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banglahopinese 10-07-2014 08:49 PM

Mixed race...where do I belong?
 
My mother (may she rest in peace) was half Japanese, half Bangladeshi. My father is Hopi. I need help figuring out where I fit in.

Being multiracial is difficult. In many ways I think it is harder than simply being a minority. I'm a mixture of minorities, so I look different from everyone else no matter where I go, and I don't feel like I truly belong anywhere. I am extremely envious of people who know their place in the world.

Because my mother died when I was young, I was raised in the Hopi culture of my father. I love my Hopi heritage and want nothing more than to carry it on. The problem is that I feel like I am unable to do this because of the way I look. I clearly have genes from Asia and India. The evidence is right here on my face, and it is undeniable. Thus I feel that Native people will automatically view me as a hobbyist or a poser, because I am obviously "something else."

This is an issue that causes me a lot of depression and anxiety. What can I do to honor my heritage without being immediately shunned and mistrusted by Native people because of the way I look?

banglahopinese 10-07-2014 11:36 PM

I feel this needs further clarification. I don't mean to imply that all Native people are unfairly suspicious of others, but this is something that has affected me a lot during my life. For example, at the most recent powwow I went to with my father, I was sitting on the sidelines watching him dance when I noticed an old Native woman glaring at me and shaking her head in disapproval. She whispered to some of the men seated beside her, who looked like elders, then gestured at me. The men looked over at me and narrowed their eyes. I wasn't even dancing or wearing Native regalia; I was just sitting there politely watching my father perform. I felt very embarrassed and turned away.

I wanted to go over and tell them that I had a legitimate reason to be there, that I wasn't just posing or hobbying or trying to steal someone else's traditions, that in fact I have a considerable amount of Hopi blood and was raised in Hopi culture. I also wanted to point out that although I look a bit more Asian than other Native people, all indigenous people of the Americas descended from Central Asia. But I was too shy. This is the type of situation I am referring to when I say, "What can I do to honor my heritage without being immediately shunned and mistrusted by Native people because of the way I look?"

cayenne13 10-08-2014 01:21 AM

a struggle...........
 
I totally understand where you are coming from! I am also part native plus irish & english...... growing up I was shunned a lot from both people on the reserve & the "white" people. I felt I did not fit in anywhere & its something very hard to deal with. People who are supposed to be of you own blood & race are supposed to protect & support you. It was some words from my doctor actually that helped me!we talked a lot about it & he said so you are not red, you are not white, you are pink & that means you are your own colour, your own special person, you are not made to fit in, rather stand out........ So be the best pink person you can be!!! So thats what I did...... But it really bothers me when I see other natives/whites/blacks etc putting each other down :( racism works both ways. So maybe you are here to be stand out & educate people on being labelled (or not being labelled) & what it is to be of mixed race......... I think a lot of people native & non-native need some educating in this subect. Find you peace within you! You have nothing to prove to anyone, be proud of your roots! :wink_smil

milehighsalute 10-08-2014 11:13 AM

i hear alot of stories of people being shunned......but never seen it..........i have a feeling most people feel shunned before even mixing it up with us and look for more reasons to feel that way.........maybe its because you are a stranger.....

the solution is stop being a stranger.....help an elder to thier car, ask anyone if they need help loading their truck, doing dishes, gathering firewood ect ect......make friends first then the acceptance will come

xTekno 10-08-2014 12:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by banglahopinese (Post 1609478)
I feel this needs further clarification. I don't mean to imply that all Native people are unfairly suspicious of others, but this is something that has affected me a lot during my life. For example, at the most recent powwow I went to with my father, I was sitting on the sidelines watching him dance when I noticed an old Native woman glaring at me and shaking her head in disapproval. She whispered to some of the men seated beside her, who looked like elders, then gestured at me. The men looked over at me and narrowed their eyes. I wasn't even dancing or wearing Native regalia; I was just sitting there politely watching my father perform. I felt very embarrassed and turned away.

I wanted to go over and tell them that I had a legitimate reason to be there, that I wasn't just posing or hobbying or trying to steal someone else's traditions, that in fact I have a considerable amount of Hopi blood and was raised in Hopi culture. I also wanted to point out that although I look a bit more Asian than other Native people, all indigenous people of the Americas descended from Central Asia. But I was too shy. This is the type of situation I am referring to when I say, "What can I do to honor my heritage without being immediately shunned and mistrusted by Native people because of the way I look?"

Since you have your father there, it might be a good time to have him introduce you to the people who you want to know more about you. Then as @milehighsalute suggested, do something helpful to gain their respect for you. Probably the next best thing is not to sulk away feeling rejected, but to become more active and participate somehow. You already stated that you have accepted the Hopi way of life. Carry on the ways and tradition.

milehighsalute 10-08-2014 12:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by banglahopinese (Post 1609478)
I feel this needs further clarification. I don't mean to imply that all Native people are unfairly suspicious of others, but this is something that has affected me a lot during my life. For example, at the most recent powwow I went to with my father, I was sitting on the sidelines watching him dance when I noticed an old Native woman glaring at me and shaking her head in disapproval. She whispered to some of the men seated beside her, who looked like elders, then gestured at me. The men looked over at me and narrowed their eyes. I wasn't even dancing or wearing Native regalia; I was just sitting there politely watching my father perform. I felt very embarrassed and turned away.

I wanted to go over and tell them that I had a legitimate reason to be there, that I wasn't just posing or hobbying or trying to steal someone else's traditions, that in fact I have a considerable amount of Hopi blood and was raised in Hopi culture. I also wanted to point out that although I look a bit more Asian than other Native people, all indigenous people of the Americas descended from Central Asia. But I was too shy. This is the type of situation I am referring to when I say, "What can I do to honor my heritage without being immediately shunned and mistrusted by Native people because of the way I look?"

if youre talking this kinda sheeit around indians then i could see why no one would want to talk to you

i know alot of hopis.....who were you raised around that co-sign this? where do they reside? ...............i really dont think a mix of ndn and indian would make you look THAT much different.

banglahopinese 10-08-2014 01:38 PM

@cayenne13

Cayenne, it was nice to hear from someone else who is mixed race. I appreciated reading about your experience, and I'm sorry you have often felt shunned by both white people and people on the rez. Maybe I need a change in perspective. I'll try to use my multiracial identity as an opportunity to "stand out & educate people on being labelled (or not being labelled) & what it is to be of mixed race," as you suggested.

banglahopinese 10-08-2014 01:40 PM

I would very much like to wear Native clothing with pride. I would like to dance at powwows. I feel like I have a right to honor my heritage without being rejected and viewed with suspicion.

@milehighsalute and @xTekno, I have always been shy, but I will try to come out of my shell a little bit more and interact with the Native communities. I hope they will accept me if I am kind and sincere.

The problem is, Hopi tribal enrollment requires 1/4 blood quantum, which my father meets but I do not. Will I be negatively viewed if I am carrying on Hopi traditions but am not an official member of the tribe?

banglahopinese 10-08-2014 01:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by milehighsalute (Post 1609522)
if youre talking this kinda sheeit around indians then i could see why no one would want to talk to you

i know alot of hopis.....who were you raised around that co-sign this? where do they reside? ...............i really dont think a mix of ndn and indian would make you look THAT much different.

Why is it "sheeit?"

If you read my post, you will see that I said I was too shy to say anything. So obviously, I am not talking about this around Indians or anyone else. It was something I thought because I felt embarrassed and awkward, and like I needed to justify myself. But I didn't voice it.

Also, it is my Japanese Asian heritage that makes me look "THAT much different," not my East Indian heritage. When people give me funny looks at tribal gatherings, I always assume it's because my Asian features make me stand out. Again, that's why I thought to myself that all Native Americans descended from Asia at some point, therefore having these features shouldn't set me apart so much. But as I said before, I kept quiet.

Joe's Dad 10-08-2014 04:11 PM

What makes you think ALL Indians descended from Asia? Did the Hopis teach you that?

Just asking.

milehighsalute 10-08-2014 04:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by banglahopinese (Post 1609526)
Why is it "sheeit?"

If you read my post, you will see that I said I was too shy to say anything. So obviously, I am not talking about this around Indians or anyone else. It was something I thought because I felt embarrassed and awkward, and like I needed to justify myself. But I didn't voice it.

Also, it is my Japanese Asian heritage that makes me look "THAT much different," not my East Indian heritage. When people give me funny looks at tribal gatherings, I always assume it's because my Asian features make me stand out. Again, that's why I thought to myself that all Native Americans descended from Asia at some point, therefore having these features shouldn't set me apart so much. But as I said before, I kept quiet.

i dunno about that.....i sometimes mistake my cousins from my pueblo side as asian all the time.....they have to remind me who they are

if your dad is known, and is considered hopi among his people then i dont see the problem.....just make it known who your dad is

QueenSnowGrl 10-08-2014 09:26 PM

Wow! I know exactly how you feel! I'm a mix of quite a lot, actually. Much of my heritage is minorities as well. People ask me what my heritage is, and they get bewildered because of how much is there! People like to stare and snicker at me, and even though I love my Native heritage and want to learn more about it, I'm afraid to.

I went to Disneyland not that long ago, and they had a store full of Native American themed trinkets, so I thought look around. The clerk (who was clearly Native) was looking at me really bewildered and somewhat mad, it made me uncomfortable. His assistant was also looking at me laughing. I felt uncomfortable and embarrassed. It's not the first time this has happened.

The best we can do is just embrace what we are, even if it's uncommon and learn as much as we can. Our background is a unique thing, and it shouldn't make us feel any less human. I think it's a great experience to share our knowledge on our ancestors and they way they lived that some people do not know about. I'm sorry you don't have many to relate to, but I do understand where you're coming from. Maybe there's some type of festival where you can meet new people of different heritages. Who knows, you might meet someone with a similar background to yours.

I'm Native American, European, and Middle Eastern. I've never met someone with a background like mine. I kind of find it fun to talk with others about their heritage. When I tell them what I am, they actually seem interested in what I have to say for once. :tongue:

xTekno 10-08-2014 09:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by QueenSnowGrl (Post 1609544)
Wow! I know exactly how you feel! I'm a mix of quite a lot, actually. Much of my heritage is minorities as well. People ask me what my heritage is, and they get bewildered because of how much is there! People like to stare and snicker at me, and even though I love my Native heritage and want to learn more about it, I'm afraid to.

I went to Disneyland not that long ago, and they had a store full of Native American themed trinkets, so I thought look around. The clerk (who was clearly Native) was looking at me really bewildered and somewhat mad, it made me uncomfortable. His assistant was also looking at me laughing. I felt uncomfortable and embarrassed. It's not the first time this has happened.

The best we can do is just embrace what we are, even if it's uncommon and learn as much as we can. Our background is a unique thing, and it shouldn't make us feel any less human. I think it's a great experience to share our knowledge on our ancestors and they way they lived that some people do not know about. I'm sorry you don't have many to relate to, but I do understand where you're coming from. Maybe there's some type of festival where you can meet new people of different heritages. Who knows, you might meet someone with a similar background to yours.

I'm Native American, European, and Middle Eastern. I've never met someone with a background like mine. I kind of find it fun to talk with others about their heritage. When I tell them what I am, they actually seem interested in what I have to say for once. :tongue:

was tonto in the store?

QueenSnowGrl 10-08-2014 09:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xTekno (Post 1609546)
was tonto in the store?

I'm laughing so hard, that's exactly how he acted! :lol:

banglahopinese 10-08-2014 11:10 PM

@Joe's Dad The Hopi did not teach me that all Indians are descended from Asia. That's what I have been taught in regular public school. Researching the subject leads me to the same conclusion. Is it mistaken? If so, please correct me. I don't want to be spreading or believing in false information.

When I thought to myself, ". . . although I look a bit more Asian than other Native people, all indigenous people of the Americas descended from Central Asia," it's because I was feeling awkward and embarrassed. It seemed like I was being unfairly judged based on my looks, and I wanted to defend myself. However, I agree that it would have been a rude thing to speak aloud. I would never have actually said it. I hope anyone I might have offended by posting this comment can forgive me.

@milehighsalute I'm obviously not going to post pictures of myself online, but to briefly describe my appearance: I have the fair skin and basic facial structure of Bollywood actress Katrina Kaif (from my Bangladeshi heritage), with almond eyes (from my Japanese heritage), a somewhat broader nose and high cheekbones (from my Hopi heritage). My hair is dark brown and my eyes are hazel. I feel as if I look totally mixed up, but maybe I'm just being too sensitive.

banglahopinese 10-08-2014 11:18 PM

Thanks a lot for sharing your experience @QueenSnowGrl. I feel your pain in many ways:

1. Being constantly asked what my ethnicity is (usually phrased, "What are you?" or "Where did you move here from?")
2. People staring, glaring, and snickering
3. Being reluctant to study my Native heritage for fear of seeming illegitimate

I don't mean to come across as overly sensitive, but feeling like you belong is a very important part of human experience, and it is something that I lack. But, taking the advice of people on this forum, I plan to make more of an effort to connect with others, and I will try to be forgiving of those who pass unfair judgment. Maybe someday I will come to view my multiracial identity as a special trait that makes me unique, rather than a burden.

banglahopinese 10-08-2014 11:33 PM

Talking about this subject makes me think of something I saw on Facebook the other day. Litefoot's youngest son Qwnuseia recently had a birthday. The child has light strawberry blonde hair and crystal blue eyes. He certainly does not look like what many would consider to be the traditional picture of an American Indian. I wonder if he will receive similar puzzled stares and scowls if he attends traditional events in the future. He looks like someone who, in a country like Sweden or Germany, would blend right in. Yet his parents are both American Indian, and some of Litefoot's lyrics in particular seem to have a less-than-favorable attitude towards white folks!

I guess the key is to be accepted by the community no matter what you look like. Lots of American Indians today have at least some caucasian or other admixture, so there can be a lot of variation in the way we look. I think I realize now that it's all about the way you act.

Hollywood-NDN -ES/LA 10-08-2014 11:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by QueenSnowGrl (Post 1609544)
Wow! I know exactly how you feel! I'm a mix of quite a lot, actually. Much of my heritage is minorities as well. People ask me what my heritage is, and they get bewildered because of how much is there! People like to stare and snicker at me, and even though I love my Native heritage and want to learn more about it, I'm afraid to.

I went to Disneyland not that long ago, and they had a store full of Native American themed trinkets, so I thought look around. The clerk (who was clearly Native) was looking at me really bewildered and somewhat mad, it made me uncomfortable. His assistant was also looking at me laughing. I felt uncomfortable and embarrassed. It's not the first time this has happened.

The best we can do is just embrace what we are, even if it's uncommon and learn as much as we can. Our background is a unique thing, and it shouldn't make us feel any less human. I think it's a great experience to share our knowledge on our ancestors and they way they lived that some people do not know about. I'm sorry you don't have many to relate to, but I do understand where you're coming from. Maybe there's some type of festival where you can meet new people of different heritages. Who knows, you might meet someone with a similar background to yours.

I'm Native American, European, and Middle Eastern. I've never met someone with a background like mine. I kind of find it fun to talk with others about their heritage. When I tell them what I am, they actually seem interested in what I have to say for once. :tongue:

Wouldn't a Disneyland native themed store mostly have a bunch of white customers instead of Indians?

And I'm of Native American, Mexican and white descent. I pretty much just look ambiguous, I've gotten every continent. Mostly I get Mexican but I'm usually in barrio environments anyway. If I'm at a pow wow it seems like people just assume I'm native, I think I've been getting that more with my longer hair. :p

wardancer 10-09-2014 11:23 AM

banglahopinese ; I think you worry too much about what other people think and not enough of how you think. You decide who you are and go from there. Others don't matter.

Joe's Dad 10-09-2014 11:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by banglahopinese (Post 1609554)
@Joe's Dad The Hopi did not teach me that all Indians are descended from Asia. That's what I have been taught in regular public school. Researching the subject leads me to the same conclusion. Is it mistaken? If so, please correct me. I don't want to be spreading or believing in false information.

When I thought to myself, ". . . although I look a bit more Asian than other Native people, all indigenous people of the Americas descended from Central Asia," it's because I was feeling awkward and embarrassed. It seemed like I was being unfairly judged based on my looks, and I wanted to defend myself. However, I agree that it would have been a rude thing to speak aloud. I would never have actually said it. I hope anyone I might have offended by posting this comment can forgive me.

@milehighsalute I'm obviously not going to post pictures of myself online, but to briefly describe my appearance: I have the fair skin and basic facial structure of Bollywood actress Katrina Kaif (from my Bangladeshi heritage), with almond eyes (from my Japanese heritage), a somewhat broader nose and high cheekbones (from my Hopi heritage). My hair is dark brown and my eyes are hazel. I feel as if I look totally mixed up, but maybe I'm just being too sensitive.

About being shy...SHY PEOPLE NEVER LEARN BECAUSE THEY ARE TOO SHY TO ASK QUESTIONS! lol

You can practice not being shy here. Just pretend you are at powwow and a group of grandmas and grandpas are asking you a bunch of questions.

Now, about the Asian connection...

You said your mom was Japanese. In school, I was taught Japanese and a bunch of other people for over there were Asian.

Now, if there is a THEORY that Indians are the the descendants of Asians, shouldn't, in the Japanese history telling, be something that says, "Your ancestors walked the 'Trail of the Bering Sea Land Bridge' and therefore, you are entitled to casino money"?

Did your mother, or her family ever tell you this story, or did you learn it in school, like most others who buy into the theory?

Just saying.

And I don't feel awkward or embarrassed on how I look. I'm old and wrinkled. My hair is down below my shoulder blades, It used to be black, but now it has a lot of gray. My eyes used to be brown, but now they have a gray ring around the pupil.

AND I DON'T GIVE A SH!T ABOUT WHAT PEOPLE THINK OF MY FEATURES! :hypocrite

I've seen Indians look white as rice and black as the ace of spades. Of course, they were mix bloods, but I knew their parents. and in some cases, I knew their parent's parents.

The difference is, the ones I know like this ^^ knew their family and CULTURE.

Those who spew around not fitting in, are the ones who have no ties to (insert ethnic group here) and use the excuse of being too, black, white, blue, green, blah, blah, blah to fit in anywhere.

Go look in the mirror...again...and describe what you see. Come back and tell us.

Same goes for anyone else who thinks they are not enough of...

QueenSnowGrl 10-09-2014 04:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hollywood-NDN -ES/LA (Post 1609557)
Wouldn't a Disneyland native themed store mostly have a bunch of white customers instead of Indians?

And I'm of Native American, Mexican and white descent. I pretty much just look ambiguous, I've gotten every continent. Mostly I get Mexican but I'm usually in barrio environments anyway. If I'm at a pow wow it seems like people just assume I'm native, I think I've been getting that more with my longer hair. :p

You see, that's what I figured. People at Disneyland come from all over the world, yet I stuck out for some reason. Maybe they shopkeepers thought I was a hipster looking for fake tribal patterns and dreamcatchers :boxedin:

I'm very white, but I have Native American and Jewish facial features. I live in California, so most people who live here are Mexican. I stick out sooooo bad. Strangers have come up to me and told me that. Most of my friends, when talking about our heritage, aren't surprised when I tell them what I am. I ask why and they just say, "I kind of figured." Haha...

I have two friends from Britain who like to make fun of how weird looking I am. A lot of people at my school who ask me what my background is, like to call me British and "cracker." My British friends laugh because they told me I look nothing like people in England, not to mention the fact I'm a lot darker than them. I have really pronounced features like high cheekbones and a pointed chin. English people tend to have softer, more subtle features. I'm just basing this off of what I'm told. I suppose it really doesn't matter though. :burnout:

QueenSnowGrl 10-09-2014 05:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by banglahopinese (Post 1609555)
Thanks a lot for sharing your experience @QueenSnowGrl. I feel your pain in many ways:

1. Being constantly asked what my ethnicity is (usually phrased, "What are you?" or "Where did you move here from?")
2. People staring, glaring, and snickering
3. Being reluctant to study my Native heritage for fear of seeming illegitimate

I don't mean to come across as overly sensitive, but feeling like you belong is a very important part of human experience, and it is something that I lack. But, taking the advice of people on this forum, I plan to make more of an effort to connect with others, and I will try to be forgiving of those who pass unfair judgment. Maybe someday I will come to view my multiracial identity as a special trait that makes me unique, rather than a burden.

:smile: You're a beautiful person. You shouldn't be ashamed of who you are because of other people who may try to make you feel otherwise. Personally, I think the description you gave yourself sounds really beautiful. I was looking at an article of a woman who is mixed with Native American and Japanese blood. She really gorgeous. She describes how she feels strange sometimes too. I think you would like it. I felt like I could relate to it a lot too. Icelandic, Japanese, Native American | Hapa Voice

Tsalagi_Phoenix 10-10-2014 03:19 AM

I'm mixed too. I'm Native, Welsh and German. But unlike other members of my family, I don't look Native. It's something I struggled with as a teenager. Then and even now, there are people who don't believe I'm Native. People have said some pretty nasty things to me and it used to hurt. But I realize now there will be people who won't accept me, they will never believe I'm Native and always think I'm just a wannabe.

But I've also learned to not care what people think or say. I know my heritages and I'm proud of who I am.

Be proud of who you are. Be proud of all of your heritages and there will be people who will accept you.

TeenaBear 10-10-2014 04:09 AM

Not to compare stories here, but try going to a pow wow knowing you're a direct descendant of a famous Spaniard Conquistador... :wink_smil:thumbs_up

On another note, the natives who are looking at you like, "who the heck is this thin blood?" are probably very naive. Being a genealogist, I have witnessed first hand that "blood quantum" via BIA is bs. Many who claim to be 1/4 do not really have that much "native blood" ... on the flip side, there are natives who are genuinely native who cannot register with the BIA due to lack of documentation and/or falsified documentation in the early 1900s to save themselves from enslavement. Point here is, unless they have done a vast amount of detailed research on their personal genealogy, which many Natives have not, they have no room to judge...

So, like someone else said: YOU know who you are. No one out there has the right to judge you are persecute you. If you feel comfortable being Hopi, then by all means, be Hopi. If you feel more comfortable being Japanese, then be Japanese. You can be whatever you want to be :)

Josiah 10-10-2014 01:24 PM

11 ways race isn?t real - Vox

xTekno 10-10-2014 02:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Josiah (Post 1609681)

in other words, when it's all said and done: you are what you are.

Fang 10-10-2014 03:11 PM

Why worry so much about what others think of you. If you know who you are, that's all that matters. Don't be "reluctant to study [your] heritage" or hinder your own personal growth for fear of what others might say. If you want to be proud of who you are and where you came from, you can't hide behind fear of being judged.

I know what it's like to be shy and self conscious, especially about being of mixed races. But it's no use letting the 'what ifs' or letting other people's opinions get to you.

That is Your family history; Your heritage(s); Your skin. You know who you are. Hold your head high and rock it!

Josiah 10-11-2014 11:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fang (Post 1609684)
Why worry so much about what others think of you. If you know who you are, that's all that matters. Don't be "reluctant to study [your] heritage" or hinder your own personal growth for fear of what others might say. If you want to be proud of who you are and where you came from, you can't hide behind fear of being judged.

I know what it's like to be shy and self conscious, especially about being of mixed races. But it's no use letting the 'what ifs' or letting other people's opinions get to you.

That is Your family history; Your heritage(s); Your skin. You know who you are. Hold your head high and rock it!

Funny how we do worry what people think about us when we are young. We want to be liked, or fit in or whatever... its human nature. Experience tells you that you can't please everybody... With experience comes age and when your an old fart you dont give two s**tz what people think of you!!!

I grew up in Shonto Az and was called white by my dine' classmates, not because I was white, I was brown as they were. Nope because I spoke english and they struggled with it. I knew what I was my parents and grandparents reenforced that but it still was hard.

If I had grew up without that reenforcement of what we were far from our home area would I still be who I am??. Your family defines your values, tradition, culture, language. If that is missing, then how can it be past down???

Its why I will always question these socalled start up tribes... that gap in knowledge sometimes more than 150 years has passed its difficult to believe it can be just picked up... my tribe struggles with words that were written down 100 years ago we know what it says but what did they mean when they wrote it down!!!

Such a simple question:
What are u?

Or as I like to ask: who are your people?

I so seldom hear: I am one tribe

Or I am Italian.

Usually I hear heinz57 lol (otoe/pawnee/sacnfox/iowa and on my papas side: kiowa/commanche and alittle bit mexican lol)

Ah now that is what we identify as, that is not what you were raised as... Nor what you look like... Brown is brown I could have sworn some guys I was meeting for the first time were native turns out they were from Turkmenistan and only spoke russian!! Ndns come in all shades from dark to very light... its how you were raised is what you are...

Joe's Dad 10-12-2014 06:43 PM

What is a thread without moosic???

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/yCj2I0EJ9PM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

QueenSnowGrl 10-13-2014 10:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joe's Dad (Post 1609766)
What is a thread without moosic???

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/yCj2I0EJ9PM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

I thought I'd add to this :lol:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Vj092UgKwQ

firechief201 10-13-2014 05:31 PM

Some links that may help!
 
Genetic history of indigenous peoples of the Americas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Native American DNA - Heritage and Legacy

Joe's Dad 10-13-2014 08:11 PM

Do you believe in God, or, do you believe you descended from an ape?

Just asking.

Joe's Dad 10-13-2014 08:20 PM

This is an excerpt from the 'Native American DNA - Heritage and Legacy' article you posted.

In addition, many Native Americans have the right to set up casinos on local tribe grounds, and may also be eligible to receive benefits from the government.

Do you have any idea how many white/black/other people salivate when they read this bullsh!t?

You've opened up a can up worms. Let's go fishing.

neling4 10-14-2014 08:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by banglahopinese (Post 1609478)
I feel this needs further clarification. I don't mean to imply that all Native people are unfairly suspicious of others, but this is something that has affected me a lot during my life. For example, at the most recent powwow I went to with my father, I was sitting on the sidelines watching him dance when I noticed an old Native woman glaring at me and shaking her head in disapproval. She whispered to some of the men seated beside her, who looked like elders, then gestured at me. The men looked over at me and narrowed their eyes. I wasn't even dancing or wearing Native regalia; I was just sitting there politely watching my father perform. I felt very embarrassed and turned away.

I wanted to go over and tell them that I had a legitimate reason to be there, that I wasn't just posing or hobbying or trying to steal someone else's traditions, that in fact I have a considerable amount of Hopi blood and was raised in Hopi culture. I also wanted to point out that although I look a bit more Asian than other Native people, all indigenous people of the Americas descended from Central Asia. But I was too shy. This is the type of situation I am referring to when I say, "What can I do to honor my heritage without being immediately shunned and mistrusted by Native people because of the way I look?"

Maybe you were sitting in her spot. Maybe she was looking at someone behind you.

I find it odd that anyone would be ticked off because you look Japanese at a powwow. You should have given her the "benefit of the doubt".

Grits & Beans 10-15-2014 04:40 AM

It reads like she was sitting in a section reserved for elders, but didn't know it...


Assumptions are lazy assessments. Taking a good look around you, then putting 2 and 2 together gets easier the more you do it. :regular_s

Maize-Grower 11-17-2014 02:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TeenaBear (Post 1609657)
Not to compare stories here, but try going to a pow wow knowing you're a direct descendant of a famous Spaniard Conquistador... :wink_smil:thumbs_up

On another note, the natives who are looking at you like, "who the heck is this thin blood?" are probably very naive. Being a genealogist, I have witnessed first hand that "blood quantum" via BIA is bs. Many who claim to be 1/4 do not really have that much "native blood" ... on the flip side, there are natives who are genuinely native who cannot register with the BIA due to lack of documentation and/or falsified documentation in the early 1900s to save themselves from enslavement. Point here is, unless they have done a vast amount of detailed research on their personal genealogy, which many Natives have not, they have no room to judge...

So, like someone else said: YOU know who you are. No one out there has the right to judge you are persecute you. If you feel comfortable being Hopi, then by all means, be Hopi. If you feel more comfortable being Japanese, then be Japanese. You can be whatever you want to be :)

That awkward moment when you do the white side of your family's genealogy research and find out they were the f#@$%^! pilgrims.

^This btw, is how I found out about Prince Phillip's War. Not in history books or school. I found out about it in our family record. The lengths people go to to cover stuff up are amazing.

Also, I get the 2nd 2 paragraphs absolutely. I can't count the times I was told by a county office that "The courthouse burned down, so we don't have the records you're looking for." It's a pain in the butt trying to legally prove your bq even after you know who your ancestors were. It's crazy. Currently, our research shows that I'm a minimum of 1/16, and up to 1/8. There are conflicting documents. My Dad's side is 100% European, and recently immigrated. But, he was not involved in my upbringing and his parents' cultures are not a factor in my image of myself. I have some of his features though.

Like several other people in this thread so far, I look very mixed. My immediate family ranges from very dark to very light-skinned. Our eye colors are blue, green, and brown. My younger siblings have such dark brown eyes, that they look like there is no iris, just huge pupils. Our hair is fine, and ranges from very dark brown to red. The other day when buying ribbons for applique, I got to talking about family to the clerk and showed her a picture of my family, she laughed when I said we were like confetti: colorful and all over the place.

We get stared at when on outings. That's not very fun. People used to ask if my older brother and I were adopted because we are lighter. He's got higher bq than me though, he's about 3/4 native (3 different tribes), but has the complexion of drywall.


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