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Blood Quantum. Good or Bad?

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  • tvnutt
    replied
    what is considered native

    HI,

    My first post to this forum. First of all, I'm NOT native but I have admired and studied various native cultures for as long as I can remember.

    I read a post by a member who is the Chief of a Cherokee tribe in Alabama. He said it doesn't matter HOW much blood you have, but whether you're proud of your ancestors and heritage. My husband has an ancestor who was part Cherokee. The way it works out, my husband would be like 1/128th. He NEVER says he's Cherokee but that he has Cherokee ancestry. I'd like to think that, as long as he's proud of his heritage, he IS Cherokee(in his spirit and heart).

    We aren't trying to cash in or claim anything based on his heritage. I just think he comes from a proud line of natives and Americans who helped build this country.

    Peace

    Leave a comment:


  • Joe's Dad
    replied
    Originally posted by Eaglepathfinder View Post
    As for the "heart" thing, most Indians I know have a good heart, are pleasant, repectful and accepting of others, whether white or Indian. My readings teach me that Indians were willing to share even the land with whites, that they did not believe that the land could be owned by anyone other than the creator. My grandparents were just like that in that the were very pleasant people, good hearted, respectful and accepting of others. That is the understanding I have of the Indian heart and that is what I meant.

    I'm sure there are Indians who do not have this pleasantness and accepting in their heart just as there are white people who do not share this characteristic. That is what was meant and not from a "wannabe" either. I can understand your frustration with "wannabes" as I have seen and spoken to them. Some are fake, some are delusional and some are just downright a liar. I usually quickly find someone else that needs to talk with me or something that needs to be done.
    What did u do to get all those little red things?

    I don't got any. :o(

    Leave a comment:


  • Grits & Beans
    replied
    this thread was intended to discuss blood quantum. everyone please stay on topic.

    thank you.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eaglepathfinder
    replied
    As for the "heart" thing, most Indians I know have a good heart, are pleasant, repectful and accepting of others, whether white or Indian. My readings teach me that Indians were willing to share even the land with whites, that they did not believe that the land could be owned by anyone other than the creator. My grandparents were just like that in that the were very pleasant people, good hearted, respectful and accepting of others. That is the understanding I have of the Indian heart and that is what I meant.

    I'm sure there are Indians who do not have this pleasantness and accepting in their heart just as there are white people who do not share this characteristic. That is what was meant and not from a "wannabe" either. I can understand your frustration with "wannabes" as I have seen and spoken to them. Some are fake, some are delusional and some are just downright a liar. I usually quickly find someone else that needs to talk with me or something that needs to be done.

    Leave a comment:


  • MtnLiving
    replied
    Originally posted by meashcrme View Post
    A (white but very tan) friend of mine gave birth in Colorado and the nurse put her baby's ethnicity down as native. They didn't ask her or her husband or anything. My friend didn't notice what had happened until months later in another state. When she called the hospital, they said there would have to be a blood test to verify his ethnicity.

    I've been working on getting my grandmother tribally recognized for years, and it infuriates me that a child can be born native from white parents... What?

    I think that blood quantum is important. But the information you need to apply is almost 100 years old, if you're looking on the dawes. Its all very frustrating for those of us that aren't playing dress up.
    I have lots of family from WAY back and still today in the Huntington and Fort Smith areas of Arkansas.

    I don't get the whole "the baby looks tan so it must be NDN" thing. Thats stereotyping and isn't accurate. Not all NDNs are dark skinned. First time someone from the nursing staff would have filled out, in full or part, any of my childrens birth certificate papers, there would have been a big ole stink raised by me!

    Leave a comment:


  • MtnLiving
    replied
    I mean absolutely no disrespect to the original poster....and I never dreamed I'd be saying this, but......I can understand why some get so po'd about wannabe's. Statements like the one above "....my heart is indian/red......", I can't tell you how many times I've heard it or read it from mixed or whites and it sounds funny. Fake, might be a better word. I don't know. Indians don't really talk like that, kwim? None of that is my acceptance of the way many of the mixed bloods and whites are treated on this board and that isn't me kissing up, despite what some of you might think.....its just my feelings on the subject.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eaglepathfinder
    replied
    There are many of us who did not have ancestors on the Dawes because they did not travel with the removals. Instead they married or hid in the hills of SE Ohio, WV and other parts East. Our hearts are Indian but we are classified as white or black and will never be officially recognized as Indian. We know who we are whether the government does or any other group does makes no difference to most of us. I do have one ancestor on the rolls named Isaac Johnson, cherokee from upstate NY. He came to Ohio and settled among other Indians in the hills.

    Leave a comment:


  • meashcrme
    replied
    A (white but very tan) friend of mine gave birth in Colorado and the nurse put her baby's ethnicity down as native. They didn't ask her or her husband or anything. My friend didn't notice what had happened until months later in another state. When she called the hospital, they said there would have to be a blood test to verify his ethnicity.

    I've been working on getting my grandmother tribally recognized for years, and it infuriates me that a child can be born native from white parents... What?

    I think that blood quantum is important. But the information you need to apply is almost 100 years old, if you're looking on the dawes. Its all very frustrating for those of us that aren't playing dress up.

    Leave a comment:


  • Redboots
    replied
    I am always in Awe, when it comes to this subject. Why do we have to go by someone else standards of who we are? My people are Indian before Native American was the proper name. Why do we need a blood rule or names on a role, to tell us who we are? Whether my name is on a roll or not, I am Indian. My Grand parents felt the same way. So they did not sign up with the tribe, even when the Chief is my GrandMother first cousin. No other race of people have to go through this. We are going with Goverment Guide lines of who we are. That took our Id. the first place. I just do not understand it.........

    Leave a comment:


  • Shawrakee
    replied
    [
    Last edited by Shawrakee; 02-18-2011, 09:26 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • wyo_rose
    replied
    Originally posted by Shawrakee View Post
    This can be a tough subject of explanations.
    Nope, don't have to explain anything. Everybody around here knows who they are and who they're related to.

    They've both gone to other communities and BIA boarding schools and made lots of friends from all over.

    The only person I had to explain anything to was this ignorant lady who wanted to know why I dyed my little girls' hair blonde. I explained to her that I didn't dye their hair.

    Yep, JD. Those 2 are the brattiest!

    Leave a comment:


  • Shawrakee
    replied
    [
    Last edited by Shawrakee; 02-18-2011, 09:19 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Joe's Dad
    replied
    Originally posted by Shawrakee View Post
    This can be a tough subject of explanations.
    Not really. I know the person u quoted personally. She made a statement her kids looked like grains of salt in a bunch of Cayenne pepper. Big deal. She's NDN and so are her children. Your color or features don't make you NDN. Being NDN makes you NDN.

    You removed your post that talked in circles. It couldn't be that tough to explain.

    Hey wyo...I was being just rugged on your brats, eh?

    Leave a comment:


  • Joe's Dad
    replied
    Not the first bit in the world.

    Don't go in circles. Just speak your piece like you're talking amongst a bunch of NDNs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shawrakee
    replied
    [
    Last edited by Shawrakee; 02-18-2011, 09:18 AM.

    Leave a comment:

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