Register Groups Members List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Like Tree119Likes

Forum Home - Go Back > Off Topic > Chit Chat > Introductions Saying Hello Saying Hello

Reply LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-01-2014, 06:08 AM   #61
ᏎᎷ ᏓᏛᎯᏍᏗᏍᎪᎢ
 
Maize-Grower's Avatar
 
User InfoThanks / Tagging InfoGifts / Achievements / AwardsvBActivity Stats
Maize-Grower has a reputation beyond repute
Maize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond repute
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Rural Ohio, Appalachian Foothills
Posts: 117
Credits: 2,290.91
Savings: 0.00
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mogs View Post
Thatís another shocker, we are sold the line that the US is the most compassionate and caring society in the world.
Funniest thing I've heard all day. Thank you sir.

Quote:
We are given to believe that Native Americanís back then had no concept of individual land ownership, is this true or is it another load of simplistic rubbish? Group ownership must have existed, for there are many cases of Native American leaders asking/demanding settlers leave ďOur LandsĒ.
Kinda depends on the particular tribe. If I recall correctly, the Mixtec capital actually had a complex system of laws governing real estate and asset forfeiture. I personally prefer a world without that sort of mess though. Individually owned property tends to crop up where monarchies do, and seems to be a major component of their alleged right to rule, because they own the whole nation and you must pay them rent (property taxes) and do as they say in their land... When land is collectively owned, there is more equality among people because everybody gets a say and no single person can claim it all for themselves. Common ownership of land and resources was fairly common among Eastern Woodlands peoples... It shows a great degree of social refinement and progress.

"My reason teaches me that land cannot be sold. The Great Spirit gave it to his children to live upon. So long as they occupy and cultivate it, they have a right to the soil. Nothing can be sold but such things as can be carried away" ~Black Hawk, War Leader of the Sauk

"What is this you call property? It cannot be the earth, for the land is our mother, nourishing all her children, beasts, birds, fish and all men. The woods, the streams, everything on it belongs to everybody and is for the use of all. How can one man say it belongs only to him?" ~Ousamequin, Massasoit of the Wampanoag Confederacy

"The only way to stop this evil is for all the red men to unite in claiming an equal right in the land. That is how it was at first, and should be still, for the land never was divided, but was for the use of everyone. Any tribe could go to an empty land and make a home there. And if they left, another tribe could come there and make a home. No groups among us have a right to sell, even to one another, and surely not to outsiders who want all, and will not do with less. Sell a country! Why not sell the air, the clouds, and the Great Sea, as well as the earth? Did not the Great Good Spirit make them all for the use of his children?" ~Tecumseh, a Leader of the Shawnee

Presently, the Maya in Chiapas Mexico are re-starting this practice, much to the chagrin of the Government there.

Quote:
I've never seen a buffalo live, I guess we have some in zoo's, I've not come across one. It does seem silly to me (an outsider) that anyone would hunt anything big with bow and arrow, especially if that animal can then turn on you. The item I've seen was definitely modern Indians riding horseback, no saddles, some with rifles some with Bow & Arrow, there was no attempt to conceal it as a recreation.
I have eaten it on many occasions. In my book, it is my second favorite red meat after white tailed deer. It is often ranched these days and is about $8 per lb from the butcher where I live. My family's frybread is pretty different from OLChemist's, and is flaky like a pastry. In my house, this is topped generously with a bison meat patty or ladle of stew and consumed with total abandon. My stew is usually whatever squash or tubers are ripe in the garden, plus beans, meat, hominy (maize from the garden, processed in lye and then leeched), garlic, onions, hot peppers, and (in the autumn) pounded hickory nuts to add richness.

A bow and arrow has surprising power. The arrow goes slower than a bullet, but has more knock-down power and the damage is done with a blade instead of a lead bullet, so you can eat the wound-meat instead of it going to waste for fear of lead. I actually do take advantage of bow season, but I use a compound bow. I'd like a recurve, but they're pricey. I also have a blowgun, but I'm not sure it's legal to hunt with them, so I just shoot bug-eaten fruit with it. Most of my hunting is done with an old shotgun, though I've also got an SKS for hunting feral pigs and a Mosin Nagant for Bear. If I was hunting Bison, I'd use the Mosin Nagant. If it was the old days, I'd use an atl-atl and darts. (My tribe used these for large game according to archaeological digs in our homelands.)

Also, Monty Python is a riot.
__________________
Usgwanigidi anihnohehlvsgo yuniwonisa.
(They talk about interesting things.)
Maize-Grower is offline   Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Old 09-01-2014, 10:18 AM   #62
Tiny Tot Dancer
 
User InfoThanks / Tagging InfoGifts / Achievements / AwardsvBActivity Stats
Mogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond repute
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 45
Credits: 1,220.27
Savings: 0.00
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maize-Grower View Post
I have eaten it on many occasions. In my book, it is my second favorite red meat after white tailed deer. It is often ranched these days and is about $8 per lb from the butcher where I live.
After a little research it turns out that Buffalo are farmed over here, sadly the first one I found have had their herd destroyed (Scottish Bison). I found a Welsh one too (North Wales Buffalo), but I think their Buffalo, are in fact Water Buffalo. It is very much a specially product (expensive), perhaps on a special occasion we may buy some.

Hunting over here is highly regulated; it goes hand in hand with the UKís very strict gun laws. Iím not sure what you mean with the term blowgun. Iím assuming you mean Blowgun - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - very impressive. Iíve had a go at archery and I have a friend who does field archery, we Welsh are supposed to be good at that, beating the French at Agincourt, but itís probable not true.

Iíve never really thought about meat being spoiled around the bullet track, Iíve eaten wild rabbit killed by lead shot, we were warned that you may get the odd pellet.

K
Mogs is offline   Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Old 09-01-2014, 12:13 PM   #63
Pow Wow Committee
 
OLChemist's Avatar
 
Items ElephantPresent
User InfoThanks / Tagging InfoGifts / Achievements / AwardsvBActivity Stats
OLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond repute
OLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond repute
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 3,329
Credits: 70,447.46
Savings: 0.00
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maize-Grower View Post
...meat, hominy...
Pashofa! I'll be over for dinner.

Hominy is one of those foods that you either love or hate, I think. My mom went to college in the south and face the lake o' grits every morning. She hated them. So I never had any hominy products growing up.

Then when I was in college there were a bunch of us who'd commandeer the kitchenette in the Fine Arts Center lounge. We'd cook comfort foods. There was a girl from Ada, OK and she'd make Pashofa. It was soooooooo good.


My hominy lecture for the uninitiated: Matured (dried) corn does not contain much bio-available niacin and if used as a stable crop would result in pellegra and other nutritional diseases. So, Native peoples treated corn with base from ash and/or from slaked lime. This removed the hull, released niacin bound to various glycosides, destroyed fungal toxins, and cross linked some of the proteins in the kernels.

Corn processed this way when served with beans gave the complete compliment of amnio acids. It could be more easily milled and preserved. The crosslinking also enabled it to form a dough without the addition of flour.
windanncer likes this.
OLChemist is offline   Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Old 09-01-2014, 03:23 PM   #64
ᏎᎷ ᏓᏛᎯᏍᏗᏍᎪᎢ
 
Maize-Grower's Avatar
 
User InfoThanks / Tagging InfoGifts / Achievements / AwardsvBActivity Stats
Maize-Grower has a reputation beyond repute
Maize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond repute
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Rural Ohio, Appalachian Foothills
Posts: 117
Credits: 2,290.91
Savings: 0.00
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mogs View Post
Hunting over here is highly regulated; it goes hand in hand with the UKís very strict gun laws. Iím not sure what you mean with the term blowgun. Iím assuming you mean Blowgun - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - very impressive. Iíve had a go at archery and I have a friend who does field archery, we Welsh are supposed to be good at that, beating the French at Agincourt, but itís probable not true.

Iíve never really thought about meat being spoiled around the bullet track, Iíve eaten wild rabbit killed by lead shot, we were warned that you may get the odd pellet.

K
Never had water buffalo before. Looks good though...

Blowgun is made of cane with darts made of wood and fletched with the fluff from milkweed pods, cattails, or cottonwood fluff. Most of my darts are just sharpened, but some also have small knapped points. (I was bored over winter... took up stone carving and flint knapping. I'm not typical of most people.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by OLChemist View Post
Pashofa! I'll be over for dinner.

Hominy is one of those foods that you either love or hate, I think. My mom went to college in the south and face the lake o' grits every morning. She hated them. So I never had any hominy products growing up.

Then when I was in college there were a bunch of us who'd commandeer the kitchenette in the Fine Arts Center lounge. We'd cook comfort foods. There was a girl from Ada, OK and she'd make Pashofa. It was soooooooo good.


My hominy lecture for the uninitiated: Matured (dried) corn does not contain much bio-available niacin and if used as a stable crop would result in pellegra and other nutritional diseases. So, Native peoples treated corn with base from ash and/or from slaked lime. This removed the hull, released niacin bound to various glycosides, destroyed fungal toxins, and cross linked some of the proteins in the kernels.

Corn processed this way when served with beans gave the complete compliment of amnio acids. It could be more easily milled and preserved. The crosslinking also enabled it to form a dough without the addition of flour.
I grew up with hominy, love the stuff. Mine is blue... It wierds out my friends when I make grits, corn bread, or kanutsi (hominy and hickory nut soup). I keep my hominy in the freezer to maintain its pleasant chewy texture. I also have some regular corn meal for making johnny cakes and skillet pie.

Johnny Cake with butter:
OLChemist and windanncer like this.
__________________
Usgwanigidi anihnohehlvsgo yuniwonisa.
(They talk about interesting things.)
Maize-Grower is offline   Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Old 09-02-2014, 07:49 AM   #65
Pow Wow Committee
 
OLChemist's Avatar
 
Items ElephantPresent
User InfoThanks / Tagging InfoGifts / Achievements / AwardsvBActivity Stats
OLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond repute
OLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond reputeOLChemist has a reputation beyond repute
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 3,329
Credits: 70,447.46
Savings: 0.00
In the typical pattern of thread degradation on powwows.com, we are now obsessing over food, LOL.
windanncer and Maize-Grower like this.
OLChemist is offline   Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Old 09-02-2014, 11:23 PM   #66
ᏎᎷ ᏓᏛᎯᏍᏗᏍᎪᎢ
 
Maize-Grower's Avatar
 
User InfoThanks / Tagging InfoGifts / Achievements / AwardsvBActivity Stats
Maize-Grower has a reputation beyond repute
Maize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond reputeMaize-Grower has a reputation beyond repute
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Rural Ohio, Appalachian Foothills
Posts: 117
Credits: 2,290.91
Savings: 0.00
Quote:
Originally Posted by OLChemist View Post
In the typical pattern of thread degradation on powwows.com, we are now obsessing over food, LOL.
My great grandpa never seemed to regret eating anything he liked. Died (presumably happy) in January of 1999 of his 28th heart attack at the age of 78. He never did stop eating the sandwich his Mom used to make for him: Toasted fried spam and govt cheese on homemade white bread with mayo.
__________________
Usgwanigidi anihnohehlvsgo yuniwonisa.
(They talk about interesting things.)
Maize-Grower is offline   Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Old 09-15-2014, 09:46 AM   #67
Tiny Tot Dancer
 
User InfoThanks / Tagging InfoGifts / Achievements / AwardsvBActivity Stats
Mogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond reputeMogs has a reputation beyond repute
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 45
Credits: 1,220.27
Savings: 0.00
Last week our national TV S4C have started to repeat a series made in 2010 presented by Iolo Williams. The first of the series follows him as he visits the Blackfoot tribe in Browning Montana and also in Canada.

What was ironic was that the subject was presented through the medium of the Welsh language. Iolo converses with one guy (Pete Standing Alone from Alberta with his son Fagan) in welsh who in turn responds in his native language, I know that Iolo speaks english and I guess that Pete does also. So the picture comes to mind of Iolo asking the question in welsh (on camera to Pete) then off Ėcamera asking the same quest to Pete in english, Pete then responding in english, then again in his native language, a sure recipe for a comedy . Finally thereís me watching it having to read the english subtitles.

Pete was 82 in 2010, does anyone know him, he came across as a really nice bloke, I hope he is still with us?
Mogs is offline   Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

    

Join the online community forum celebrating Native American Culture, Pow Wows, tribes, music, art, and history.

Join PowWows.com Today!

Your Guide to Native American Pow Wows Since 1996

Register For Free

Enjoy the benefits of being a member of PowWows.com!

Join our Native American online community focused on Pow Wow singing, dancing, crafts, Native American music, Native American videos, and more.

Add your Pow Wow to our Calendar

Share your photos and videos

Play games, enter contests, and much more!






New Threads

Pow Wow Calendar Search

 
Month: Year:

Location:
Facebook Profile Images

Videos

Featured Articles

Dance Styles

Crafts

Gallery