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  • Josiah is this information correct?

    Is the information about the Cherokees correct in this "story"

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  • #2
    I showed it to one of our tribal historians and thought he needing assistance at the emergency room for uncontrollable laughter ...

    I have ran across several documents like this on Ancestry.com, hell I have one that shows I am a Descendant of Chief Moytoy!!
    Ok where to start,
    I use ancestry.com for one thing and one thing only and that is to have access to digital copies of documents from the National Archives and use them to research with my own eyes. The very earliest Cherokee Roll is 1817. But that is not a complete roll of the tribe only those that were exchanging land in the east for a 640 acre piece in Arkansas which they were screwed out of in 1828 and compelled to move into Indian Territory in 1832. These were old settlers and were counted separately in 1851 and again in 1896 then combined in 1907 and separated again in 1996 or what we now know as United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma one of the Three Federally Recognized Cherokee tribes.
    The very very earliest documents that I have found that I would consider valid proof that could stand up to any scrutiny is the Missionary School rolls at Spring Place near present day Ellijay, Georgia it was forced closed in 1840. But even these are incomplete for they only list children and sometimes what town they were from. As for these narratives that I find on ancestry.com of historical figures they only ever list just a few Cherokees from history blending some verifiable history with conjecture and fantasy.
    For here is the real problem and I call it the Time Gap
    The most earliest roll of the Majority of the tribe was taken in 1835 and that was of "Eastern" Cherokees that were being force marched to Indian Territory, I say Eastern for there were already 4 or 5 thousand already in Indian Territory and 3 or 4 thousand that remained in North Carolina. I have read numbers in the 16000 thousand range and about 4000 perished on the Trail of Tears.
    Here is the 1st big Problem, the roll was taken in 1835 the actual movement was in 1838-1839 in 1841 a roll was taken to document claims and that was bounced against the 1835 Roll to figure out who actually was allowed a claim and who left early and who went back to North Carolina later. To further complicate matters it only lists the Head of Household (Man) and just a number for the remainder in the home. So if you were only doing research of the Paternal line to 1835 you have a chance but wait let us talk about names!!
    Here is the 2nd BIG problem: in this timeframe 1820's-1830's a person's name was their own name they were called by this name they were known in their clan by this name. But this is the time of the beginning of the big transition for Cherokee Naming conventions and that is the European use of the Surname started creeping in usually by a White Trader marrying a Cherokee Wife and thus changing her name to match her Husbands. Which was not a tradition with Cherokees, a wife had her name and the husband had his! The Children belonged to the wife's clan and were taught by there MATERNAL uncles in the traditions of the tribe... In 1825 a Cherokee chief married a White woman who bore him children by Cherokee law they were not considered Cherokee but white, they did not have a clan thus could not be citizens of the Cherokee Nation and could not use there father's clan as proof! So a law was passed and the clan system was changed along with naming of children but this really didn't take hold until the 1880's and even then I found some Cherokees held onto the old way far into the 20th century. Another words at this time a Cherokee who had brothers and sisters with same parents could all have different names and the direct descendants would take their parents names as their surname and become different lines overnight if you were trace merely by surname as a European might do!!!

    So here is how the time gap works:
    I am a diligent researcher and I start tracing backwards generation by generation. On my white side I can trace the name of the Maternal Grandfather all the way back to England generation by generation using the federal census they were land holders so plenty of documents with land titles, voting logs, Muster papers, Federal census every 10 years and with reasonable certainty I can trace to the entry into the Colonies in 1640 from Liverpool England even have a ships manifest and further back Baptism records, Tariffs, Tax Documents and sundry other written documents that we leave as we move thru life. The surname spelling changed slightly as it was Americanized but like I said I have other ways to trace to prove that ancestor begat that son or daughter in an unbroken chain!
    Now lets trace a Native, Cherokees are one of the oldest documented tribes I have done research on others and we have by far the most documents that we can use... Having said that here comes the time gap! I trace my Paternal Grandfather back 2 generations and I already run into a surname issue for my GG Grandfather used 5 different names in his lifetime mostly used his English name as Alex but spelled Alix, Aleck, Alec his Cherokee name was Smoke or Brown sometimes Soot but if you translated it correctly it means Burnt Tobacco or at that point when the Tobacco was all used up. He was born in 1852 so he was not listed on the 1851 Drennon Roll his Dad Lewis or Lewye was no where to be found on the Drennon Roll, I found him on the 1880 Cherokee Census that was done by the Cherokee Tribe itself but at that time Alex was not living in his household had moved on and Married. So I used his Testimony in the 1909 Miller Roll to determine who his parents were they could not find his Dad on the 1851 Roll but found an aunt so that was good enough for them. I found the Dad listed on the 1880 Census and a Muster Roll in 1861 in Ft Gibson at the beginning of the Civil War when the Cherokees fought for the South. I know he was born sometime in 1830 because his age was 50 in 1880 but I don't know the month I know the name of his mother was Susan but no last name she used that as her English name the Father of Lewis did not use an English name only Tuwodi and I found a record of that name in the Spring place Missionary School in 1809 that he went to school there for 1 year and that a Suate brought him to the school for education they were from North Carolina no mention of what town. They are not listed in 1817,1835,1851 any other Roll. I found a Tuwodi buried in Fisher cemetery in Eastern Oklahoma his grave stone is written in Cherokee only, he died in 1890 and that is the only Hard fact of Tuwodi that I can find.
    So what can you gather from this one case? is it that hard to trace native with any certainty? Well in my case that was the only line I could trace back with any certainty I can take my Great Grandmothers side and stop at her parents they are not listed any further back than 1851 and actually all lines stop at 1851 for if any one was born after 1851 they will not be listed its 50 years later in 1909 that you even see Narratives that describe the subjects grand parents. I have read literally thousands of these documents of the 1909 Guion Miller roll and dates, locations, specific information is not a common item that you will find. you will see information such as I do not know what name they used for that roll or they were born in the East, (remember Cherokees did not live in any particular State but rather there Territory)! A very common way to describe when a person died was Death date not known or they died in the summer during the War ( was it 1861-1865?) How old were they? they were older than there teeth but as old as their tongue. If I read it once I read it a hundred times in these old rolls when the person writing down the information would say "How Old are you"? The subject would say "50"! "So you were born during the time of the Drennon Roll" and they would say "no", that was before I was born, "so you were born during the war? and They would say "no" afterwards so that would put there age closer to 40!!
    So to sum up my answer I would have to so No
    This information is not accurate unless I could see where they gained the information such as Muster Rolls Census Papers
    Oh wait the Federal Census only lists Head of household until 1850!! When it would name the wife but no maiden name!! hmmmm
    Like I said without any Certainty
    Last edited by Josiah; 04-26-2015, 02:36 PM.
    ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ - Anigiduwagi
    Till I Die!

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you!

      Do I have your permission to copy your response onto the comments section of my tree on Ancestry. Chief Cornstalk is my 7th Grandfather. I had wanted to trace back his genealogy but there is so much misinformation on Ancestry.

      One last question before I do some major tree branch destruction :)

      Was Chief Cornstalk a full blooded Indian?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Elizabeth Costales View Post
        Do I have your permission to copy your response onto the comments section of my tree on Ancestry. Chief Cornstalk is my 7th Grandfather. I had wanted to trace back his genealogy but there is so much misinformation on Ancestry.

        One last question before I do some major tree branch destruction :)

        Was Chief Cornstalk a full blooded Indian?
        Interesting question, Actually that was not an issue until 1934 when the Howard Act was enacted by Congress http://www.cskt.org/gov/docs/reorganizationact.pdf , it was something that had been counted prior to this but only in an offhanded way and mainly by the person taking the roll physically looking at the person and asking several questions.
        So to answer your question I would say it is possible he was, but to say with any certainty I can't say without doing the research myself.
        ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ - Anigiduwagi
        Till I Die!

        Comment


        • #5
          :)

          Is it ok to post your answer in a comment on my family tree. I appreciate your answers and the time you took to answer my questions. Thank you.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Elizabeth Costales View Post
            Is it ok to post your answer in a comment on my family tree. I appreciate your answers and the time you took to answer my questions. Thank you.
            Yes
            ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ - Anigiduwagi
            Till I Die!

            Comment


            • #7
              Rolls of all Three Cherokee Nations

              Reservation Rolls - 1817 A listing of those Cherokees desiring a 640 acre tract in the east and permitted to reside their. No record exists of the 2,000 Cherokees who emigrated before 1817.

              Emigration Rolls - 1817 A listing of those Cherokees emigrating to 1835 Arkansas territory & later 1828 to Oklahoma In 1828, the Cherokees ceded their lands in Arkansas for land in Oklahoma.

              Henderson Rolls - 1835 A listing of 16,000 Cherokees living in Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, & North Carolina to be removed to Oklahoma, per Treaty New Echota. (Also called the Trail of Tears Roll)

              The "Treaty of New Echota", 29 Dec 1835, represented the final cession of all Cherokee lands east of the Mississippi. This Census (NARC T-496) was taken of the Western Cherokees in 1835 before they were force to move in what is know as "The Trail of Tears" to Oklahoma. But in the three years between 1835 and 1838 no records seem to have been kept of those Cherokee Indians who were born, who died (4,000) along the way, who never left their homes, or who initially reached the new territory in the west. Commissioner of Indian Affairs in 1835 by Major Currey who was in charge of the Census classified as "Indian" anyone with 1/4 degree of Indian blood. In 1838, several hundred Cherokees in the East escaped into the mountains of North Carolina and became known as the Eastern Band of Cherokees. At about the same time, many elected to take advantage of Article 12 of the 1835 treaty which allowed those desirous to stay in the east if they met certain criteria.

              Mullay Roll -1848 A listing of 1,517 Cherokees living in in North Carolina after the removal of 1838 Agent John C. Mullay took the Census pursuant to an act of Congress in 1848.

              Siler Roll - 1851 A listing of 1,700 Cherokees living in Eastern Cherokee entitled to a per capita payment pursuant an act of Congress in 1850. In 1851, David W. Silar was appointed to take a census of the Cherokees east of the Mississippi to determine who could be eligible to participate in a per capita payment based on the 1835 treaty. Silar submitted his census list which contained 1,959? individuals by state and county in North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama.

              Old Settler Roll- 1851 A listing of Cherokees still living in 1851 who already residing in Oklahoma when the main body of the Cherokee arrived in the winter of 1839 (Trail of Tears) Approximately one third were Old Settlers and two third were new arrivals. The 1851 Old Settler Roll lists each individual by district and his/her children unless the mother was an emigrant Cherokee. In this case, the children were listed with their mother on the Drennen Roll 1852. There were 44 family groups listed as non-residents. Guion Miller used this roll in compiling the 1910 record.

              Chapman Roll - 1852 Prepared by Albert Chapman as a listing of those Cherokee actually receiving payment based on Siler 1851 Eastern Census. In 1851 and 1852 the per capita payments were made by Alfred Chapman based on Silar's census to 2,134 individuals. This roll played an important part in Guion Miller's preparation of his roll completed in 1910. Anyone who could trace their ancestry to an individual on the Chapman Roll was included on Miller's roll.

              Drennen Roll - 1852 Prepared by John Drennen as a listing of first Census of "New" arrivals of 1839 in Oklahoma. (Trail of Tears)
              (This Roll was used to determine if an applicant was authorized to be included in the payment of the Guion Miller Roll 1909)

              Federal Census 1860 contains Indian lands in Arkansas

              Swetland Roll - 1869 Prepared by S.H. Swetland as a listing of those Cherokee, and their decedents, who were listed as remaining in North Carolina by Mullay 1848 Census. Made pursuant to an act of Congress 1868 for a removal payment authorization. S. H. Swetland was appointed to take a census in 1868. He was touse the Mullay Roll of 1848 as the basis for his census. This census was completed in 1868 and gives the families in the Eastern Cherokee band.

              Hester Roll – 1883 Prepared by Joseph G. Hester as a listing of Eastern Cherokee in 1883. (This Roll is an excellent source of information. Includes ancestors, Chapman Roll Number, age English name and Indian name.)

              In 1882, Joseph G. Hester was appointed to take the 5th census of the Eastern Band. Copies of the previous census were made available to him and he was required to account for all persons on the previous rolls by either including them on the new roll, noting their deaths on the old rolls or describing their whereabouts as unknown either to Mr. Hester or any of the Native Americans. This completed roll was submitted to the Secretary of Interior in 1884. It contained 2,956 persons residing in North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina, Virginia, Illinois, Kansas, Colorado, Kentucky, New Jersey, and California. Those living west of the Mississippi and listed by Mr. Hester were descendants of members of the Eastern Band and had no affiliation with the Cherokee Nation in the west.

              Federal Census - 1880 (Note the 1880 Indian Schedules for this Federal Census were destroyed.) In 1879, the Cherokee National Council authorized a census and this 1880 Census was arranged in 6 schedules. Again, in 1883 and 1886, The Cherokee National Council authorized another census. Federal Census - 1890 In 1890, another census of the Cherokee Nation was made and it is probably the most complete of any of the census. It included Cherokees and adopted whites, Shawnees and Delawares, orphans under 16 yrs, those denied citizenship by the Cherokee authorities, those whose claims to citizenship were pending, intruders and whites living in the Cherokee Nation by permission.

              Payment Roll - 1896 The 1896 Payment Roll is based on the above 1851 Old Settler Roll and listed each payee 1851 roll number, name, age, sex, and post office address.

              DAWES Roll - 1907 The final Roll for allotting the land was taken from 1898-1914 majority of the roll was accomplished by 1905 with 300 court cases that were finally settled by 1914. This terminated the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. Senator Henry L. Dawes was the Commission's Chairman.

              Federal Census - 1900 This lists members of the Five Civilized Tribes as well as Whites and Blacks living in the Indian Territory. (First complete listing that survives today of Indian living in Oklahoma that was accomplished by the Federal Government it also lists if known the persons Indian Name VERY Important info)

              Churchill Roll - 1908 Prepared by Frank C. Churchill as a listing of Eastern Cherokee to "Certify Members" of the Eastern Band. (Like the Hester above has lots of Information)

              Guion Miller Roll - 1909 Prepared by Guion Miller of all Eastern Cherokee (Not Old Settlers), residing in the either East or West of the Mississippi River. Ordered by the Court of Claims as result of "Suit" won by Eastern Cherokees. (Perhaps one of the most important rolls for either husband or wife could file a claim so Maternal and Paternal lines could be searched)

              Baker Roll - 1924 This was supposed to be the "final Roll" of the Eastern Cherokee. The land was to be allotted and all were to become citizens. Fortunately the Eastern Cherokee avoided the termination procedures, unlike their brothers of the Cherokee Nation West. The Baker Roll Revised is the currant membership Roll of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians in North Carolina.

              There have been other census taken from time to time that included the some of the Creek, Shawnees and Delawares that became part of the Cherokee Nation. There are numerous other records available in the National Archives which include records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, US Army Mobile Units, Records of the Supreme Court, Records of the US District Courts, Records of the US Court of Appeals, Records of the US Court of Claims, Records of the Veterans Administration. Since the Cherokee Indians were not (generally) subject to state courts, their civil and criminal court records are normally found in the Federal Court records.
              Last edited by Josiah; 04-27-2015, 01:27 PM.
              ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ - Anigiduwagi
              Till I Die!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Josiah View Post
                Reservation Rolls - 1817 A listing of those Cherokees desiring a 640 acre tract in the east and permitted to reside their. No record exists of the 2,000 Cherokees who emigrated before 1817.

                Emigration Rolls - 1817 A listing of those Cherokees emigrating to 1835 Arkansas territory & later 1828 to Oklahoma In 1828, the Cherokees ceded their lands in Arkansas for land in Oklahoma.

                Henderson Rolls - 1835 A listing of 16,000 Cherokees living in Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, & North Carolina to be removed to Oklahoma, per Treaty New Echota. (Also called the Trail of Tears Roll)

                The "Treaty of New Echota", 29 Dec 1835, represented the final cession of all Cherokee lands east of the Mississippi. This Census (NARC T-496) was taken of the Western Cherokees in 1835 before they were force to move in what is know as "The Trail of Tears" to Oklahoma. But in the three years between 1835 and 1838 no records seem to have been kept of those Cherokee Indians who were born, who died (4,000) along the way, who never left their homes, or who initially reached the new territory in the west. Commissioner of Indian Affairs in 1835 by Major Currey who was in charge of the Census classified as "Indian" anyone with 1/4 degree of Indian blood. In 1838, several hundred Cherokees in the East escaped into the mountains of North Carolina and became known as the Eastern Band of Cherokees. At about the same time, many elected to take advantage of Article 12 of the 1835 treaty which allowed those desirous to stay in the east if they met certain criteria.

                Mullay Roll -1848 A listing of 1,517 Cherokees living in in North Carolina after the removal of 1838 Agent John C. Mullay took the Census pursuant to an act of Congress in 1848.

                Siler Roll - 1851 A listing of 1,700 Cherokees living in Eastern Cherokee entitled to a per capita payment pursuant an act of Congress in 1850. In 1851, David W. Silar was appointed to take a census of the Cherokees east of the Mississippi to determine who could be eligible to participate in a per capita payment based on the 1835 treaty. Silar submitted his census list which contained 1,959? individuals by state and county in North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama.

                Old Settler Roll- 1851 A listing of Cherokees still living in 1851 who already residing in Oklahoma when the main body of the Cherokee arrived in the winter of 1839 (Trail of Tears) Approximately one third were Old Settlers and two third were new arrivals. The 1851 Old Settler Roll lists each individual by district and his/her children unless the mother was an emigrant Cherokee. In this case, the children were listed with their mother on the Drennen Roll 1852. There were 44 family groups listed as non-residents. Guion Miller used this roll in compiling the 1910 record.

                Chapman Roll - 1852 Prepared by Albert Chapman as a listing of those Cherokee actually receiving payment based on Siler 1851 Eastern Census. In 1851 and 1852 the per capita payments were made by Alfred Chapman based on Silar's census to 2,134 individuals. This roll played an important part in Guion Miller's preparation of his roll completed in 1910. Anyone who could trace their ancestry to an individual on the Chapman Roll was included on Miller's roll.

                Drennen Roll - 1852 Prepared by John Drennen as a listing of first Census of "New" arrivals of 1839 in Oklahoma. (Trail of Tears)
                (This Roll was used to determine if an applicant was authorized to be included in the payment of the Guion Miller Roll 1909)

                Federal Census 1860 contains Indian lands in Arkansas

                Swetland Roll - 1869 Prepared by S.H. Swetland as a listing of those Cherokee, and their decedents, who were listed as remaining in North Carolina by Mullay 1848 Census. Made pursuant to an act of Congress 1868 for a removal payment authorization. S. H. Swetland was appointed to take a census in 1868. He was touse the Mullay Roll of 1848 as the basis for his census. This census was completed in 1868 and gives the families in the Eastern Cherokee band.

                Hester Roll – 1883 Prepared by Joseph G. Hester as a listing of Eastern Cherokee in 1883. (This Roll is an excellent source of information. Includes ancestors, Chapman Roll Number, age English name and Indian name.)

                In 1882, Joseph G. Hester was appointed to take the 5th census of the Eastern Band. Copies of the previous census were made available to him and he was required to account for all persons on the previous rolls by either including them on the new roll, noting their deaths on the old rolls or describing their whereabouts as unknown either to Mr. Hester or any of the Native Americans. This completed roll was submitted to the Secretary of Interior in 1884. It contained 2,956 persons residing in North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina, Virginia, Illinois, Kansas, Colorado, Kentucky, New Jersey, and California. Those living west of the Mississippi and listed by Mr. Hester were descendants of members of the Eastern Band and had no affiliation with the Cherokee Nation in the west.

                Federal Census - 1880 (Note the 1880 Indian Schedules for this Federal Census were destroyed.) In 1879, the Cherokee National Council authorized a census and this 1880 Census was arranged in 6 schedules. Again, in 1883 and 1886, The Cherokee National Council authorized another census. Federal Census - 1890 In 1890, another census of the Cherokee Nation was made and it is probably the most complete of any of the census. It included Cherokees and adopted whites, Shawnees and Delawares, orphans under 16 yrs, those denied citizenship by the Cherokee authorities, those whose claims to citizenship were pending, intruders and whites living in the Cherokee Nation by permission.

                Payment Roll - 1896 The 1896 Payment Roll is based on the above 1851 Old Settler Roll and listed each payee 1851 roll number, name, age, sex, and post office address.

                DAWES Roll - 1907 The final Roll for allotting the land was taken from 1898-1914 majority of the roll was accomplished by 1905 with 300 court cases that were finally settled by 1914. This terminated the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. Senator Henry L. Dawes was the Commission's Chairman.

                Federal Census - 1900 This lists members of the Five Civilized Tribes as well as Whites and Blacks living in the Indian Territory. (First complete listing that survives today of Indian living in Oklahoma that was accomplished by the Federal Government it also lists if known the persons Indian Name VERY Important info)

                Churchill Roll - 1908 Prepared by Frank C. Churchill as a listing of Eastern Cherokee to "Certify Members" of the Eastern Band. (Like the Hester above has lots of Information)

                Guion Miller Roll - 1909 Prepared by Guion Miller of all Eastern Cherokee (Not Old Settlers), residing in the either East or West of the Mississippi River. Ordered by the Court of Claims as result of "Suit" won by Eastern Cherokees. (Perhaps one of the most important rolls for either husband or wife could file a claim so Maternal and Paternal lines could be searched)

                Baker Roll - 1924 This was supposed to be the "final Roll" of the Eastern Cherokee. The land was to be allotted and all were to become citizens. Fortunately the Eastern Cherokee avoided the termination procedures, unlike their brothers of the Cherokee Nation West. The Baker Roll Revised is the currant membership Roll of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians in North Carolina.

                There have been other census taken from time to time that included the some of the Creek, Shawnees and Delawares that became part of the Cherokee Nation. There are numerous other records available in the National Archives which include records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, US Army Mobile Units, Records of the Supreme Court, Records of the US District Courts, Records of the US Court of Appeals, Records of the US Court of Claims, Records of the Veterans Administration. Since the Cherokee Indians were not (generally) subject to state courts, their civil and criminal court records are normally found in the Federal Court records.
                Oops left out the Last Roll!
                1947 United Keetoowah Roll of Oklahoma it lists Full blood and Half breeds that considered themselves Keetoowah (Kituah) The Tribe organized itself under the OIWA of 1936, However the BIA did not have a method for granting Recognition to a Tribe until the 1970's and then was held up in various court cases until Approval was granted in 1996. Quite a few that are listed on this roll never got to see the recognition, my Grandparents, Uncles and Aunts are on this Roll makes me sad they never saw the final outcome!

                Today only the Eastern Band and Keetoowah Band have a method to Enroll a person into the tribe the Cherokee Nation only Grants citizenship as a Cherokee the Rolls were closed in 1907 and haven't been reopened since. Understand this all three are Federally Recognized and as a Tribal member you are granted full rights as a Citizen of that tribe provided you live within the Tribal Jurisdiction, Only the Cherokee Nation recognizes At Large Citizens and grants them voting rights and other limited rights such as Car Tags and Health Care at an IHS facility.
                ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ - Anigiduwagi
                Till I Die!

                Comment


                • #9
                  This is an excellent article describing Spring place and the Missionaries that converted Cherokees
                  Attached Files
                  ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ - Anigiduwagi
                  Till I Die!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks

                    I have trimmed the misinformation from my family tree.


                    Thanks for the helping hand. Shadow and Light by Elizabethjunean on DeviantArt

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Elizabeth Costales View Post
                      I have trimmed the misinformation from my family tree.


                      Thanks for the helping hand. Shadow and Light by Elizabethjunean on DeviantArt
                      I have been using ancestry.com since 2006 and at first used all the information that I would find from other member trees that seem to connect with mine. I am talking both of my lines Paternal and Maternal. I noticed however that the farther one goes back in time the less it seems likely the information is correct. I started noticing that Birth and Death Dates could not possibly be correct because of the ages and simple math like the mother was age three when she had her first born simple things like that. But other issues started creeping in and so about 2009 I Cleaned house and found tons of inaccurate information on both sides. I seldom use information from other trees and if I do, I look carefully at it before I hit ignore!
                      Family stories are usefully in getting you to the area that you need but if you are serious about ACCURATE Information you will only use them as a guide not as gospel! I have read literally thousands of Miller Roll applications and found accounts from siblings would vary as for spelling of grandparents names dates and locations ect ect. I had one report their parents were dead when in reality they were alive and applied for themselves and even outlived the person that reported that!! I have found information that was taken down from 6 siblings 4 girls and 2 boys all in there 40's and 50's when the roll was taken had 6 different names for there grandparents and some even left off other siblings on there application!! You have to sift and sort this information and map out what you have I actually diagram out what each is saying and comparing all 6 found got a clearer picture of what the Grandparents names were. Also use maps to figure out where they were living at the time of these events this will also eliminate the possibility that you have a similar name but they are unrelated to the family your are seeking. Above all else remember something very very important: Natives live in families and know who they were kin to and where they went and who they married I have found that kind of information over and over and over. Specific dates not so much and specific names nope but they could tell you who was with whom and what they were called at that time. If you read these rolls in that manner you will find tons of information. Also Remember that Natives lived in clusters that is why a map is important because I have found where one lived I could scroll onto the next few pages and find others that there names were misspelled slightly but the family matched who I had as living with them!!
                      The idea that people escaped or hid out is ludicrous for these were communities and to this day they still keep in touch and know who or where you came from and that is a Fact.
                      ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ - Anigiduwagi
                      Till I Die!

                      Comment

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