PowWows.com Forums - Native American Culture

PowWows.com Forums - Native American Culture (http://forums.powwows.com/)
-   Ask PowWows.com (http://forums.powwows.com/f73/)
-   -   Traditional Dishes of the Cultures (http://forums.powwows.com/f73/traditional-dishes-cultures-72016/)

Deesk06 07-09-2020 10:13 AM

Traditional Dishes of the Cultures
 
Good morning,

I would like to start off by saying that I am vegan. I get a lot of hate for that in my culture. Not sure I can go a day without someone mentioning it somehow to me, lol. I am also not of any Native American Culture, at least that I know of. I am sorry if anyone here is offended by me being vegan(As I said, when I mention elsewhere I usually get hate and sometimes weird looks). I intend no harm or judgment by coming here and posting this, only seeking advice and new ways to learn about others cultures (and eat some good food, lol!!).

What dishes are some of the most traditional dishes to the many different cultures? Is there shared dishes among the Native American cultures or is it dependent upon each individual group? I can imagine that it will vary based on the different regions and seasons.

Anyway, I would love to make some dishes of the different Native American cultures. Anything that includes animal products I could easily sub for, so please do share either way!

I had intended to search this on google, but I am not satisfied with some of the results. I am unsure how true to the Native American cultures they are since they just seem to be websites for attaining clicks and views. I had thought there was no better idea than to ask those of the Native American culture instead of relying upon some person who only intends to make money from their "cooking" articles.

Thank you for your time and answers in advance! :shades_sm

wanjica_the_one 07-09-2020 06:29 PM

For the Dakota/Lakota/Nakota. We have puppy soup as a traditional dish. Would you like the recipe?

OLChemist 07-10-2020 12:57 AM

Welcome to powwows.com, Deesk06.

Be aware Indians love to tease and we love food. We also like to mix out pleasures and tease each other about the foods our various peoples like to eat. In keeping with that I'm going to start with a little friendly teasing. Coming from a buffalo eating people, we called vegans bad hunters :)

Native America has wonderful food. And the New Worlds foods we cultivated changed the planet: corn, chiles, squashes, beans, pumpkins, pecans, cranberries, blue berries, tomatoes, peanuts, avocados, potatoes, papaya, elderberries, cassava, sweet potatoes, vanilla, quinoa, pineapple, hickory nuts, nopales.... A lot of mainstream American cooking has Native roots, particularly in the south, southwest and northeast.

You need to go to one of the pueblos for a feast day! The food is incredible. Many of these dishes have crossed into the mainstream southwestern diet.

There are all kinds of stews. Most that I've had had meat. There are quelites, which are a potherb made with purslane or spinach and beans:

Bueno Foods: quelites

There are stews and sautés with squashes, corn, onions and beans. There is piki, which is a paper thin bread made with cornmeal and cooked on a hot greased stone (the grease may be an animal product). Many of the women at the pueblos are excellent bakers. They make many different kinds of breads, cookies and pies:

pastelitos

Some other greatest food hits of the pueblos:

Chiquos de horno

Pinon cookies


Then you need to stop in with the Navajo. Sadly, you'll miss my favorites mutton stew and mutton ribs with frybread. Get some tanaashgiizh (my apologies if I spelled that wrong), blue cornmeal mush, and sumac pudding. Have a glass of Navajo tea. Navajo Agricultural Products can hook you up with the ingredients.

Tanaashgiizh -- recipe 1

Tanaashgiizh -- recipe 2

Chiiłchin

There is kneeldown bread:

Kneeldown bread

There are all kinds of breads and cakes.

Check out the Youtube channel Navajo In the City and the websites by The Fancy Navajo and Chef Freddie Bitsoie.

The Fancy Navajo


Then head over to eastern OK. I was going to suggest a wild onion dinner, but eggs are out :(. Get some fried hominy, without the bacon. Try some bean bread, greens, grape dumplings and kunchi.

Kunchi

Greens and grape dumplings

Bean bread


Then head over and visit the Muscogee. Try some sour cornbread and blue dumplings.


Then you can head up north and home. Since you don't do meat, eating in buffalo country is a bit harder. But you have to try some wojapi, berry pudding made with blackberries, blueberries, chokecherries, or service berries:

Wojapi

Have some corn wasna, just don't eat it at night:

Corn wasna

Maybe you can find some strings of dried timpsila, prairie turnips (psoralea esculenta), or some wild plums.



Ok, it's midnight. I've run out of steam. And my cat knocked my glass of water on the running electric fan, which as you can imagine was not good for the fan. (Thank goodness it had an inline fuse.). Maybe tomorrow, we'll head east.

Oh, I forgot to mention that this part of the forum is moderated. Please be patient if your post doesn't appear immediately.

OLChemist 07-10-2020 09:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Deesk06 (Post 1643295)
What dishes are some of the most traditional dishes to the many different cultures? Is there shared dishes among the Native American cultures or is it dependent upon each individual group?

I took a second look at your initial post. I would like to make an observation about the above. Please be aware that there has been 500+ years of European exploitation and settlement in North America. Trade, disease, war and displacement has been altering Native foodways for a long time. Completely disentangling a pre-colonial diet, to arrive at an essentialist set of traditional dishes is likely many lifetimes of work. Just as it would be for the Old World; try to imagine Italian cuisine without tomatoes, the Africa diet without cassava, or the British Isles and Northern Europe without the potato.

There are folks trying to decolonize their diets. It is hard work.

Sean Sherman, the Sioux Chef

NYT: Sean Sherman 10 dishes

Amazon: The Sioux Chef's Indigenous Kitchen

The nearly universal dish of Native North America is a miracle of introduced ingredients -- frybread. There are as many recipes as there are Native grandmothers. You want to start an intertribal war ask if Navajo or Lakota fry bread is better, Blue Bird vs Gold Meal flour, lard vs Crisco, or hole no hole, LOL.

OLChemist 07-10-2020 10:58 AM

I'm at a bit of a loss for meat free Lakota dishes. Most of they ones I'm familiar with are made with fruits, wojapi, jelly, juice, syrup.... A lot of the other plant based dishes are pretty esoteric, the old folks ate them, knew where, how and when to harvest the ingredients and how to fix them. Habitat damage due settlement, flooding and herbicides and generational dislocation has resulted in a lot of loss. You have to look long and hard for some of these dishes. People are starting to recover them, but it slow work.


Now, you need to head down to NE. Find yourself a Omaha or Ho Chunk powwow, maybe you'll be lucky enough to find milkweed soup:

Edible Omaha --- milkweed soup


Then head east to the Great Lakes. Find yourself some wild rice, not the cultivated rice but the old school stuff parched over a wood fire. It has a special flavor that the farmed and commercially processed lacks.

Native Wild Rice Coalition

It makes lovely soups and salads with dried cranberries and the like.

Stop for tea. Have some bannock with wild berry jelly.

Recipes from the Native Women's Association of Canada

Minwanjigewin: Food and Tradition


Finally, head to New England. Here many Native dishes have moved into the mainstream American diet. What is Thanksgiving without turkey, pumpkin pie, succotash, cranberry jelly, a weekend on the beach without a clam bake and a lobster roll, a cookout without baked beans, poking around the bookstores of Cambridge without clam chowder and Boston brown bread, or breakfast without maple syrup?

Wampanoag Recipes



Ok, now for the disclaimer part. Many Native dishes require "foraging" for wild plants, berries, etc. This needs to be done with care, to protect the environment and your own health and safety.

First, you need an experienced guide. Plants are marvelous biochemists. They are experts at making biologically active molecules and not all these are beneficial.

Quite a few of these plants have toxic lookalikes -- Death camas can be mistaken by an inexperienced foragers for several edible species, as can toxic milkweed species for non-toxic. Further, certain parts of some edible plants have toxic parts or are toxic if eaten in the wrong season or processed the wrong way. For example, only the ripe fruit of the chokecherry is edible, but the seeds, leaves, shoot and other parts of the plant contain cyanogenic glycosides, or stinging nettles and pokeweed can be eaten but only after processing to reduce the levels of toxic compounds.

Second, many of these food sources are now threatened or endangered. These need to be left in place. And where they are more abundant traditional harvesting practices need to be observed to ensure the future of the resource and the culture.

wardancer 07-10-2020 11:15 AM

Wanji wasn't kidding ! :nono:

Deesk06 07-10-2020 12:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OLChemist (Post 1643306)
I took a second look at your initial post. I would like to make an observation about the above. Please be aware that there has been 500+ years of European exploitation and settlement in North America. Trade, disease, war and displacement has been altering Native foodways for a long time. Completely disentangling a pre-colonial diet, to arrive at an essentialist set of traditional dishes is likely many lifetimes of work. Just as it would be for the Old World; try to imagine Italian cuisine without tomatoes, the Africa diet without cassava, or the British Isles and Northern Europe without the potato.

There are folks trying to decolonize their diets. It is hard work.

Sean Sherman, the Sioux Chef

NYT: Sean Sherman 10 dishes

Amazon: The Sioux Chef's Indigenous Kitchen

The nearly universal dish of Native North America is a miracle of introduced ingredients -- frybread. There are as many recipes as there are Native grandmothers. You want to start an intertribal war ask if Navajo or Lakota fry bread is better, Blue Bird vs Gold Meal flour, lard vs Crisco, or hole no hole, LOL.

I imagine it has been that way for awhile, people are too fixated on themselves without taking others into consideration. Its all about "them" and they(European cultures) had horrible practices to get to where they wanted to be. I do not want to get into it because it is upsetting and I hate to even bring it up here as I am sure it is unsettling for many others as well. Just knowing that it has happened and it continues to happen upsets me.

Now, I did not mean to go ALL the way back to have the dish be spot on as it was hundreds of years ago, lol, that sounds like an extremely daunting task! However I am sure you have made plenty of dishes that you consider dear to you and your culture. As I am also sure many other Native American cultures do as well.

Sooo.....what is better? Navajo or Lakota fry bread? LOL

Deesk06 07-10-2020 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OLChemist (Post 1643307)
I'm at a bit of a loss for meat free Lakota dishes. Most of they ones I'm familiar with are made with fruits, wojapi, jelly, juice, syrup.... A lot of the other plant based dishes are pretty esoteric, the old folks ate them, knew where, how and when to harvest the ingredients and how to fix them. Habitat damage due settlement, flooding and herbicides and generational dislocation has resulted in a lot of loss. You have to look long and hard for some of these dishes. People are starting to recover them, but it slow work.


Now, you need to head down to NE. Find yourself a Omaha or Ho Chunk powwow, made you'll be lucky enough to find milkweed soup:

Edible Omaha --- milkweed soup


Then head east to the Great Lakes. Find yourself some wild rice, not the cultivated rice but the old school stuff parched over a wood fire. It has a special flavor that the farmed and commercially processed lacks.

Native Wild Rice Coalition

It makes lovely soups and salads with dried cranberries and the like.

Stop for tea. Have some bannock with wild berry jelly.

Recipes from the Native Women's Association of Canada

Minwanjigewin: Food and Tradition


Finally, head to New England. Here many Native dishes have moved into the mainstream American diet. What is Thanksgiving without turkey, pumpkin pie, succotash, cranberry jelly, a weekend on the beach without a clam bake and a lobster roll, a cookout without baked beans, poking around the bookstores of Cambridge without clam chowder and Boston brown bread, or breakfast without maple syrup?

Wampanoag Recipes



Ok, now for the disclaimer part. Many Native dishes require "foraging" for wild plants, berries, etc. This needs to be done with care, to protect the environment and your own health and safety.

First, you need an experienced guide. Plants are marvelous biochemists. They are experts at making biologically active molecules and not all these are beneficial.

Quite a few of these plants have toxic lookalikes -- Death camas can be mistaken by an inexperienced foragers for several edible species, as can toxic milkweed species be for non-toxic. Further, certain parts of some edible plants have toxic parts or are toxic if eaten in the wrong season or processed the wrong way. For example, only the ripe fruit of the chokecherry is edible, but the seeds, leaves, shoot and other parts of the plant contain cyanogenic glycosides, or stinging nettles and pokeweed can be eaten but only after processing to reduce the levels of toxic compounds.

Second, many of these food sources are now threatened or endangered. These need to be left in place. And where they are more abundant traditional harvesting practices need to be observed to ensure the future of the resource and the culture.

Please, do not worry if you are having difficulty! It is not an issue at all! As I said, I can substitute plenty of ingredients for something similar. I understand it may not be exactly the same, but close is good enough for me! I love those websites you had linked as well! I love rice and I would love to try the non-bland, non-processed wild rice you are speaking of!It seems for now I am stuck to the grocery stores, however, I have gone out and occasionally harvested some fruits and veggies from the land, but not often. I also do treat them with care, they are my primary food source so I am extremely grateful for the plants!Too often do I see people throw trash or beat up the land. The most recent wildfires in Arizona were also disheartening. I wish some people could spend the few extra seconds it takes to put the trash in your pocket instead of on the ground.

Broken Arrow 07-10-2020 12:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wanjica_the_one (Post 1643302)
For the Dakota/Lakota/Nakota. We have puppy soup as a traditional dish. Would you like the recipe?

Yes.






Since 1986 by law forbidden in Germany, more precisely, it is forbidden to slaughter puppies or sell the meat.

OLChemist 07-10-2020 01:25 PM

WD and Wanjica, make sure you take off the flea collar first. Makes the soup taste funny. ��

Quote:

Originally Posted by wardancer (Post 1643309)
Wanji wasn't kidding ! :nono:


My mom has these yippee little teacup poodles. Three to four pound mops of brown curly hair, with severe attitude problems. My uncle calls them cup o' soup, LOL.

OLChemist 07-10-2020 02:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Deesk06 (Post 1643311)
Sooo.....what is better? Navajo or Lakota fry bread? LOL

I can't answer that without dis'ing my family, my silversmithing teachers and/or my friends, LOL. I can tell you mine is the second worst fry bread on the planet.

http://forums.powwows.com/1581365-post11.html


I have spent some of the best times in my life in NM and east TN. I have serious weaknesses for Navajo, Pueblo and Cherokee cooking. There is little better in life than sitting outside watching the cloud shadows play over hills outside Tohatchi and eating a bowl of blue corn mush topped with raisins and brown sugar, having a big bowl of green chile stew after driving out to see the luminarias on the road up to Acoma Pueblo, or tucking into to plate of wild onions and eggs in a church fellowship hall.

It's easy and currently fashionable to view the Columbian exchange solely in terms of negatives. Without discounting the horrors of our shared history, at least in the arena of food, we have enriched as well as impoverished each other.


If I were starting out, I'd try the grape dumplings or wojapi. They're both easy and very tasty. They don't require anything you can't get at your local grocery. You can even fancy up leftovers by serving it with vanilla ice cream.

Choctaw Recipes

Various versions of three sisters soup are also approachable. They generally don't require too much in the terms of "exotic" ingredients.

Blue cornmeal mush is also approachable. Blue cornmeal can usually be found in larger cities. And if the culinary ash poses a challenge, baking soda can be used instead. (The action of the base frees bound niacin and improves the balance of amino acids available.). I'm not sure what the substitution is.

Broken Arrow 07-10-2020 03:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OLChemist (Post 1643316)

Indian Chili, Indian Tacos,Choctaw Hunter’s Stew, Indian Fry Bread, Indian Relish

as far as I understand the recipes, that might hit my taste and there will be more recipes I shall like, I think.

OLChemist 07-10-2020 04:45 PM

BA, don't pass on the pork and hominy stew.

This is another widely distributed dish. Change the meat and add different seasonings, and you find this among almost any people that grew corn. Something very like the recipe on that website is cooked and eaten all over the south, made by Indians and non-Indians. The Haudenosaunee make a version with beans and pork or venison. All over NM and AZ folks make versions with pork, chicken, venison or lamb, and a lot of roasted green chile. Made with red chile, you'll find the dish in Mexico.


The Seneca Art & Culture Center has white corn available by mail order:

Seneca Art & Culture Center - White Corn

wardancer 07-10-2020 05:01 PM

I always thought my Pop made the best frybread ! Then my wife made it and it's almost identical ! No hole , but it's the best ! Flour baking powder salt water , fried in Manteca......nothing but the best !

wardancer 07-10-2020 05:02 PM

We don't put flea collars on our puppies , for that very reason !

OLChemist 07-10-2020 07:53 PM

BA, here's one for you.

Bapa soup

4 qts water;
1 onion, diced;
3 c dried buffalo meat (or beef), cut into bite sized pieces;
1/2 string of timpsila, soaked overnight, rinsed and diced;
2 c Copes dried corn;
1 Tbsp parsley;
1/2 tsp dried thyme;
1 Tbsp oil;
6 black peppercorns;
salt.

Heat the oil in a large stock pot and sweat the onion until it is transparent. Add the water, meat, timpsila, corn, herbs, salt and peppercorns. Bring to a boil, lower heat and simmer until the timpsila and meat is tender, about 2 -3 hours. Adjust seasoning.

subeeds 07-11-2020 03:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wardancer (Post 1643309)
Wanji wasn't kidding ! :nono:

Don't you have some kittens to herd? :laughing:

wardancer 07-11-2020 10:56 AM

Why yes cuz , I've heard of kittens ! :rofl:

Broken Arrow 07-11-2020 01:21 PM

puppies Hundewelpen
kittens Katzenbaby

needed some time and I am still chewing; figuratively.

OLChemist 07-11-2020 09:11 PM

Kabubu

2 c flour;
1 Tbsp baking powder;
1 tsp salt;
1 tsp sugar;
1 Tbsp oil;
1 1/2 c milk.

oil for greasing the skillet.

Mix the dry ingredients. Add oil and milk in two or three parts, stirring between additions. Lightly grease your hands and flour the counter. Knead dough until smooth and elastic. You may need to add additional flour if the dough is sticky. Divide the dough into 4-6 parts. Let the dough rest for 15-20 mins. Pat the dough out into circle about the thickness of your pinky finger. (Kabubu comes from the sound the dough makes while you pat it out.)

Heat a heavy skillet over med-low to med. The setting depends on your skillet, your stove and the thickness of of your pinky, LOL. Put a Tbsp of oil in the skillet. Let it heat but not smoke. Add a piece of bread. Cook about 2-3 mins on the first side, until browned. Turn it over and cook the other side until browned.

The first couple times you make it, the first piece will be a test to get the temperature right. Tear your first piece open and make sure it is cooked. If not and it's well browned, the skillet is too hot. The bread needs to be able to stay in the pan long enough to cook without burning.


Dip it in your wojapi.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:23 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1
Copyright 2006, PowWows.com, LLC