would then be subject to ratification.

Barricades remain at the occupied site but local residents who attend the
Caledonia Baptist Church which is just behind the blockade were allowed to pass
through for Sunday service.

A half-completed housing subdivision in Caledonia has been occupied for
nearly two months now by natives who claim it belongs to them through an
historical land deed.

With files from the Canadian Press
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Old 04-25-2006, 08:40 PM   #30
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FROM: THE GLOBE AND MAIL NEWSPAPER
_http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20060424.wxnativemain24/BN
Story/National/home_
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Six Nations Land Talks Buoy Ontario Minister
'Goodwill' created, province says, in bid to defuse dispute


KAREN HOWLETT
From Monday's Globe and Mail



Ontario cabinet minister David Ramsay says he is confident a dispute over a
tract of land adjoining the Six Nations reserve can be resolved peacefully in
the wake of marathon talks this weekend.
Mr. Ramsay, the Natural Resources Minister, who is also responsible for
aboriginal affairs, said that negotiators representing the Six Nations and the
federal and provincial governments are much closer to resolving the dispute than
they were a few days ago.
"We've managed to generate some goodwill on all sides," he said yesterday.
"We agree that we do want to settle this peacefully and we want to come to a
successful conclusion."

Negotiators met for a 19-hour session beginning on Friday morning and then
again on Saturday at a Burlington hotel under a news blackout. In a news
release after the meetings, negotiators said that they signed a draft agreement,
pledging to have each party appoint a representative within two weeks who will
come up with a road map on how to resolve the dispute.
Aboriginal members planned to meet last night in the hopes of ratifying the
agreement.
Mr. Ramsay conceded that he is making much more of an effort to keep abreast
of developments in the long-simmering dispute after last week's standoff
between native protesters and police.
"This is my No. 1 file," he said, adding that staff in his ministry are
working around-the-clock on the matter. Dozens of government officials in other
ministries and in the Premier's Office are also involved, he said.
However, he said, the Six Nations community has made it clear that the
primary party they want to deal with is the federal government. To that end, Mr.
Ramsay planned to meet with Indian Affairs Minister Jim Prentice this morning
in Ottawa.
Officials in Mr. Prentice's office have portrayed the conflict as a
provincial matter. But last Friday, the minister said that the federal government has
been monitoring the situation and sent in a fact-finder a month ago.
The land dispute became a top priority for Premier Dalton McGuinty's
government after the Ontario Provincial Police raided a construction site in
Caledonia, south of Hamilton, that had been occupied by native protesters since Feb.
28. The predawn raid last Thursday ended with more than 200 people from the
Six Nations Reserve regaining control of the land.
Don and John Henning, the brothers whose company is trying to build a
subdivision on the land, have sat back helplessly throughout the dispute.
In a statement yesterday, they said one of the options negotiators are
discussing is purchasing their land. "While we want to continue with our
subdivision project, we are willing to consider other options to end the standoff,"
they said.
The brothers sought a court order March 28 to remove the protesters.
Yesterday, they stressed that they cannot afford a long negotiating process. "We
strongly urge the province to provide us with immediate interim funding so that
we can honour our financial commitments and avoid bankruptcy," they said.
The McGuinty government is facing questions of leadership over its hands-off
approach in the land dispute, which has been simmering for more than a year,
and criticism that it has not learned anything from what happened at
Ipperwash Provincial Park a decade ago, when a police bullet killed native protester
Dudley George.
Toby Barrett, a Progressive Conservative MPP whose riding of
Haldimand-Norfolk-Brant includes the subdivision project, said the confrontation between
natives and the police can be blamed on the provincial government's failure to
take a more proactive role.
"There was obviously a vacuum of leadership," he said in an interview on
Friday. "One level of government was bouncing the ping-pong ball over to the
other side."
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Old 04-25-2006, 08:41 PM   #31
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FROM: THE GLOBE AND MAIL NEWSPAPER
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Iroquois Have Unique History On Their Side, Professor Says


RICHARD BLACKWELL

The unique history of the Six Nations reserve in Southwestern Ontario makes
the standoff at a housing development a land-claim dispute unlike most of the
others across the country.
What is not unusual is that this land-claim battle has generated bitter
feelings because of delays and miscommunication between band members and the
federal and provincial governments.
The British Crown gave the Six Nation property to Iroquois followers of Chief
Joseph Brant in 1783 as a reward for fighting on the side of the British
during the American Revolution.
The Iroquois had lost their land in New York State under the treaty the
British signed with the United States. As compensation, they were given a huge
tract in Southwestern Ontario -- a 12-mile-wide (almost 20-kilometre-wide) strip
along the banks of the Grand River that the Crown had bought from the
Mississauga Indian band.

Originally about 385,000 hectares, the property shrank over time through
government action and land sales, and currently is about 19,000 hectares. But
there have been many disputes over the lost land, including the site of the
current standoff, a piece of adjacent property that is being developed for
housing.
However, this battle does not fit the usual native land-claim model, said
Darlene Johnston, a University of Toronto law professor who specializes in First
Nations affairs.
In Atlantic Canada, British Columbia and the North, where few treaties were
in place, natives have filed so-called comprehensive land claims to get back
traditional territory that was never ceded to others, she said.
In Ontario and the Prairie provinces, most claims involve disputes over
breaches of treaties that had been negotiated to govern the use of traditional
lands. But the Six Nations dispute is over lands purchased by the government and
given to them by an act of the Crown.
"They have a very special claim to that land because they lost their other
[New York] land," Prof. Johnston said. "They relocated on the strength of
[Crown] promises."
The fight at the Caledonia building site stems from confusion over agreements
signed in the 1840s with the province. The band says its leaders intended
only to lease the lands adjacent to the "Hamilton-Port Dover plank road" -- now
Highway 6 -- but the government considered the arrangement a purchase, and
resold the property.
With houses now going up on it, militant members of the band felt they had to
take action.
But the fact that not all members of the band agree with the occupation
underlines another unusual feature of this dispute: that Six Nations essentially
has two governments. The traditional chiefs support the occupation, while the
elected band council does not.
Still, if all land-claim disputes across Canada -- including that of the Six
Nations -- have anything in common, it is in the frustration of dealing with
endless delays in negotiations and legal processes, Prof. Johnston said.
The Six Nations began filing dozens of land claims in the 1970s concerning
their disputed properties, including the "plank road" land. After almost 25
years of little progress, it decided to sue the federal government in 1995.
Those court battles are still outstanding.
"From the point of view of bands waiting decades for the resolution of
claims, Six Nations is symptomatic of the situation all across the country," Prof.
Johnson said. "In terms of frustration and lack of government attention,
it's typical."
The delays are widespread, said Bradford Morse, a law professor at the
University of Ottawa. "There are literally hundreds of unresolved land claims
across the country, awaiting validation by the federal government, or in
negotiations with the federal government, or not yet submitted to the federal
government, or [appealed] to the Indian claims commissions, or in court."
THE HALDIMAND PROCLAMATION
At the heart of the dispute is confusion over agreements signed in the
1840's. The band says it leased the land along what is now Highway 6 to the
province. The province considered the deal a purchase and resold the land.
LANDS GRANTED BY HALDIMAND PROCLAMATION (Oct. 25, 1784):
The lands at the heart of the Caledonia are part of the Haldimand Grant,
which originally cut across Ontario, six miles each side of the Grand River from
its headwaters to its mouth on Lake Erie.
SIX NATIONS RESERVE: 182 square kilometres, home to descendants of the League
of the Iroquois who came to Ontario.
NEW CREDIT RESERVE:
24 square kilometres, home to descendents of a nation that moved from the
Toronto area in 1824.
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Old 04-25-2006, 08:41 PM   #32
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FROM: THE GLOBE AND MAIL NEWSPAPER
_http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20060421.CALEDONIA21/TPStory
_
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STANDOFF AT CALEDONIA
'We Were Upholding Our Law'


KATE HARRIES
Special to The Globe and Mail, with files from Timothy Appleby

CALEDONIA, ONT. -- As a carnival atmosphere prevailed under a pall of smoke
at a construction site reclaimed by Six Nations activists yesterday, police
faced questions about a predawn raid that appears to have backfired
dramatically.
Basking in one of the first days of warm sunny weather, occupiers celebrated
having held their ground against the raid by heavily armed police.
"It was awesome, it was beautiful. We were upholding our law," said Hazel
Hill as she described how people from the nearby reserve marched against Ontario
Provincial Police officers, who withdrew within hours of a surprise 4:30
a.m. raid.
Deputy OPP Commissioner Maurice Pilon conceded yesterday that what began as a
peaceful occupation didn't look so peaceful after the police action. As to
why the OPP moved on the occupied site, police indicated that they believed
the risk to public safety had heightened.

"Over the last few days, we did see some escalation of activity that gave us
cause for concern," Deputy Commissioner Pilon said. He refused to elaborate.
OPP Sergeant Dave Rektor confirmed later that New York licence plates were
seen around the site.
Mohawk warriors from other reserves have been there since Feb. 28 when the
protest started. The occupiers have said they are there to protect women and
children.
A pall of smoke from several tire fires lit by the protesters in the
aftermath of the raid hung over this quiet community 20 kilometres south of
Hamilton, and Highway 6 remained barricaded to traffic all day. The protesters tipped
a van over a bridge and toppled some hydro poles onto a bypass around the
town.
Police were executing two injunctions obtained by Henco Industries, which
owns the property that the protesters say was stolen from Six Nations in 1841.
They arrested 16 people on the site, most of whom were released on their own
recognizance after being held in police wagons in Cayuga for several hours.
Some others were arrested off the site later, Sgt. Rektor said, refusing to
elaborate.
Lawyer Steve Reynolds said approximately seven people remain in custody at
the Simcoe Detention Centre and are to appear in Cayuga court today. They face
charges ranging from mischief to assaulting a police officer.
Three officers suffered minor injuries, with one needing stitches to the head
after being hit with what Deputy Commissioner Pilon described as a bag of
rocks.
Protesters say police used excessive force when they moved in around 4:30
a.m., citing injuries from pepper spray, kicks and punches.
Deputy Commissioner Pilon said the officers used "tremendous restraint."
Sgt. Rektor said that, initially, a minimum amount of force was needed, but
when the occupiers regrouped and became more confrontational, the least
necessary force was used and "we still treated them with restraint and respect."
Several people interviewed, all from Six Nations, described occupiers being
thrown to the ground, kicked and punched. "I see women getting hurt, I see
children getting hurt," said Eric Van Every.
Ken, who would not give his last name, had covered his face with a bandana
and displayed a bandaged hand because of what he said were chemical burns from
pepper spray deployed by an aboriginal officer after he resisted arrest.
Henry Hill said he was "tasered" four times in the back when he went to the
rescue of his stepmother, Ms. Hill, who was being held down by officers.
Shortly after, hundreds of people emerged from the neighbouring Six Nations
lands and pushed police back.
Police would not disclose how many officers were at the scene. Protesters
estimated their own numbers at from 200 to 400.
Police were armed with M16 rifles, tear gas, pepper spray and Taser guns, Mr.
Van Every said. Some protesters had clubs and axes, police said, though
according to Mr. Van Every most were unarmed.
"What we had was pretty much people's bodies. We were just singing."
"It was people power," said another protester. "Pretty much just numbers,"
Mr. Van Every said. "We were pretty much one-for-one with those cops."
Ms. Hill said the protesters offered the police a chance to move their
vehicles out. She said she was set upon when she went to deliver a message to a
group of officers that they should also leave.
A 19-year-old white supporter who would identify himself only as Will was one
of those arrested. He said he was asleep in his tent at the blockade site
when police arrived suddenly, with overwhelming force. "The whole street was
loaded with cop cars. We didn't get any warning from the people who were
standing guard."
He said police told them to get off the property. "I was walking off," he
said, when he was grabbed by an officer. "I told him to get his hands off me,
that was enough to get me arrested."
Will said he and around a dozen others were held for several hours in a
police wagon at the Cayuga detachment before being processed and released. He
said he signed an agreement not to return to the disputed property.
But he did. "It's not their right," he said of police. "They're in no
position to make that demand. Like, I was invited by the people who actually own
this land."
Among the mostly white Caledon residents, sympathies were mixed.
"What I'm nervous of now is the OPP going in with guns. The natives don't
make me nervous at all," said Kathy Maher, a thirtysomething woman who rents a
house on the edge of the disputed property and witnessed part of the
early-morning confrontation.
"It was all peaceful until this morning."
Her friend Jim Meyer concurred. "I don't understand why [authorities] are not
just showing them [the protesters] the bill of sale and saying, 'Here's
where the money went,' They've been asking for the records for years."
Others, less sympathetic, thought the police action was overdue. "If they
were going to go in and do this, they should have done it sooner," said a
Caledonia-area resident who did not want to be identified.
"Now [the protesters] have had a chance to get organized. I'm not against
native rights, but what about my right to go about my life, and drive down the
road without getting turned back at a roadblock?"
Deputy Commissioner Pilon confirmed that the raid came the morning after
talks between Six Nations representatives and federal and provincial government
officials. "There were talks going on last night and those did not lead to
resolution of the land issue," he said.
The Confederacy chiefs, who are the traditional government at Six Nations,
issued a release yesterday expressing disappointment at the police action. "We
believe we were within reach of a peaceful resolution." Another meeting is
set for today, the statement said.
Elected Chief Dave General, in a statement released by the Chiefs of Ontario,
asked that supporters from other native communities not travel to the
Caledonia site because the immediate priority is to defuse the situation and avoid
any physical confrontation between the protesters and OPP.
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Old 04-25-2006, 08:43 PM   #33
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FROM: THE MONTREAL GAZETTE NEWSPAPER
_http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/story.html?id=672ff0e6-c615-4b02-a
219-e0fd63ad0c7e_
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Six Nations Standoff Heating Up
Protesters, government agree to negotiate as town calls community meeting
tonight





(http://ad.ca.doubleclick.net/N3081/j...;ord=33641449?)





* _View Larger Image_ (javascript:void
window.open('/components/photo.aspx?url=http://a123.g.akamai.net/f/123/12465/1d/media.canada.com/idl/mtgz/2006
0424/236127-80177.jpg&credit=NATHAN+DENETTE,+CP', 'largephoto',
'width=500,height=500,location=no,menubar=yes,scro llbars=yes,resizable=yes'))
Six Nations protesters stand outside a barricade in Caledonia, Ont.,
yesterday, which was put up Thursday in response to a police raid.
Photograph by : NATHAN DENETTE, CP









KATIE ROOK, CanWest News Service



Published: Monday, April 24, 2006

Tension is continuing to fester at a subdivision project in southern Ontario
occupied for almost two months - and barricaded since Thursday - by Six
Nations members claiming the land as their own.
Around 4:30 a.m. yesterday, at least a dozen cars hurried towards a roadblock
in Caledonia, Ont., after the reserve's radio station announced an imminent
police raid.
At least three police checkpoints set up along the reserve's border were
confronted by protesters on all-terrain vehicles. Within the hour, Ontario
Provincial Police contacted CKRZ 100.3 FM to dispel the rumour and reassure
listeners there was no attack plan - rather, at least one officer planned to go to
Tim Hortons for a coffee.
On Thursday, 16 men were arrested in an surprise raid before sunrise.
Protesters have said they were beaten and Tasered by police.
The raid was to enforce a March 9 court injunction ordering the aboriginals
to leave the site, and was done out of concern for community safety, deputy
police commissioner Maurice Pilon said last week.
Six Nations members maintain the federal government wrongfully took the land
from them in the 18th century.
Over the weekend, agreement was reached by protesters, the provincial and
federal governments, and police to draft a plan that will provide a peaceful
resolution to the land claim dispute.
Each group will have the next two weeks to build their negotiating team.
Hundreds of Six Nations members have occupied the site, owned by Henco
Industries Ltd., day and night since the raid.
After the arrests, Caledonia, a bedroom community of Hamilton with a
population of about 12,000, appeared to be a town under siege. Black smoke billowed
from piles of burning tires and one car was thrown over a bridge, landing on
a pile of smouldering rubber.
In an apparent attempt to defuse potential hostility, an emergency town
council meeting was held yesterday.
Mayor Marie Trainer said the meeting was intended to give information to
councillors being inundated with phone calls from residents, and to prepare
contingency plans for emergency services as long as the blockade remains in
place.
She said the inconvenience and financial impact of the standoff had been felt
throughout Caledonia, but expressed hope that a community meeting planned
for tonight would not become a flashpoint for tensions.
"I would hope that people would use common sense and cool heads. After this
is all over, we're still going to be friends, neighbours and family."
Clyde Powless, a Six Nations spokesperson, said he saw the meeting as a
positive step that would unify Caledonia as the protest has mobilized his own
community, and he didn't expect it to ratchet up tensions between residents and
Six Nations members.
"I don't see no reason why it should. They're saying the same thing I'm
saying: 'Wake up, government.' We're carrying the message and they're just adding
to our voice, and I like it."
© The Gazette (Montreal) 2006
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Old 04-25-2006, 08:45 PM   #34
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Residents Test Truce In Caledonia Land Dispute

Canadian Press
CALEDONIA, Ont. — The fragile truce between natives occupying a southern
Ontario housing development and police who raided the site last week was being
tested Monday by angry residents who are demanding the protesters be removed.
Negotiations aimed at settling the dispute, along with assurances police were
not poised to march in and forcibly remove the occupiers, were cited as
proof of the effort to build "goodwill" between two groups with a history of
violent clashes.
But a scheduled protest by "frustrated" non-native residents was threatening
Monday to derail the uneasy peace between locals in this quiet community of
10,000 and the protesters, who have been on the disputed 40-hectare tract of
land for nearly two months.
"Tell your rabble-rousing constituents to calm down and step back," protester
Doreen Silversmith said in a pointed statement directed at Haldimand County
Mayor Marie Trainer.
The occupiers, for their part, vowed not to interfere with the rally.
"That's their community meeting," said native spokeswoman Janie Jamieson.
"They have a right to hold those without interference, and we plan on respecting
that."
The evening rally was to be held just 400 metres away from the native
barricades.
The seven-week standoff over the contested land, located some 30 kilometres
south of Hamilton, escalated from quiet protest to angry demonstration last
Thursday after provincial police raided the site and arrested a group of
protesters.
The mayor said the entire situation has left non-native residents
"frustrated" that their rights as landowners are taking a back seat to native rights.
"They are kind of being held ransom for all of Canada," Trainer said.
Still, Trainer urged residents Monday to "use common sense" during the rally
and said she hoped that "cool heads will prevail."
"They have to put pressure on their federal and provincial governments to get
this solved, as long as they don't spoil what's already happened -- the
goodwill that's been happening between all parties."
With marathon weekend negotiations between police, natives and provincial and
federal officials being described as positive, OPP deputy commissioner
Maurice Pilon delivered his assurances to the occupiers Monday that they're safe
from police action, at least for the moment.
"This was an opportunity... to reassure those who are inside that we have no
immediate plans to return," Pilon said after emerging from a 45-minute
meeting at the occupation site.
"I hope this was one small step in building trust."
Pilon's visit had indeed raised hopes among the occupiers, said protester
Clyde Powless.
"I hope it's a big step to regaining trust that has been lost," said Powless,
who urged federal Indian Affairs Minister Jim Prentice to visit the site as
well.
"Maybe that should be a step."
Posters for the rally billed the event as a chance "to voice our anger,
frustration and disappointment with our government and its abandonment of our
community." Opposition critics have also lambasted the governing Liberals for
its handling of the crisis.
In fact, negotiations between the Six Nations, Ottawa and the province had
been making steady progress for two years until a "faction" of the native
community lost patience and occupied the land, said David Ramsay, the minister
responsible for aboriginal affairs.
"When, literally, you've got Tasers and pepper spray being used, that doesn't
sound like progress to people," Hampton told the legislature.
"Why did you allow this situation to disintegrate to the point where the OPP
are using force once again against aboriginal people?"
The raid, which began in the early hours last Thursday, backfired when
hundreds more residents of the nearby Six Nations reserve raced to the scene and
used sheer numbers to push police back.
Native leaders and provincial and federal officials met for about five hours
Saturday night following a 19-hour marathon Friday in a bid to end the
seven-week standoff.
Henco Industries -- which is developing a subdivision known as Douglas Creek
Estates on the contested 40 hectares -- said Sunday that it is on the verge
of bankruptcy and needs a resolution soon.
The Six Nations claims the land was taken from them more than two centuries
ago. They say they agreed to lease the property for a road in 1835 and dispute
arguments that it was later sold to the Crown.
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Old 04-25-2006, 09:27 PM   #35
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No army, no national guard.. Thanks BB, I don't go near those fires anyways. I guess they we're wearing masks because they were expecting tear gas or some sort of thing like that. The Caledonia residents we're suposed to have a rally at the fairgrounds yesterday that ended up at the protest, yelling racial slurs, etc. The O.P.P. then arrested some Caledonia residents and they had formed a 'human chain' between the non-natives and the natives. Well, that's pretty much all for now. Ask me if you have questions I can find out for ya!
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